Archive for the ‘MOD’ Category

Do you have questions? Ask us

Wednesday, August 9th, 2017

Have a question about becoming pregnant? Do you want to learn more about what to expect during your pregnancy? Is your baby in the NICU? Let us help.

Our Health Education Specialists provide women and families with evidence-based information about having a healthy pregnancy and reducing the risk of having a preterm birth. Our specialists have been answering questions from women and families since 1997.

How can you reach our specialists?

Our specialists can answer your questions in both English and Spanish. For English, text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org. For Spanish, text or email preguntas@marchofdimes.org. You can also submit your questions through our website. Just complete our online form and one of our staff will respond within 2 business days.

Health Education Specialists all have master’s degrees in health fields such as public health, health science, nutrition and genetic counseling. We also have a certified lactation counselor on staff.

What information can our center provide?

Our specialists can provide information on many topics including:

  • starting a family
  • how to have a healthy pregnancy
  • pregnancy complication and risks
  • newborn health
  • prematurity
  • the NICU experience
  • lasting effects of prematurity
  • birth defects and special needs
  • pregnancy and infant loss.

If you are looking for information related to any of the topics listed, you’ve come to the right place. Reach out for resources and support. Our Health Education Specialists are here for you.

How does buying diapers support the March of Dimes?

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

pampers photoToday’s guest post is written by Natalie Diaz, preemie mom, bestselling author of “What To Do When You’re Having Two” and founder of Twiniversity. Read her inspiring story below and how you can help support other families.

I’ve spent my share of time in the NICU; 31 days to be exact. Delivering my twins at exactly 34 weeks due to HELLP Syndrome (a variant of preeclampsia), my family got to learn the ins and outs of a section of the hospital I thought I would never want to visit, let alone stay in. In hindsight, the time I spent at the Mt. Sinai NICU in New York City was not only therapeutic for my twins, but life changing for me. The team there taught me more than I thought any new mom could learn; not just from the medical side of things, but also how to heal my heart emotionally after the trauma of an unexpected early delivery.

After the twins were born, I got involved with the March of Dimes. I participated in their “March for Babies” for years and raised money that went towards research, education, support, and advocacy to help preemie parents like myself. I know the only “cure” for my prenatal condition was the delivery of my twins, and perhaps just taking some literal steps could prevent that from happening to the next mom.

In 2009, I took my desire to help preemie twin parents a step further and launched Twiniversity. With over 60% of twin babies born prematurely, I wanted to offer a place online where families of twins could read about issues exclusive to our community and gain knowledge and insight, along with connections with other twin parents who’ve walked in their shoes. So not only could I support the March of Dimes during their annual walk, but now I could support families daily.

On July 11th, you can help support the March of Dimes without ever leaving your chair on Amazon’s Prime Day. Sign up for a new Pampers subscription on Amazon Prime Day and Pampers will donate $10 to the March of Dimes to support families with babies in the NICU – up to $160,000!

If you aren’t familiar with Prime Day, it’s an online shopping celebration exclusively for Amazon Prime Members, featuring amazing deals, exclusive opportunities, and now a way to give back. Not only can parents make sure their baby has the diapers they need at an affordable price by purchasing a Pampers subscription, but on Prime Day this purchase also provides information, expert advice, tools, and comfort for families with a sick or premature baby in the NICU as part of Pampers support of the March of Dimes.

Pampers will not just be making donations on Prime Day thanks to your subscriptions, but they will also host an hours long Facebook Live on the Pampers Facebook page, kicking off at 9am EST. With social media celebrity guests, real parents with real advice, and parenting experts, you can join the Prime Day party by tuning in and using the exclusive hashtag #Pampers4Preemies.

So join the Prime celebration, save money with Subscribe & Save, know your babies are covered with up to 12 hours of leak free protection from Pampers, and help support the March of Dimes all at the same time.

See you online on the 11th! I wouldn’t miss the Pampers Online Prime Day celebration for the world.

The March of Dimes does not endorse specific brands or products.

Researchers identify a new form of muscular dystrophy

Monday, March 6th, 2017

MOD scienceResearchers, funded in part by the March of Dimes, have identified a genetic mutation which causes a new form of muscular dystrophy (MD).

This particular form of MD has many features, such as short height, cataracts (eye problems causing it hard to see), and intellectual disability, that are similar to other disorders. The overlap has caused confusion for physicians and researchers, until now. An international group of researchers were able to show that mutations (changes) in the INPP5K gene are responsible for a unique form of MD.

“Families and physicians have been searching for the origins of this rare disorder for years,” says Dr. Chiara Manzini, one of the researchers. “Children with a similar combination of symptoms had been described in the medical literature before, but it was unclear whether or not it was a new disease. Now we know it’s a variant of MD that affects other organs.”

Muscular dystrophy is a group of disorders that causes muscle weakness and muscle loss over time. Most people with MD are eventually unable to walk. More than 250,000 Americans are affected by the approximately 30 forms of MD and other related neuromuscular disorders. MD is inherited, meaning it is passed down from parents to their children.

How does this research help families?

Identifying a target gene, such as the INPP5K gene, reduces uncertainty for families. It allows parents to receive a precise diagnosis instead of not knowing what condition their child may have. In addition, knowing their child’s exact disorder can help families understand which medical specialists should be consulted and it can aid in overall clinical management.It gives hope to families that new, targeted treatments may become available in the future. Finally, a specific diagnosis will help health care providers better understand the disease and how it affects a child throughout his life.

“This is a great example of collaborative, innovative genetic research that has an immediate benefit to babies and their families,” says Joe Leigh Simpson, MD, senior vice president for Research and Global Programs at the March of Dimes. “Studying rare disorders can also teach us more about common conditions that affect millions of people in the United States and around the world.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

New study offers clues as to why some women give birth prematurely

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

research_birthdefectsresearch_rdax_50Why do some women give birth early and others don’t? March of Dimes researchers are trying to find the answer to this question. A new study has revealed important clues.

The type of bacteria found in a woman’s cervix and vagina during pregnancy may either increase the risk of premature birth or protect against it.

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Maryland collected cervicovaginal (CV) bacteria from 2,000 women at three different times during their pregnancies. They then analyzed the bacteria. They found that some of the bacteria actually lowered the risk of spontaneous preterm birth. But other types of bacteria increased the chance of preterm birth significantly. The bacteria associated with spontaneous preterm birth, either providing a protective effect or increasing risk, were different between African-American and non-African-American women.

If the study is confirmed, it could mean that targeting CV bacteria may be a new therapy to prevent premature birth. Edward R.B. McCabe, MD, PhD, senior vice president and chief medical officer of the March of Dimes, stated, “From these data, we may learn how to prevent preterm birth either by eliminating the CV bacteria that are associated with an increased risk and/or by enhancing the presence of protective bacteria. This is a promising new area that should become a research priority.”

Learn more about how March of Dimes researchers are working to better understand the causes of premature birth on our website.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Vote for us in Healthline’s Best Health Blog Contest

Friday, November 25th, 2016

We’re thrilled! News Moms Need has been nominated in Healthline’s “Best Health Blog Contest.” Now, we need your votes to win.

Won’t you take a moment each day, from now until December 12th, to cast your vote for us? It’s simple:

2016 Healthline winner widgetWe were grateful when we were selected as a winner in Healthline’s Best Pregnancy Blogs earlier this year.  Now, Healthline’s Best Health Blog award would be an even greater honor, especially as we cover topics from preconception to childbirth, to babies with special needs and staying safe from Zika.

Our goal is to keep you and your family healthy  – all News Moms Need!

We’d love to receive this award. But most of all, we’d love to know that you support our blog.

Thanks so much in advance for voting.

Your bloggers,

Barbara, Sara and Lauren

 

 

March of Dimes honors CDC Director for work protecting moms and babies from Zika

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Dr. Frieden, Dir. CDCToday, Dr. Frieden received the March of Dimes President’s Leadership Award for serving as a champion in the fight against Zika. This award is given to acknowledge very high levels of achievement in preventing birth defects, premature birth, and infant mortality. Dr. Frieden is receiving it for his outstanding leadership in combatting Zika and raising public awareness of its threat to newborn health.

The March of Dimes and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have been working together for many years to protect moms, babies and families from diseases and to promote good health. Since the Zika outbreak, March of Dimes and CDC have joined forces to spread the word about the devastating impact of this virus on pregnant women and babies.

Thomas Frieden, MD, MPH, Director of the CDC, is at the helm focusing national and global attention on this virus. Zika can cause microcephaly and other brain problems, and is linked to miscarriage and stillbirth.

Dr. Howse, President of March of Dimes says “We’re giving Dr. Frieden this award to show our gratitude for his dedication to preventing Zika virus infection during this epidemic. His decisive actions and strong voice for protecting women and families from serious birth defects caused by Zika are at the heart of our mission.”

Thank you Dr. Frieden. Together we will continue educating the public on how they can protect themselves from Zika.

To learn more about the Zika virus – where it is in the world, its impact on pregnant women and babies, and what you can do to stay safe – visit marchofdimes.org/zika.

If you have questions, send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We’re here to help.

 

Give them tomorrow

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

Give them tomorrowToday is an important one here at the March of Dimes.

Today we launch our new campaign, Give them tomorrow, to raise awareness and funds to fight birth defects and premature birth, the #1 killer of babies in the United States.

This campaign is different. You have the opportunity to help give a fighting chance for every baby by:

  • sending a message of hope to a family of a baby in the NICU (newborn intensive care unit), which the March of Dimes will hand-deliver.
  • sharing your baby’s first milestones at #babysfirst with our social community.
  • engaging with us on World Prematurity Day, November 17th to raise awareness and learn about the cutting edge prematurity research that saves babies’ lives.

We have set a goal to generate 380,000 actions to save babies’ lives, to symbolize the 380,000 babies born too soon each year in the U.S. That’s 1 in 10 babies born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy). This rate is higher than most other high-resource nations.

Even babies born just a few weeks too soon can face serious health challenges and are at risk for lifelong disabilities including breathing problems, vision loss, cerebral palsy, developmental delays and intellectual disabilities. The problem of prematurity involves babies being born too soon and often with birth defects and complications that affect them for life — that’s if they make it through the first critical days and weeks. There are so many challenges for these babies and their families from day one that tomorrow is a dream.

Give them tomorrow is supported by our corporate partners who are committed to saving babies’ lives. Partners in 2016 include Mud Pie, Philips Avent, Famous Footwear, ALEX AND ANI, ALDI, Bon-Ton, and Anthem Foundation.

Won’t you join us today as we make a difference in the lives of all babies?

Together we can give them tomorrow by doing something today.

 

We're in this together

 

The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. For more than 75 years, moms and babies have benefited from March of Dimes research, education, vaccines, and breakthroughs. For the latest resources and health information, visit marchofdimes.org and nacersano.org. You can also find us on Facebook or follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

News Moms Need and @modhealthtalk win awards!

Friday, June 10th, 2016

s2016_dha_winner_printAw-shucks – the News Moms Need blog and @modhealthtalk Twitter handle each received a MERIT award in the 2016 Digital Health Awards competition! News Moms Need received the award in the Publications category while @modhealhtalk received the award in the Social Media category. Both the blog and Twitter account have won awards in prior years; we are happy to be honored once again.

As you probably are already aware, this blog provides posts on topics including preconception health, pregnancy, postpartum, prematurity, life in the NICU, infant health, birth defects, parenting a child with a disability, and infant loss. It covers everything from how to choose a sunscreen during pregnancy to understanding pregnancy risks and complications. Our team of bloggers seeks to present evidenced-based information in a conversational manner.

The @modhealthtalk Twitter handle specializes in providing up to date health content to consumers and engages them in Twitter chats on various topics related to the mission of the March of Dimes. If you are not currently following us on Twitter, please do!

The Digital Health Awards contest honors “the world’s best digital health resources.” Hundreds of local, state and national health-related organizations and companies enter the competition. March of Dimes is in good company, as winners include American Academy of Pediatrics, American Heart Association, Cigna, Cleveland Clinic, Drugs.com, GlaxoSmithKline, Health Net, Inc., Johns Hopkins Health System, National Cancer Institute, Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Sharecare among others.

The March of Dimes is proud to be recognized once again as being among the best in the consumer health education field.

Crazy luck – one mom’s story

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015
CharlieNICU (2)Today, in recognition of World Prematurity Day, we are honored to share this post written by a mom of a preemie about what Prematurity Awareness Month means to her.

Lots of people don’t know what it means to have a premature baby. I didn’t know either, before I had my baby. Charlie was born  at 25 weeks, weighing 1 pound 15 ounces.

If you had told me that I, a healthy person with not a single complication in my first 25 weeks of pregnancy, would have a baby before I even reached my third trimester – I’m not sure I would have believed it. And yet, it happens, WAY more than it should. Yes, it sometimes happens to moms who don’t have access to good prenatal care. But it also happens to moms who do take care of themselves, who get prenatal care… moms like me.

In this day and age, where doctors can predict, know, and treat so much, the miracles of fertility, pregnancy and prematurity are still mysteries in a lot of ways. In our case, we still don’t know for sure why Charlie came early – and why there were no advance signs that gave the doctors any chance to prepare him for an untimely arrival.

My “incompetent cervix” (worst medical term ever, by the way) was part of the problem, but the fact that my body was contracting and ready to birth a baby at just 25 weeks was another, totally unexplained, part of the problem. And between the time I walked to the hospital that morning and he was born that afternoon, there just wasn’t enough time for them to do anything to keep him inside a few more precious days. Those days really are precious, too. That early in gestation, every week increases the chances of survival a lot, and likely reduces the number of complications the baby is going to face. Unfortunately for us, by the time they knew I was in labor, there was no stopping it or even slowing it down.

Our story has a happy ending – at least at this point! Our boy is happy, a total handful, and most importantly, healthy – for the most part, although the hacking cough he has right now might indicate otherwise. Today I picked him up from school, and he and his best buddy (another Charlie) wanted to run wild on the playground a bit before heading home – all that time sitting in a classroom is hard on a first grade wild man!  So they ran – and then they both planted themselves on a bench and coughed and coughed, like little old men. The common thread? Both are preemies. Coincidence that they’re the ones hacking when the other kids are running non-stop?  I think not. I think these former preemie lungs seem to be more impacted by this unusually warm, moist fall we’re having – and by pollen-heavy springs, and pollution, etc. Though our boy grows and grows, his premature past still rears its ugly face here and there.

I recognize that we are CRAZY lucky to have such a vibrant, busy, healthy boy. I think most moms probably reflect all the time on their kids’ successes and strengths and feel pride and joy. But for me, there’s the added reminder of what could have been. I can guarantee you, I take none of these skills and accomplishments for granted. I think ALL THE TIME about the tears I shed over that tiny, struggling baby in the isolette, and how the life I’m living now was the stuff of daydreams back then. And I will never forget where we started, and just how far he’s come.Charlie2015

So that’s it, that’s why this month is important to me. Prematurity awareness is important because it helps people realize that it really matters to support the March of Dimes, which works constantly to reduce the numbers of premature babies born every day. And it’s important because it reminds me to be oh so grateful for how far we’ve come, and how many doctors and nurses and therapists and scientists and family and friends have helped us get here.

Marie lives in Alexandria, Virginia, with her husband and Charlie. Charlie was born at 25 weeks and weighed 1 pound 15 ounces at birth. He spent 85 days in the NICU at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, DC.

 

380,000 babies born too soon in the U.S.

Friday, November 6th, 2015

WPD-2015-Report-Card-MapThis year, the United States received a “C” on the March of Dimes 2015 Premature Birth Report Card. Although the overall rate of preterm birth dropped to 9.6% in 2014, 1 in 10 babies in the U.S. is born too soon. And despite the decline, the U.S. preterm birth rate continues to rank among the worst of high-income countries.

Four states received an “A” on the report card—Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Vermont. All of these states had a preterm birth rate of 8.1% or less. Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and Puerto Rico all received an “F.” Their preterm birth rates were 11.5% or greater.

For the first time this year, in addition to grading states, the report card graded cities and counties around the nation. This additional analysis showed persistent racial, ethnic, and geographic disparities. According to the report card, Portland, Oregon has the best preterm birth rate at 7.2%, earning that city an “A” on the report card. However, Shreveport, Louisiana has the worst preterm birth rate and received an “F” for its 18.8% rate.

Check out the grade for your state and the top 100 cities with the most births nationwide.

The March of Dimes has set a new goal to lower the national preterm birth rate to 8.1% by 2020 and to 5.5% by 2030. Reaching the 2020 goal of 8.1% will mean that 210,000 fewer babies will be born preterm and achieving the 2030 goal will mean 1.3 million fewer babies will be born preterm saving about $70 billion.

“This aggressive goal can be achieved by increasing best practices in preconception and pregnancy care, wider use of proven interventions such as progesterone and birth spacing, and funding discovery research through our research centers,” says Dr. Jennifer L. Howse, president of the March of Dimes.

Continued research to identify new medical advances to prevent preterm birth is necessary in order to reach the new goal. The March of Dimes supports a nationwide network of five cutting-edge, team-based research centers seeking to find the unknown causes of preterm birth and ways to prevent it.

November is Prematurity Awareness Month and World Prematurity Day (WPD) will be observed on November 17 by the March of Dimes and partner organizations worldwide. Activities in honor of WPD are expected in about 100 countries. Join us for Twitter chats throughout the month and the 24-hour #worldprematurityday Buzzday on November 17th.