Archive for the ‘Pregnancy’ Category

Due to changing hormones during pregnancy, dental care should be a priority

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Smiling pregnant woman lying on couchPregnancy is a time of many changes to your body. Some are exciting and amazing, while others are not as much fun. Did you know that because your hormone levels increase, your gums and teeth may change during pregnancy? You’re more likely to have some dental health problems that you did not have before you became pregnant.

Changes in hormone levels can affect your body’s response to dental plaque bacteria, causing swelling, sensitivity and tenderness in your gums. Most pregnant women have some bleeding of their gums, especially while brushing or flossing. Your gums are more likely to become inflamed or infected. Gum inflammation is called “gingivitis;” it’s an early form of periodontal disease, which can ultimately result in tooth loss or other oral health problems.  Other dental issues that may occur include loose teeth, tooth decay or loss, and lumps or non-cancerous tumors which form on gums in-between teeth. Also, you may notice that your mouth produces more saliva.

Here’s what can do if you are pregnant:

Step up your oral care routine; fight plaque at home every day.

Use a soft-bristled toothbrush and brush thoroughly twice a day. If you have a lot of sensitivity, try using toothpaste designed for sensitive gums. If your gums hurt after brushing, apply ice to soothe the pain.

Make sure the toothpaste and mouthwash you use fight gingivitis. Read product labels as many toothpastes and mouthwashes do not contain gingivitis fighting ingredients. A toothpaste containing stannous fluoride is a great choice as it not only fights cavities and sensitivity, but also helps reduce gingivitis. Floss once a day to clean in between your teeth. If you’re vomiting (so sorry), be sure to rinse your mouth with water or clean your teeth afterward to get rid of extra stomach acids in your mouth.

Cut down on sweets

Candy, cookies, cake, soft drinks and other sweets can contribute to gum disease and tooth decay. Instead, have fresh fruit or make other healthy choices to satisfy your sweet tooth. Watch out for some dried fruits, like raisins and figs, that can stick in the crevasses of your teeth. They’re delicious but contain lots of natural sugar, so remember to brush!

Get regular dental care

If left unchecked, some conditions, like gingivitis, may lead to more serious gum disease. Be sure to have a dental checkup early in pregnancy to help your mouth remain healthy. You may even want to see your dentist more often than usual. Although it’s best to have your teeth cleaned and checked for any trouble spots before pregnancy, being pregnant is no reason to avoid your dentist.

Don’t put off dental work until after delivery

Decaying teeth can cause infection that could harm your baby. If you think you need a dental filling, don’t panic. Go get it checked out. Always be sure to tell your dentist that you’re pregnant and how far along you are in your pregnancy.

Bottom line

A good daily oral care routine, keeping up with seeing your dentist, and regular visits to your prenatal care provider are all essential parts of a healthy pregnancy.

Looking for more information? Learn how pregnancy affects your dental health and check out if you are at risk for gum disease.

Have questions? Text or email them to

March of Dimes does not endorse specific brands or products.

Grieve and connect during Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

Pregnancy and Infant loss awareness dayThe loss of a baby is one of the most painful things that can happen to a family. If your baby died during pregnancy, in the first days of life, or even as a toddler, you and your family may need help to understand what happened. You may need support to find ways to deal with your grief and ease your pain.

October is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month – a time to pause and remember all angel babies. It is also SIDS Awareness Month (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome).

It is important to know that parents and families are not alone in their grief. Connecting with others going through the same or a similar situation can help you process your grief. We invite all families to share and connect in our online community Share Your Story. The families in our community know what you are going through and can offer support during this devastating time and in the days ahead.

We provide resources that may help you understand what happened and how to deal with the daily pain of your loss. We encourage you to visit our website if you are looking for resources for families that have lost a baby, ways to remember your baby, or other resources.

If you would like to receive our free bereavement materials, email us at with your mailing address.

The March of Dimes is so very sorry for your loss. We are here for you.


If I had CMV in a previous pregnancy will I get it again in my next pregnancy?

Monday, October 17th, 2016

This is a question we frequently receive through

2014d037_1623Cytomegalovirus (also called CMV) is a kind of herpesvirus. You can get CMV by coming in contact with bodily fluids (like saliva, semen or urine) from a person who carries the virus. Women usually get infected by having sex with someone who has CMV, but many become infected by having contact with young children who have CMV. As many as 70 percent of children between 1 and 3 years of age who go to daycare may have CMV.

CMV is the most common virus passed from mothers to babies during pregnancy; you have a 1 in 3 chance of passing it to your baby (33 percent). Most babies born with CMV don’t have health problems caused by the virus. However, for some babies, CMV can cause conditions like microcephaly.

Many women who have had CMV in a pregnancy, express concern that they might become infected with CMV again, in another pregnancy. If you’ve already had it, you don’t need to worry about getting CMV again. Once you’ve had CMV, it stays in your body for life. During pregnancy your body produces antibodies against the virus which protect your baby from a more serious illness. In rare cases, you can still pass it to your baby, but it usually doesn’t cause any harm.

If you have concerns, speak with your health care provider.

Still have questions? Text or email us at


CDC’s 8 fast facts about Zika if you’re pregnant or trying to conceive

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

microcephalyIf you get infected with Zika during pregnancy, you can pass it to your baby. Zika infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects such as microcephaly, and other brain problems. Here’s what the CDC wants you to know:

1. All pregnant women in the United States should be assessed for possible Zika virus exposure and signs or symptoms of Zika during each prenatal care visit.

2. The most common symptoms of Zika virus are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (also known as pink eye). Other symptoms could include muscle pain and headache.

3. Zika virus is most commonly spread through mosquito bites.

4. Zika virus may be passed through sex by a person who carries the virus, even if he or she never develops symptoms.

5. For women and men who have been diagnosed with Zika, have symptoms, or have had possible exposure to the Zika virus, CDC recommends that women wait at least 8 weeks before trying to get pregnant, and that men wait at least 6 months before trying to get their partner pregnant.

6. In addition to microcephaly, doctors have found other problems among babies infected with Zika virus before birth, such as missing or poorly developed brain structures, defects of the eye, hearing problems, and impaired growth.

7. Zika also may be linked to miscarriage and stillbirth.

8. Zika virus has been found in breast milk, but there are no reports of babies getting infected with Zika from breastfeeding.

Researchers are collecting data to better understand the extent of the Zika virus’ impact on mothers and their babies.

Share these facts with friends, family, and coworkers. For more information about Zika, please visit or our web article. 

Thanks to the CDC for sharing these facts, so you can protect yourself and your family from Zika.

Photo courtesy of CDC.

Have questions? Text or email 

If my first baby has a congenital heart defect, what are the chances my second baby will have one, too?

Friday, September 30th, 2016

pregnant mom with childThis is a question we received through from a mom who is pregnant with her second baby. Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common types of birth defects and if you already have a child with a CHD, you may wonder if your second child will have the same defect. The answer, though, is not a simple “yes” or “no.”

We don’t know the cause of most congenital heart defects. For some babies, their heart defects were caused by changes in their chromosomes or genes (which are passed from parents to children). Researchers have found about 40 gene changes (also called mutations) that cause heart defects. About 30 in 100 babies (30 percent) with a heart defect also have a chromosomal condition or a genetic condition. So if you, your partner or one of your other children has a congenital heart defect, your baby may be more likely to have one, too.

But CHDs are also thought to be caused by a combination of genes and other factors, such as things in your environment, your diet, any medications you may be taking, and health conditions you may have. Conditions like diabetes, lupus, rubella and even obesity can play a role in causing CHDs.

So what is your risk?

The chance of having another child with a CHD depends on many factors. It is best to meet with your health care provider and a genetic counselor who can better assess your risk. A genetic counselor is a person who is trained to help you understand how genes, birth defects and other medical conditions run in families, and how they can affect your health and your baby’s health.

Still have questions? Email or text us at


Travel, Zika, and pregnant women: what you need to know

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

If you are pregnant or trying to conceive, don’t travel to a Zika-affected area. Dr. Siobhan Dolan, Medical Advisor to the March of Dimes, explains why in this short video. Be sure to check CDC’s travel alerts for updates. If you must travel, talk to your health care provider before you travel and learn how to protect yourself from Zika.


Have questions? Send them to

Infant mortality. These two words should never go together.

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

emotional couple sittingInfancy should mark the beginning of life, not the end. Even though the rates of infant deaths are at an all-time low, far too many babies still die before their first birthday. For this reason, September is Infant Mortality Awareness Month – a time for us to share the sad fact that babies still die in infancy, and to help spread the word about how to fix this problem.

In 2013, in the United States, 23,446 infants died before reaching their first birthday, which is an infant mortality rate of 6.0 per 1,000 live births. Or, put another way, on an average day in the U.S., 64 babies die before reaching their first birthday.

What causes infant death? Can it be prevented?

“Preterm birth, or being born too early (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), is the biggest contributor to infant death,” according to the CDC. In 2013, about one third (36%) of infant deaths were due to preterm-related causes. Among non-Hispanic black infants, the rate of preterm-related death is three times higher than those of non-Hispanic white infants.

Other causes of infant mortality include low birth weight, birth defects, pregnancy complications for the mother, SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome), and unintentional injuries (accidents). Although the rate of infant deaths in the U.S. has declined by almost 12% since 2003, the death of any infant is still one too many.

Having a healthy pregnancy may increase the chance of having a healthy baby.

A woman can help reduce her risk of giving birth early by getting a preconception checkup, staying at a healthy weight, and avoiding alcohol and street drugs during pregnancy. Spacing pregnancies at least 18 months apart and getting early and regular prenatal care during pregnancy are also key parts of a healthy pregnancy.

It’s part of our mission

The March of Dimes is committed to preventing premature birth, birth defects and infant mortality. It is our hope that through continued research, we will have a positive impact on the lives of all babies so that fewer families will ever know the pain of losing a child.

If you or someone you know has lost a baby, we hope that our online community, Share Your Story, will be a place of comfort and support to you. There, you will find other parents who have walked in your shoes and can relate to you in ways that other people cannot. Log on to “talk” with other parents who will understand.

Even in the year 2016, “the U.S. has one of the highest rates of infant mortality in the industrialized world,” according to NICHQ, the National Institute for Children’s Health Quality.

The March of Dimes is working hard to make this fact history.

Have questions? Send them to our Health Education Specialists at


Staying safe after a flood or other natural disaster

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

rainFlooding can have devastating effects on your home and the community. After a flood or other natural disaster, there may still be many dangers. It is important to take the appropriate precautions when you are returning home or if you are living in a temporary shelter.


  • All hard surfaces, including walls, floors, and counter-tops should be cleaned with soap and water and disinfected with a solution of 1 cup of bleach to 5 gallons of water.
  • Wash all sheets, towels, and clothes in hot water (or have them dry cleaned).
  • Mattresses and furniture should be air dried in the sun and then sprayed with a disinfectant.
  • Any carpeting should be steam-cleaned.
  • Throw away any objects that cannot be cleaned and disinfected.

Health and safety

  • Keep children and pets away from the area until cleanup is complete.
  • Always wash your hands with soap and water after touching anything that has been in flood water or if you touch flood water.
  • Wear waterproof boots, gloves, and goggles during cleanup, especially if there was any contamination with sewage.
  • If you get a deep cut or wound, check with your health care provider to see if a tetanus shot is necessary.
  • Listen for any recommendations from local or state health departments.

If you’re pregnant

  • Drink plenty of bottled water and rest as often as you can.
  • Seek prenatal care, even if it isn’t with your typical provider.  And make sure that the provider is aware of any health conditions that you may have.
  • If you are in a shelter, make sure that the staff knows you are pregnant (or if you think you may be pregnant).
  • If you do not have any prescription medications that you need, contact your provider and the pharmacy to try to get them.
  • Make sure you avoid infections and other exposures that may be harmful. This would include fumes, flood water, and other toxins. Let others do the cleanup.
  • Even though you are taking care of others, make sure you take care of yourself too. Try to find healthy ways to reduce stress and talk to others about your feelings.
  • If you have any signs of preterm labor, call your health care provider or go to a hospital right away.

Other hazards

  • Shut off electrical power, natural gas, or propane tanks to avoid fire, electrocution, or explosions.
  • Avoid downed power lines.
  • If you smell gas or suspect a leak, leave your house right away and notify the gas company and police or fire department. Do not return to your home until you have been told it is safe.
  • Do not operate any gas-powered equipment (such as a generator) indoors. This can cause carbon monoxide to build up inside your home.
  • Avoid swiftly moving water (even if it is shallow). Cars can be swept away quickly. Make sure children do not play in flood water.

The CDC has more information about what to do after a flood. They also have helpful information for children.

Have questions? Email us at

Is it a boy or a girl?

Friday, August 26th, 2016

its-a-girl-storkFinding out the sex of your baby is such an exciting part of pregnancy. While some people choose to be surprised at the time of delivery, many couples want to know the sex of the baby before they give birth. its-a-boy-stork

XX or XY

Your baby’s sex is determined at the moment of conception.  Of the 46 chromosomes that make up your baby’s genetic material, two chromosomes–one from the egg and one from the sperm–determine your baby’s gender.  A woman’s egg contains only X sex chromosomes.  A man’s sperm, however, may contain either an X or Y sex chromosome.  If, at the instant of fertilization, a sperm with an X sex chromosome meets the egg (another X chromosome), your baby will be a girl (XX).  If a sperm containing a Y sex chromosome meets the egg, your baby will be a boy (XY).  It is always the father’s genetic contribution that determines the sex of the baby.

How can I find out the sex of my baby?

Most women find out their baby’s sex during a routine ultrasound in the second trimester—usually between 18-20 weeks.  Traditional ultrasound is approximately 93% to 100% accurate at detecting the baby’s sex. But, just remember that sometimes the sex is not clearly identifiable from an ultrasound. This is usually due to the position of the baby.

While ultrasound is accurate, if you want to be absolutely certain of your baby’s sex, you would need a diagnostic test, such as a CVS (done between 10-12 weeks of pregnancy) or amniocentesis (done between 15-20 weeks of pregnancy). It is important to keep in mind that these prenatal tests are invasive and are done primarily to diagnose certain genetic conditions, such as Down syndrome.

Another way you may find out if you are having a boy or a girl is through cell-free fetal DNA testing (also called noninvasive prenatal testing or NIPT). NIPT tests your blood for your baby’s DNA to see if he may have certain genetic conditions, like Down syndrome. While this test is not used specifically to determine the baby’s sex, it can provide that information. It can be done after 10 weeks of pregnancy.

Did you find out if you were having a boy or a girl? Did you reveal it in a special way? Let us know—we’d love to hear your stories!

Have questions? Email us at

The Zika virus: What we know and what we don’t

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

We know that…

  • Zika infection during pregnancy can be passed to your baby. It can cause a birth defect called microcephaly and other brain problems. Also, Zika may be linked to miscarriage and stillbirth, hearing and vision problems, and joint issues.
  • the Zika virus is spread mostly through the bite of an infected mosquito, but it also can be spread by having sex with someone who is infected, and possibly through blood transfusions. Zika can be spread through laboratory exposure in a health care setting, too.
  • the mosquitoes that live in many parts of the U.S. are capable of spreading the virus if they become infected. They become infected by biting someone who has the virus. At this time, in the continental United States, mosquitoes are spreading the virus in only one area of Florida.
  • infected mosquitoes spread the virus by biting people. Roughly 4 out of 5 people who get the Zika virus don’t have any signs or symptoms and aren’t aware that they have the virus.
  • by applying bug spray/lotion for 3 weeks after you return from a Zika-affected area, or if you were diagnosed with Zika, you will help prevent the spread of Zika to others.

 We don’t know…

  • how often Zika causes microcephaly or birth defects when a baby is exposed to the virus in the womb.
  • if or when mosquitoes in other areas of the U.S. may become infected with Zika and consequently start spreading the virus.
  • when a vaccine will be available.

Here’s what you can do

The March of Dimes #ZAPzika campaign provides essential information on Zika protection that everyone should follow and share:

  1. Use spray, keep mosquitoes away: make sure it’s EPA registered, and contains at least one of mosquito_3Dthe following ingredients: DEET, Picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, para-menthane-diol, or IR3535, which are safe to use during pregnancy. Don’t use products that contain oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol on children younger than 3 years. When applying, always follow the product label directions;  do not put bug spray/lotion under your clothes, and put sunscreen on first (then bug spray/lotion over sunscreen). Find a repellant that is right for you.
  1. Say you will, embrace the chill: use air conditioning and window screens if possible. Repair holes on screens.
  1. If it’s wet, it’s a threat: remove still water. Mosquitoes can breed in tiny amounts of water. To prevent water from pooling and becoming mosquito breeding grounds, the CDC says “Once a week, empty and scrub, turn over, cover, or throw out items that hold water, such as tires, buckets, planters, toys, pools, birdbaths, flowerpots, or trash containers.”
  1. Get protected, not infected: wear clothes to prevent bites, such as long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, socks, shoes, and a hat. If you or your partner may be infected with Zika, use a barrier method (like a condom) every time you have sex or don’t have sex at all.
  1. If you suspect, then connect: call your health care provider if you are at risk of infection, or if you think you may have the Zika virus.

If you are thinking about getting pregnant, CDC guidelines suggest waiting at least 6 months from the first sign or symptom if a male partner was diagnosed with the virus, and waiting at least 8 weeks from the first sign or symptom if a woman tested positive for Zika.

If you or your partner may have Zika but neither of you have signs or symptoms and neither of you has been tested, wait at least 8 weeks from when you think you may have been exposed to Zika before trying to get pregnant. Keep in mind that research is ongoing to confirm these waiting times.

If you have questions about Zika, please see our article at or send them to