Archive for the ‘Pregnancy’ Category

Traveling this winter? Be prepared

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

winter blizzardThe holidays are upon us and I’m spending them with friends and family near and far, well, mostly far. I’m starting to plan for my upcoming trip and today I realized the pressure in my tires was low. Thankfully I keep a tire pump in my car so I was able to put air in my tires and be on my way. It’s important to make sure you and your family are ready to hit the roads this holiday season and to be prepared for all kinds of winter weather. Here are some tips to help get you on your way safely.

Prepare your car

• Service the radiator
• Check your antifreeze level
• Use a wintertime formula in your windshield washer.
• Check the tire pressure or, if necessary, replace tires with all-weather or snow tires.
• Try to maintain a full tank of gas to avoid ice in the tank and long fuel lines.

Keep a winter emergency kit in your car that contains:

• Blankets
• Food and water
• Tire pump, booster cables, map, a bag of sand or cat litter for traction
• Flashlight
• Phone charger
• Snow shovel, brush and ice scraper
• Extra baby items, such as diapers, wipes, food, toys and extra clothing

If you are pregnant

• It is important to stay hydrated and have healthy snacks on hand in case you get hungry. Traveling during wintertime can cause unexpected delays, so keep extra water and snacks in your car  to help you make it through any traffic holdup.

If you have little ones

• Before you head out, make sure you strap your little one in his car seat properly. Buckle up and follow our guide to make sure your child is safe and secure.

Check the weather forecast and stay in touch

• Check the weather forecast before your travel so you can dress appropriately. Knowing the temperature and wind chill can help you and your little one avoid hypothermia, frostbite and wind chill. If a storm is coming, try to minimize your travel.
• If you do have to drive somewhere, let someone know when you leave your house and when you expect to arrive. Bridges and overpasses ice over first, so try to stay on main roads and avoid shortcuts.

Whether you are traveling near or far this winter, being prepared will help you travel and arrive safely.

Chickenpox, vaccinations and Angelina Jolie

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

VaccineAngelina Jolie coming down with chickenpox is a good reminder for all of us to keep our vaccinations up to date! Chickenpox, also called varicella, is caused by a virus. Its symptoms include an itchy rash, blisters and fever. And before the varicella vaccine, people usually got chickenpox during childhood. Now, most kids get the vaccine in the first few years of life.

As a kid, I remember getting chickenpox along with several others in my kindergarten class. And as itchy and uncomfortable as I was, I still didn’t get it as bad as my little sister did years later – in fact, she got it twice, but that’s rare! Come to think of it, my sister was slammed three times by the virus when she got shingles last year. That’s right – the virus that causes chickenpox can also cause shingles later in life.

For most of us who were “lucky” enough to catch chickenpox in childhood, we probably don’t have to worry about getting chickenpox in adulthood, like Mrs. Pitt. But if you’ve never had chickenpox or aren’t sure, talk to your provider about getting the varicella vaccine, especially if you’re thinking about getting pregnant. Having chickenpox during pregnancy may cause some babies to get congenital varicella syndrome, a group of birth defects. Not all vaccinations are safe to get during pregnancy, so it’s best to get the varicella vaccine before getting pregnant.

In the meantime, here’s hoping Angelina has a speedy recovery!

Prescription drugs: new FDA labeling rules will help pregnant women

Friday, December 5th, 2014

prescription medsCurrent FDA guidelines about medication safety during pregnancy can be very confusing for women and their health care providers. Soon, however, doctors will have access to more information about the safety of prescription drugs during pregnancy.

When you are pregnant, you try to avoid anything that may harm your baby. But sometimes, you need to take medications for your own health. Managing chronic conditions like diabetes, asthma, and high blood pressure is very important, especially during pregnancy. But it is often difficult to know what medications are safe. And current FDA safety categories can be very confusing and difficult to understand.

However, in the summer of 2015, drug manufacturers will need to start providing additional details about medication safety in pregnant and breastfeeding women. The new labels will have to state how the safety information was obtained and whether the data was the result of scientific studies in people, or if it was obtained through study of animal models. The manufacturers must also include how much of the drug is excreted in breast milk and whether it affects the nursing baby, as well as how the drug may affect future fertility for both men and women of reproductive age.

These changes in labeling will provide doctors with more information about a medication’s safety during pregnancy. The information will not be on the actual medication bottle. It will be included in the official drug labeling information that doctors use when prescribing medications. It may also be included in the printed materials that pharmacies often include when filling prescriptions. This change in labeling does not apply to over-the-counter medications, though.

The new guidelines will allow doctors and patients to weigh the pros and cons of which medication is best to take during pregnancy for a given condition based on scientific evidence. And it will provide doctors and patients with more safety data than has previously been readily available.

The March of Dimes hails the release of the FDA’s final rule on pregnancy and lactation drug labeling information for prescription drugs. According to Dr. Jennifer Howse, president of the March of Dimes the new rules “will drive critical improvement to prescription drug labels regarding known effects on pregnancy, breastfeeding, and fertility.  The rule takes vital steps to improve the organization, readability, and usefulness of this information, which will enable women and their providers to find it and use it more readily….It is important to note, however, that this rule is only a first step, and it does not address other crucial issues related to pregnancy, lactation, and prescription drugs. The March of Dimes looks forward to working with the FDA and other interested stakeholders to ensure that appropriate research is performed and data generated to allow women and their health providers to make fully informed decisions about medication and its expected impact on pregnancy, lactation and childbearing.”

Holidays are a time for family

Monday, November 24th, 2014

Family at Thanksgiving dinnerAnd learning about family health history! I recently visited some relatives that I had not seen in years. After we caught up, they mentioned to me that colon cancer runs in that side of the family. This was news to me, as I did not know much about our family’s health history. At my next doctor’s appointment I told my doctor what I had learned from my relatives, and we made a plan on how to manage my health care going forward.

At Thanksgiving, you may be getting together with your family over a delicious turkey dinner. This is a great time to bring up your family’s health history. You may discover important information to keep in mind at your next doctor’s visit like I did.

On our website, we have a lot of helpful tips on how to talk to family and relatives, how to use the information they share, and what to do if some family members don’t want to talk about their health.  You can also use our Family Health History form to help you start a conversation with your family.

Knowing your family’s health history is helpful, especially if you are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant. If you learn that your family has a health condition that gets passed from parent to child, you may want to see a genetic counselor. This is a person who is trained to help you understand how conditions run in families and how they can affect your health and your baby’s health.

Enjoy spending time with your family this Thanksgiving, and learn about each other’s health at the same time. You may discover a few new things that can help you make healthy decisions for your future.

Are you at risk for premature birth?

Friday, November 14th, 2014

preemie and momHave you had a premature baby in the past? Are you pregnant with twins or other multiples? Do you have problems with your cervix or uterus?  If so, you are more likely to give birth early.

We often get questions from women wondering whether they are at risk to have a premature baby. What makes some women give birth early? We don’t always know what causes preterm labor and premature birth. However, there are some things that we do know make it more likely. These things are called risk factors. Having a risk factor doesn’t mean that you will definitely have preterm labor or give birth early. But it may increase your chances.

These three risk factors make you most likely to have preterm labor and give birth early:
1. Prior premature birth: You’ve had a premature baby in the past.
2. Multiples: You’re pregnant with twins, triplets or more.
3. Cervical or uterine problems: Problems with the structure or function of your cervix or uterus.

Some other risk factors include:

Family history: This means someone in your family (like your mother, grandmother or sister) has had a premature baby. If you were born prematurely, you’re more likely than others to give birth early.

Weight: Being underweight or overweight before pregnancy or not gaining enough weight during pregnancy.

Maternal health conditions, including:
High blood pressure and preeclampsia
Diabetes
Thrombophilias (blood clotting disorders)
o Certain infections during pregnancy, like a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or other infections of the uterus, urinary tract or vagina.

Smoking: Babies born to women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely than babies born to nonsmokers to be born prematurely.

Stress: High levels of stress that continue for a long time may cause health problems.

Maternal age: Being younger than 17 or older than 35 makes you more likely than other women to give birth early.

Race/ethnicity: We don’t know why race plays a role in premature birth; researchers are working to learn more about it.   In the United States, black women are more likely to give birth early, followed by Native American and Hispanic moms.

These are just a few of the risk factors for preterm labor or premature birth. You can see a complete list on our website.

There are some things that ALL women can do to reduce their risk of preterm labor and premature birth:
• Don’t smoke, drink alcohol or take street drugs.
• Make sure you go to all your prenatal care appointments, even if you’re feeling fine. This allows your doctor to detect any problems early.
• Try to get to a healthy weight before your get pregnant. Once you are pregnant, ask your doctor how much weight you should gain.
• Make sure any chronic health conditions are being treated and are under control.
• Protect yourself from infections by washing your hands with soap and water. Know what foods to avoid during pregnancy. Have safe sex. Don’t touch cat feces (waste).
• Try to reduce stress. Make sure you ask for help from family and friends.
• Once you have had your baby, it is best to wait at least 18 to 23 months before getting pregnant again. And make sure you schedule a preconception checkup before your next pregnancy.

If you have concerns about whether you may be at risk for giving birth early, see your health care provider. With guidance and care, you will have a better chance of having a healthy pregnancy.

Have questions? Send them to our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Keeping safe from Ebola

Friday, October 17th, 2014

Lots of people are talking about Ebola. Here’s the deal. Ebola is a rare, but very serious disease caused by a virus. It’s spread by coming in direct contact with body fluids (like blood, breast milk, urine or vomit) from a person sick with the disease. You also can get Ebola if you have direct contact with items, like needles or sheets, that have an infected person’s body fluids on them.

Ebola can start with flu-like symptoms, but over time it can cause more serious health problems. Eventually, it can cause heavy bleeding, organ failure and death. Some research shows that Ebola in pregnancy can cause pregnancy loss.

The question many people have is: how can you keep safe from Ebola? Right now, there’s no vaccine to help prevent Ebola infection, but researchers are working to develop one as well as other treatments. In the meantime, here’s what you can do to help keep you and your family safe:

Wash your hands often! This helps prevent many viruses from spreading, including Ebola.
Avoid travel to places where there are Ebola outbreaks.
• Avoid coming in contact with someone who may be sick.

For the latest news on Ebola, visit the CDC website. Read our article to learn more about Ebola and pregnancy.

Flu is dangerous for certain people

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

You’ve all heard it: get your flu shot. It is on our blog, website, and we just finished a twitter chat with the CDC, FDA, AAP, doctors, and other notable tired-toddlerorganizations. Everyone agrees that getting the flu shot is the single best form of protection from flu.

Is it really that important?

Yes. Flu can be life-threatening. Certain groups of people are at higher risk of serious complications from flu:

• Children younger than 5 years of age and especially kids younger than 2 years old.

• Children of any age with long-term health conditions including developmental disabilities. See this post to learn which high risk conditions are included.

• Children of any age with neurologic conditions. Some children with neurologic conditions may have trouble with muscle function, lung function or difficulty coughing, swallowing, or clearing fluids from their airways. These problems can make flu symptoms worse. Learn more here.

• Pregnant women. They are at high risk of having serious health complications from flu which include miscarriage, preterm labor, premature birth or having a low-birthweight baby. In some cases, flu during pregnancy can even be deadly. By getting a flu shot during pregnancy, your baby will be protected up until six months of age.

•  Adults older than age 65 (attention grandparents!).

When should you talk to your provider?

According to the CDC, you should seek advice from your provider before getting a flu shot if you are allergic to eggs, have had Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), have had a prior severe reaction to the flu shot or to an ingredient in the shot, or are not feeling well.

Bottom line- get your flu shot

Read my post Test your flu knowledge – true or false? to learn the truth about flu.  Knowledge is powerful.

If you have questions, speak with your health care provider or visit flu.gov .
Note: This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need, select “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date.

If you have comments or questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We welcome your input!

International FASD awareness day is today

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

FASD awareness dayFASDs or Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, are a group of conditions that can happen to your baby when you drink alcohol during your pregnancy.

There is no known safe level of alcohol during pregnancy. When you drink alcohol during pregnancy, so does your baby. The alcohol in your blood quickly passes through the placenta and to your baby through the umbilical cord and can seriously harm your baby’s development, both mentally and physically.

Alcohol can also cause your baby to be born too soon or with certain birth defects of the heart, brain or other organs.  He can also be born at a low birthweight or have:

• Vision and hearing problems

• Intellectual disabilities

• Learning and behavior problems

• Sleeping and sucking problems

• Speech and language delays

The good news is that FASDs are 100% preventable. If you avoid alcohol during your pregnancy, your baby can’t have FASDs or any other health conditions caused by alcohol.

If you have been drinking alcohol during pregnancy, it is never too late to stop. Your baby’s brain is growing throughout pregnancy, so the sooner you stop drinking the safer it will be for you and your baby.

For more information about alcohol during pregnancy and how to stop, visit us here.

Have questions? Email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Click here to read more News Moms Need blog posts on: pregnancy, pre-pregnancy, infant and child care, help for your child with delays or disabilities, and other hot topics.

Morning sickness during pregnancy

Monday, September 8th, 2014

pregnant womanThe news of another royal baby on the way has caused a lot of excitement on both sides of the pond. But learning that the Duchess of Cambridge may once again be suffering from morning sickness in her second pregnancy makes me feel deeply for her. I had morning sickness in both of my pregnancies. I remember it being a lot harder to manage the second time around while working and caring for my first child.

Morning sickness is nausea (feeling sick to your stomach) and vomiting that happens during pregnancy, usually in the first few months. It’s also called nausea and vomiting of pregnancy or NVP. Even though it’s called morning sickness, it can last all day and happen any time of day. Mild morning sickness doesn’t harm you or your baby. But if morning sickness becomes severe (called hyperemesis gravidarum), it can lead to weight loss and dehydration (not having enough water in your body). These problems can be harmful during pregnancy.

If you have mild morning sickness, there are some things you can do that may help you feel better, like:

• Keep snacks by your bed. Eat a few crackers before you get up in the morning to help settle your stomach.
Eat five or six small meals each day instead of three larger meals.
• Eat foods that are low in fat and easy to digest, like cereal, rice and bananas. Don’t eat spicy or fatty foods.
• Eat healthy snacks between meals. This helps keep your stomach from being empty and helps prevent feeling sick to your stomach. Try snacks that are high in protein, like milk or yogurt.
• Drink plenty of fluids, especially water.
• Avoid smells that upset your stomach.
• Take your prenatal vitamin at night or with a snack. Sometimes vitamins can upset your stomach.

Talk to your health care provider if you have morning sickness. Your provider may prescribe a medicine to help relieve your nausea. It comes as a tablet that you take every day as long as you have symptoms.

If you have severe morning sickness, you may need treatment in a hospital with intravenous (IV) fluids. These are fluids that are given through a needle into a vein. Signs of severe morning sickness include:

• Vomiting more than 3 to 4 times a day
• Vomiting that makes you dizzy, lightheaded or dehydrated. Signs of dehydration include feeling thirsty, having a dry mouth, having a fast heart beat or making little to no urine.
• Losing more than 10 pounds in pregnancy

Read our article on morning sickness to learn more. Or watch our videos on mild morning sickness and severe morning sickness.

Join our Twitter chat on pregnancy

Monday, August 25th, 2014

Pregnancy chatAre you pregnant? Do you have questions about pregnancy? Join us on Thursday, August 28th at 2pm EDT for a Twitter chat and get your questions answered.

We will be joining the National Institute of Child Health and Human development (@NICHD_NIH) and the Federal Drug Administration Office of Women’s Health (@FDAWomen) to discuss:

• common pregnancy myths
• how to reduce health problems during pregnancy
• how long your pregnancy should last
• important info about labor and delivery

Jump in the conversation any time to ask questions or tell us your story.  Follow #pregnancychat.

We hope to see you then!

If you have questions, feel free to email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Click here to read more News Moms Need blog posts on: pregnancy, pre-pregnancy, infant and child care, help for your child with delays or disabilities, and other hot topics.