Archive for the ‘MOD’ Category

Vote for us in Healthline’s Best Health Blog Contest

Friday, November 25th, 2016

We’re thrilled! News Moms Need has been nominated in Healthline’s “Best Health Blog Contest.” Now, we need your votes to win.

Won’t you take a moment each day, from now until December 12th, to cast your vote for us? It’s simple:

2016 Healthline winner widgetWe were grateful when we were selected as a winner in Healthline’s Best Pregnancy Blogs earlier this year.  Now, Healthline’s Best Health Blog award would be an even greater honor, especially as we cover topics from preconception to childbirth, to babies with special needs and staying safe from Zika.

Our goal is to keep you and your family healthy  – all News Moms Need!

We’d love to receive this award. But most of all, we’d love to know that you support our blog.

Thanks so much in advance for voting.

Your bloggers,

Barbara, Sara and Lauren

 

 

March of Dimes honors CDC Director for work protecting moms and babies from Zika

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Dr. Frieden, Dir. CDCToday, Dr. Frieden received the March of Dimes President’s Leadership Award for serving as a champion in the fight against Zika. This award is given to acknowledge very high levels of achievement in preventing birth defects, premature birth, and infant mortality. Dr. Frieden is receiving it for his outstanding leadership in combatting Zika and raising public awareness of its threat to newborn health.

The March of Dimes and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have been working together for many years to protect moms, babies and families from diseases and to promote good health. Since the Zika outbreak, March of Dimes and CDC have joined forces to spread the word about the devastating impact of this virus on pregnant women and babies.

Thomas Frieden, MD, MPH, Director of the CDC, is at the helm focusing national and global attention on this virus. Zika can cause microcephaly and other brain problems, and is linked to miscarriage and stillbirth.

Dr. Howse, President of March of Dimes says “We’re giving Dr. Frieden this award to show our gratitude for his dedication to preventing Zika virus infection during this epidemic. His decisive actions and strong voice for protecting women and families from serious birth defects caused by Zika are at the heart of our mission.”

Thank you Dr. Frieden. Together we will continue educating the public on how they can protect themselves from Zika.

To learn more about the Zika virus – where it is in the world, its impact on pregnant women and babies, and what you can do to stay safe – visit marchofdimes.org/zika.

If you have questions, send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We’re here to help.

 

Give them tomorrow

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

Give them tomorrowToday is an important one here at the March of Dimes.

Today we launch our new campaign, Give them tomorrow, to raise awareness and funds to fight birth defects and premature birth, the #1 killer of babies in the United States.

This campaign is different. You have the opportunity to help give a fighting chance for every baby by:

  • sending a message of hope to a family of a baby in the NICU (newborn intensive care unit), which the March of Dimes will hand-deliver.
  • sharing your baby’s first milestones at #babysfirst with our social community.
  • engaging with us on World Prematurity Day, November 17th to raise awareness and learn about the cutting edge prematurity research that saves babies’ lives.

We have set a goal to generate 380,000 actions to save babies’ lives, to symbolize the 380,000 babies born too soon each year in the U.S. That’s 1 in 10 babies born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy). This rate is higher than most other high-resource nations.

Even babies born just a few weeks too soon can face serious health challenges and are at risk for lifelong disabilities including breathing problems, vision loss, cerebral palsy, developmental delays and intellectual disabilities. The problem of prematurity involves babies being born too soon and often with birth defects and complications that affect them for life — that’s if they make it through the first critical days and weeks. There are so many challenges for these babies and their families from day one that tomorrow is a dream.

Give them tomorrow is supported by our corporate partners who are committed to saving babies’ lives. Partners in 2016 include Mud Pie, Philips Avent, Famous Footwear, ALEX AND ANI, ALDI, Bon-Ton, and Anthem Foundation.

Won’t you join us today as we make a difference in the lives of all babies?

Together we can give them tomorrow by doing something today.

 

We're in this together

 

The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. For more than 75 years, moms and babies have benefited from March of Dimes research, education, vaccines, and breakthroughs. For the latest resources and health information, visit marchofdimes.org and nacersano.org. You can also find us on Facebook or follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

News Moms Need and @modhealthtalk win awards!

Friday, June 10th, 2016

s2016_dha_winner_printAw-shucks – the News Moms Need blog and @modhealthtalk Twitter handle each received a MERIT award in the 2016 Digital Health Awards competition! News Moms Need received the award in the Publications category while @modhealhtalk received the award in the Social Media category. Both the blog and Twitter account have won awards in prior years; we are happy to be honored once again.

As you probably are already aware, this blog provides posts on topics including preconception health, pregnancy, postpartum, prematurity, life in the NICU, infant health, birth defects, parenting a child with a disability, and infant loss. It covers everything from how to choose a sunscreen during pregnancy to understanding pregnancy risks and complications. Our team of bloggers seeks to present evidenced-based information in a conversational manner.

The @modhealthtalk Twitter handle specializes in providing up to date health content to consumers and engages them in Twitter chats on various topics related to the mission of the March of Dimes. If you are not currently following us on Twitter, please do!

The Digital Health Awards contest honors “the world’s best digital health resources.” Hundreds of local, state and national health-related organizations and companies enter the competition. March of Dimes is in good company, as winners include American Academy of Pediatrics, American Heart Association, Cigna, Cleveland Clinic, Drugs.com, GlaxoSmithKline, Health Net, Inc., Johns Hopkins Health System, National Cancer Institute, Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Sharecare among others.

The March of Dimes is proud to be recognized once again as being among the best in the consumer health education field.

Crazy luck – one mom’s story

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015
CharlieNICU (2)Today, in recognition of World Prematurity Day, we are honored to share this post written by a mom of a preemie about what Prematurity Awareness Month means to her.

Lots of people don’t know what it means to have a premature baby. I didn’t know either, before I had my baby. Charlie was born  at 25 weeks, weighing 1 pound 15 ounces.

If you had told me that I, a healthy person with not a single complication in my first 25 weeks of pregnancy, would have a baby before I even reached my third trimester – I’m not sure I would have believed it. And yet, it happens, WAY more than it should. Yes, it sometimes happens to moms who don’t have access to good prenatal care. But it also happens to moms who do take care of themselves, who get prenatal care… moms like me.

In this day and age, where doctors can predict, know, and treat so much, the miracles of fertility, pregnancy and prematurity are still mysteries in a lot of ways. In our case, we still don’t know for sure why Charlie came early – and why there were no advance signs that gave the doctors any chance to prepare him for an untimely arrival.

My “incompetent cervix” (worst medical term ever, by the way) was part of the problem, but the fact that my body was contracting and ready to birth a baby at just 25 weeks was another, totally unexplained, part of the problem. And between the time I walked to the hospital that morning and he was born that afternoon, there just wasn’t enough time for them to do anything to keep him inside a few more precious days. Those days really are precious, too. That early in gestation, every week increases the chances of survival a lot, and likely reduces the number of complications the baby is going to face. Unfortunately for us, by the time they knew I was in labor, there was no stopping it or even slowing it down.

Our story has a happy ending – at least at this point! Our boy is happy, a total handful, and most importantly, healthy – for the most part, although the hacking cough he has right now might indicate otherwise. Today I picked him up from school, and he and his best buddy (another Charlie) wanted to run wild on the playground a bit before heading home – all that time sitting in a classroom is hard on a first grade wild man!  So they ran – and then they both planted themselves on a bench and coughed and coughed, like little old men. The common thread? Both are preemies. Coincidence that they’re the ones hacking when the other kids are running non-stop?  I think not. I think these former preemie lungs seem to be more impacted by this unusually warm, moist fall we’re having – and by pollen-heavy springs, and pollution, etc. Though our boy grows and grows, his premature past still rears its ugly face here and there.

I recognize that we are CRAZY lucky to have such a vibrant, busy, healthy boy. I think most moms probably reflect all the time on their kids’ successes and strengths and feel pride and joy. But for me, there’s the added reminder of what could have been. I can guarantee you, I take none of these skills and accomplishments for granted. I think ALL THE TIME about the tears I shed over that tiny, struggling baby in the isolette, and how the life I’m living now was the stuff of daydreams back then. And I will never forget where we started, and just how far he’s come.Charlie2015

So that’s it, that’s why this month is important to me. Prematurity awareness is important because it helps people realize that it really matters to support the March of Dimes, which works constantly to reduce the numbers of premature babies born every day. And it’s important because it reminds me to be oh so grateful for how far we’ve come, and how many doctors and nurses and therapists and scientists and family and friends have helped us get here.

Marie lives in Alexandria, Virginia, with her husband and Charlie. Charlie was born at 25 weeks and weighed 1 pound 15 ounces at birth. He spent 85 days in the NICU at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, DC.

 

380,000 babies born too soon in the U.S.

Friday, November 6th, 2015

WPD-2015-Report-Card-MapThis year, the United States received a “C” on the March of Dimes 2015 Premature Birth Report Card. Although the overall rate of preterm birth dropped to 9.6% in 2014, 1 in 10 babies in the U.S. is born too soon. And despite the decline, the U.S. preterm birth rate continues to rank among the worst of high-income countries.

Four states received an “A” on the report card—Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Vermont. All of these states had a preterm birth rate of 8.1% or less. Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and Puerto Rico all received an “F.” Their preterm birth rates were 11.5% or greater.

For the first time this year, in addition to grading states, the report card graded cities and counties around the nation. This additional analysis showed persistent racial, ethnic, and geographic disparities. According to the report card, Portland, Oregon has the best preterm birth rate at 7.2%, earning that city an “A” on the report card. However, Shreveport, Louisiana has the worst preterm birth rate and received an “F” for its 18.8% rate.

Check out the grade for your state and the top 100 cities with the most births nationwide.

The March of Dimes has set a new goal to lower the national preterm birth rate to 8.1% by 2020 and to 5.5% by 2030. Reaching the 2020 goal of 8.1% will mean that 210,000 fewer babies will be born preterm and achieving the 2030 goal will mean 1.3 million fewer babies will be born preterm saving about $70 billion.

“This aggressive goal can be achieved by increasing best practices in preconception and pregnancy care, wider use of proven interventions such as progesterone and birth spacing, and funding discovery research through our research centers,” says Dr. Jennifer L. Howse, president of the March of Dimes.

Continued research to identify new medical advances to prevent preterm birth is necessary in order to reach the new goal. The March of Dimes supports a nationwide network of five cutting-edge, team-based research centers seeking to find the unknown causes of preterm birth and ways to prevent it.

November is Prematurity Awareness Month and World Prematurity Day (WPD) will be observed on November 17 by the March of Dimes and partner organizations worldwide. Activities in honor of WPD are expected in about 100 countries. Join us for Twitter chats throughout the month and the 24-hour #worldprematurityday Buzzday on November 17th.

March of Dimes remembers helping families during Hurricane Katrina

Friday, August 28th, 2015

A guest post by Capi Landreneau, Director, Mobile Health Care for March of Dimes and former Director of Program Services for the Louisiana Chapter.

Mobile UnitToday, we acknowledge the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, a storm with devastating effects that left many without adequate care in so many ways. In the days immediately following landfall, March of Dimes volunteers and staff members were on the ground supporting families, mothers and infants.

We visited shelters in search of pregnant women and mothers in need, we convened community partners to see how we could work together in such a difficult time, we communicated with the national office advising them of the day to day needs and changes in the landscape from safety, to transportation to food shortages. Other staff traveled from New York to Louisiana to assist and slept on the floors of local staff member’s homes, in some cases having never met before.

The outpouring of support from our volunteers around the nation was incredible. Volunteers around the country gathered in groups and assembled care kits for new moms that were evacuated from hospitals. Each kit was personally assembled with comfort items, baby supplies and a handwritten note signed lovingly by a mom from another state — not a friend or family member, but a stranger who just wanted to provide comfort and care in a time when so many felt helpless.

The Louisiana March of Dimes office was literally taken over by donations and hurricane relief work. We had never done anything like that before but we also had never experienced an event like Hurricane Katrina. We distributed donated diapers and formula, we helped families with infants find shelter in places suitable for young families.

General shelters weren’t appropriate for small children running around and women’s shelters didn’t allow husbands. I remember well one family that had twin infants that couldn’t have been more than a month old. They were born prematurely and I remember our concern for their still fragile immune systems in a large shelter. We pooled contacts and several entities came together to support a family specific shelter. I will never forget the look on the mother’s face when we brought her to the shelter that was safe for her toddler to run around, safe for her preemie twins and also allowed her husband to remain with the family. It was only one family on that day, but it felt like we changed the world.

We have a very specific mission – moms and babies. A hospital or other agency would call and we would be tasked to brainstorm options, identify placement for women with infants and/or fill needs that no other agency was addressing. At that time there were no preparations for infants in a massive shelter where water wasn’t safe or abundant. We rallied the volunteers and arranged for single serve (no fridge for storage), ready to feed (no water), disposable (no place to sanitize) formula. We aided hundreds of infants and pregnant women and their families.

As weeks passed and recovery work continued, March of Dimes received a call directly from one of our longtime supporters in New Orleans, who expressed a clear need for “bricks and mortar.” Providers were ready but locations for provision of services were scarce due to the devastation and flooding throughout the area.

March of Dimes established The Hurricane Assistance Fund and raised over $5 million to support recovery efforts. The funding allowed for the design and purchase of four vehicles tailored specifically for provision of care of women and infants along with operational funding for several years.

In September of 2006, the first Mom & Baby Mobile Health Center was launched. The mobile health clinic was equipped to provide full prenatal care onsite without any need for land based support. It served moms and babies in New Orleans during the difficult years following the devastation incurred after Hurricane Katrina made landfall. The mobile clinic relocated regularly in the years following launch as areas began to revive and residents returned to their homes. This allowed the health center to go where the women were in greatest need.

Our second program launched on the Mississippi gulf coast. Serving moms and babies was critical as providers returned to flooded clinics and buildings swept off their foundations by storm surge. The Mom & Baby Mobile Health Center partnered with K-mart, one of our long standing supporters, to provide access to care in their store parking lots. Two additional locations were launched in Louisiana, Lake Charles and a second program in New Orleans to meet the increasing need as residents returned to the city. Since the program was launched, Mom & Baby Mobile Health Centers has provided over 35,000 care encounters to women and infants in Louisiana and Mississippi.

Like so many people living in or touched by Louisiana, I have many emotions today, but what I will focus on will be the incredible outpouring of love and support that we received from strangers all committed to a common cause – healthy moms and babies. I’ll verbalize once again the joy, pride and satisfaction that I feel each time I am reminded that I work for an organization that did what needed to be done in such an outstanding way with such amazing and selfless staff and volunteers. I’m so glad I have the privilege of working for March of Dimes for 11 years, the last 9 of which I’ve spent working with the Mom & Baby Mobile Health Centers. They are a wonderful legacy of March of Dimes’ commitment to support Louisiana and Mississippi in their recovery after Hurricane Katrina.

Thank you, March of Dimes and thank you volunteers — YOU made a difference then and you continue to make a difference NOW. On behalf of Louisiana mothers and infants – we are forever grateful for your generosity and care.IMG_7274

A woman’s microbiome may influence her chance of giving birth early

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

research_birthdefectsresearch_rdax_50Last week, the March of Dimes announced that investigators from the Stanford Prematurity Research Center published an important study which may help to better understand some of the factors that may play a role in premature birth.

Researchers at Stanford have been looking into how the microbiomes of women who deliver babies early are different from those who have full-term births. The microbiome is a community of microorganisms (such as bacteria) in the body. Differences in the microbiomes of individuals may help explain why some women give birth early. Microbiome differences may also explain other health issues, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.

Weekly samples were taken of the bacteria from the teeth, gums, saliva, reproductive tract, and stool from 49 pregnant women. Scientists found little change in the bacterial communities in each woman, week to week at each location. But they did find that microbial communities in the reproductive tracts of women who delivered their babies too soon were different from those of women who delivered full term. Those differences were identified early in the pregnancies and continued throughout the pregnancies.

“These findings may help us screen women and identify and predict those who are more likely to have a baby born too soon,” said David Relman, MD, a professor of microbiology, immunology, and of medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the lead investigator for the research center on this project.

The researchers also found that the women’s microbiomes changed immediately after they delivered their babies, and did not revert back to pre-pregnancy patterns in some cases until at least a year later. “This might explain why women with closely spaced pregnancies have a higher risk of preterm birth,” said Dr. Relman.

The March of Dimes currently has five prematurity research centers. These unique, transdisciplinary centers bring together scientists from many diverse disciplines — geneticists, molecular biologists, epidemiologists, engineers, computer scientists, and others — to work together to find answers to prevent premature birth.

Questions? Text or email them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Our fifth prematurity research center has launched!

Monday, June 15th, 2015

AA010686The new collaborative, which launched earlier this month includes the University of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and Duke University School of Medicine. The researchers will work to identify genes that help to make sure a woman has a full-term pregnancy. They are also looking at how stress, including how a woman’s lifelong exposure to discrimination or poverty, may influence those genes.

The March of Dimes has invested a total of $75 million over 10 years towards five research centers. Each center will focus on different aspects of the causes of preterm birth in the hopes of preventing women from going into labor too early. Babies born too early can face serious long-term health problems.

Our first center opened at Stanford University School of Medicine in California in 2011, followed by the Ohio Collaborative, a partnership of universities in Cincinnati, Columbus and Cleveland, Ohio, which launched in 2013. In November of last year we launched our third and fourth centers at Washington University, St. Louis Children’s Hospital in Missouri and at the University of Pennsylvania respectively.

All five of our prematurity research centers will work together and share findings to determine the cause of preterm birth so that more babies can have a healthy start. Learn more about our newest research collaborative here.

Celebrating Virginia Apgar

Friday, June 5th, 2015

virginia_apgarHave you heard of the APGAR score? It is the very first test given to your baby. The APGAR score was developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, an obstetrical anesthesiologist, in 1952. It is still used all over the world to quickly evaluate a baby after birth. Dr. Apgar is also a pivotal figure in the history of the March of Dimes. She served as the first Medical Director and she helped to redirect the March of Dimes mission from polio to birth defects and other infant health problems, including premature birth.

What is the APGAR score?

The APGAR score is designed to check your baby’s condition at 1 minute and 5 minutes after birth. Your baby is checked for five things:
A – Appearance; skin color
P – Pulse rate
G – Grimace; reflex (measured by placing a bulb syringe in the baby’s nose and seeing the response)
A – Activity; muscle tone
R – Respiration

Each category is given a score ranging from 0-2. The numbers are then added up for a final score. Babies who receive an APGAR score of 7 or more probably have come through delivery fine and are in good condition. A score of less than 7 quickly indicates whether the newborn needs special observation or, perhaps, medical attention to address or prevent a more serious problem. The baby can be referred to the appropriate specialist within moments of birth. The swift medical attention may be a lifesaver.

While the APGAR score is an accurate and very helpful tool for medical personnel it cannot predict how healthy your baby will be in the future. It simply evaluates how your baby is responding after the birth process and if he may need some additional assistance as he adapts to his new environment.

The strength of the APGAR score is its simplicity. While the score has been refined over the past 60 years, it has rarely been improved.

Dr. Apgar and the March of Dimes

Dr. Apgar joined the March of Dimes in 1959. After a severe epidemic of rubella (German measles) in 1964 and 1965 that resulted in thousands of birth defects and fetal deaths, she initiated March of Dimes programs to promote rubella immunization. She also promoted the effective use of Rh immune globulin in pregnant women to prevent hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh incompatibility.

In 1972, Dr. Apgar helped to convene the first Committee on Perinatal Health. A joint effort of the American Medical Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the March of Dimes, this committee developed a plan to improve maternal-fetal health and reduce infant mortality. In 1976, the committee produced the landmark study, Toward Improving the Outcome of Pregnancy, which set forth a model for the regionalization of perinatal care in the United States.

June 7th is Dr. Apgar’s birthday. Dr. Apgar is remembered as a caring, enthusiastic teacher, colleague, and physician. Her enduring legacy still influences the mission of the March of Dimes today and her accomplishments continue to improve the health of babies all over the world.