Making vaccines easier for your child

Mom calming crying babyIn recognition of National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), March of Dimes is participating in a blog relay to discuss the critical role vaccines play in protecting children, families, and communities against vaccine-preventable diseases. NIIW is sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). You can follow the NIIW conversation on social media using hashtag #NIIW.

Let’s face it – getting a shot is not a pleasant experience for you or your baby. But making sure your child receives her vaccines to stay healthy is so important! Vaccines allow children to become immune to a disease without actually getting sick from the disease. It is always better to prevent an illness than to treat it after it occurs.

Here are some tips to make getting vaccinations easier:

  • Provide comfort. Keep your baby cuddled in your lap and sing to her. Here are ways to hold your baby or young child while she receives her shot.
  • Bring her favorite toy, book or blanket.
  • Make eye contact with her and tell her everything will be okay.
  • Be honest with your child; tell her the she may feel a pinch, but the shot will keep her healthy.
  • After the shot, hug and praise your child. For your baby, swaddling, breastfeeding or a bottle may offer relief.
  • Before leaving the office, ask your provider to advise you about a non-aspirin pain reliever in case your child is uncomfortable after the shot.

Keep your baby on track

It is important to keep up-to-date with your child’s vaccinations. It may seem like your baby needs many shots, but remember, receiving multiple vaccines at one time does not overload her immune system. Several vaccines contain only a tiny fraction of what your baby is exposed to every day in her environment. And your baby needs more than one dose of certain vaccines because each one builds up her immunity. Here is a complete schedule of your baby’s vaccines along with answers to many of your questions.

Off track? Use this handy tool to help you get back on schedule.

For the top 5 reasons why vaccines are important to your child’s health, see this post. Still got questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Remember: CDC strongly recommends giving babies the recommended immunizations by age two as the best way to protect them from 14 serious childhood diseases, like whooping cough and measles. You can learn more by visiting the CDC website. Be sure to stop by the other #NIIW relay participants’ blogs to learn about the benefits of immunization– tomorrow’s post will be hosted by What to Expect.

 

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