Depression during pregnancy: what you need to know

sad woman with coffee mugDepression is a serious medical condition. It is an illness that involves the body, mood and thought. It affects the way a person feels about themselves and the way they think about their life. So many people were shocked and saddened by the news about Robin Williams. But unfortunately, depression is far more common than many of us realize. And regrettably, many people still feel that depression is a sign of weakness and do not recognize it as the biological illness that it is.

As many as 1 out of 5 women have symptoms of depression during pregnancy. For some women, these symptoms are severe. Women who have been depressed before they conceive are at a higher risk of experiencing depression during pregnancy than other women.

Signs of depression
Depression is more than just feeling sad or “blue.” There are physical signs as well. Other symptoms include:
• Trouble sleeping
• Sleeping too much
• Lack of interest
• Feelings of guilt
• Loss of energy
• Difficulty concentrating
• Changes in appetite
• Restlessness, agitation or slowed movement
• Thoughts or ideas about suicide

It may be hard to diagnose depression during pregnancy. Some of its symptoms are similar to those normally found in pregnancy. For instance, changes in appetite and trouble sleeping are common when you are pregnant. Other medical conditions have symptoms similar to those of depression. A woman who has anemia or a thyroid problem may lack energy but not be depressed. If you have any of the symptoms listed, talk to your health care provider.

Treatment options
Since depression is a serious medical condition, it poses risks for you and your baby. But a range of treatments are available. These include therapy, support groups and medications.

It is usually best to work with a team of health care professionals including:
• Your prenatal care provide
• A mental health professional, such as a social worker, psychotherapist or psychiatrist
• The provider who will take care of your baby after birth

Together, you and your medical team can decide what is best for you and your baby.

If you are on medication and thinking about getting pregnant, talk to your doctor. You will need to discuss whether you should keep taking the medication, change the medication, gradually reduce the dose or stop taking it altogether.

If you are taking an antidepressant and find that you are pregnant, do not stop taking your medication without first talking to your health care provider. Call him or her as soon as you discover that you are expecting. It may be unhealthy to stop taking an antidepressant suddenly.

If you or someone you know is experiencing any signs of depression, please talk to your health care provider or someone you trust. Help is available and you can feel better.

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