Prematurity, disabilities and special education

Preemi in NICU_smA mom recently wrote to AskUs inquiring about services for her child who was born 12 weeks early. Her child was now in elementary school, had a hearing impairment, and was falling behind in school. She wanted to know how she could help him.

Research has shown that children born prematurely may have difficulties with learning, experience developmental delays, or have a disability. But, whether your child was born prematurely or not, if he is evaluated and has one of 14 conditions, he may be eligible to receive special education and/or related services. Often, a “developmental delay” is enough for a child age three or older to be eligible for services. In order to qualify, a child’s educational performance must be adversely affected due to the disability.

The 14 qualifying conditions are:

Autism
Deaf-blindness
Deafness
Developmental delay (subject to each state’s specific criteria, and usually only up to age 9 and sometimes younger)
Emotional disturbance
Hearing impairment
Intellectual disability
Multiple disabilities
Orthopedic impairment
Other health impairment
Specific learning disability
Speech or language impairment
Traumatic brain injury
Visual impairment

Next steps

You can request an evaluation (which is free to you) through the special education administrator of your school district or the principal of your local elementary school. Sending the request in writing is always a good idea – such as an email. Then, the school should contact you to set up an appointment for an evaluation.

Learn more about who will test your child, the steps involved in the process and what happens next, in this blog post. If your child qualifies for services, they could be life changing. The first step is to seek help and ask for the evaluation.

Find other relevant posts in our series on Delays and Disabilities: How to get help for your child.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

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