We can’t do it without you

17
Apr
Posted by Sara

Salk newspaperVolunteers have always been an invaluable part of the March of Dimes. From the very earliest days, volunteers have been full partners in the March of Dimes, working to raise funds, heighten awareness and implement critical programs to help support our mission.

In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked the nation to help him find a cure for polio by contributing dimes for the cause and sending them directly to the White House. Within weeks, over 80,000 letters with dimes and dollars flooded the White House mailroom to the extent that official correspondence to the President was literally buried in an avalanche of donations, a total of 2,680,000 dimes or $268,000.

With the funds raised through this annual campaign, the March of Dimes financed much of the research that led to the development of the polio vaccine.  The March of Dimes then organized a massive field trial to prove its effectiveness in the largest peacetime mobilization of volunteers in the history of the United States. And 60 years ago, on April 12, 1955 Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine was declared “safe, effective and potent.” This was a major milestone in the fight against polio.

Over the next few weeks March for Babies events will take place across the country. Approximately 3 million people will join their family, friends and colleagues in nearly 700 communities. These volunteers will walk to give hope to nearly half a million babies born too soon each year. The money raised supports programs in local communities that help moms have healthy, full-term pregnancies. And it funds research to find answers to the problems that threaten our babies. We’ve been walking since 1970 and have raised an incredible $2.3 billion to benefit all babies.

This week is National Volunteer Week and we want to take this moment to thank everyone who has contributed to help us achieve our goals. The efforts of our friends and volunteers are what make this organization strong. We are resolved to push even harder for research into the problems that threaten the health of babies.

To all of our volunteers past and present, from polio to prematurity, we offer our most sincere thanks.

Beech-nut baby food recall

15
Apr
Posted by Ivette
Image Credit: Beech-Nut Nutrition®

–Photo credit: Beech-Nut®–

Beech-Nut Nutrition® is recalling some of its baby food products because they may have small pieces of glass in them.

The recall is for 4 oz. glass jars of Stage 2 Beech-Nut Classics Sweet Potato and Chicken. The recalled products have an expiration date of December 2016 and include product numbers 12395750815 through 12395750821. The recalled baby food was sold in stores nationwide.

If you have Beech-Nut baby food, check the jar and label to see if you have the recalled product. You can return or exchange the recalled baby food at the same store where you bought it. You also can call the Beech-Nut Consumer Hotline at (866) 674-4446.

Visit the U.S. Department of Agriculture website or Beech-Nut website to learn more about the Beech-Nut baby food recall. Learn more about solid foods for your baby.

Do you know your baby’s different cries?

15
Apr
Posted by Barbara

infant cryingYes…babies cry a lot; but, they cry for a reason. Your baby may be hungry, have a dirty diaper or he may not feel well. He may need to burp, have gas in his tummy, or simply need to be cuddled (which is a really good reason to cry). Crying is the only way your baby can tell you that he needs something. It is his language before he can speak.

Soon you will learn to recognize the differences in your baby’s cries. His cries will not all sound the same. The “I’m tired and need to go to sleep” cry will sound different from the “Ouch – my diaper rash hurts” cry. Likewise, the cries due to hunger will sound somewhat different from the cry when a stranger holds your baby. The more you pay attention to the slight variations in cries, the more you will learn to anticipate and react to your baby’s needs.

Do preemies cry more often than full term babies?

Some studies show that premature babies are more likely to be fussy than babies who are born full term. They may be harder to soothe, cry often, and have trouble eating and sleeping. If your baby is fussy, it may be comforting to know that you are not alone. Some babies who have been in the NICU have trouble getting used to the quiet of home. Your baby may sleep better with some background music or a low level of noise in your home.

Remember to never shake your baby when he cries—this can seriously hurt him. If you can’t soothe your baby or you think he cries way too much, talk to his health care provider. Babies can get sick very quickly and the sooner you seek medical attention, the quicker your baby will get better.

What if your baby cries constantly?

Your baby’s doctor can also tell you if he thinks your baby may have colic, which is intense crying lasting more than 3 hours a day. About 1 in 5 babies develop colic – usually between 1 and 4 months of age. They cry constantly, often extending or pulling up their legs or passing gas. Sometimes their tummies are enlarged with air and gas.

There’s no one cause of colic, but there are many different ways to ease your baby’s discomfort. One way is to walk him in a soft-sided baby carrier that you strap to the front of your body. You can also try laying him tummy-down across your knees and gently rubbing his back. The pressure against his tummy may relieve his discomfort.

Breastfeeding moms can ask their baby’s health care providers about a change in food choices or eliminating specific foods that may cause your baby discomfort. Keep in mind that colic usually disappears by 4 months of age, no matter what treatments you try.

Remember Mom

As important as it is to care for your baby, it is also important to care for yourself. Moms of babies who have colic or are very fussy are often sleep deprived. Enlist the help of your partner, relatives and friends, so that you can take time out to sleep, eat well and even go for a stress busting walk. The time you spend nourishing your body and mind will help give you the patience to deal with your crying baby.

For tips on how to soothe your crying baby, visit us.

For more posts on how to help your child with a delay or disability, view our Table of Contents.

 

Alcohol and breastfeeding

13
Apr
Posted by Lauren

Alcohol and BreastfeedingYou have waited many months and finally you have given birth to your beautiful baby! Now you want to celebrate with a glass of champagne, right? Don’t fill up your glass just yet. When you drink alcohol and then breastfeed your baby, she is exposed to a small amount of the alcohol you drink. Your baby eliminates the alcohol from her body at only half the rate you do. Therefore, it stays in your baby’s system, which is not good for her.

Don’t believe the myths

• It was once believed that drinking beer was a way to increase a mother’s milk supply, but that is not true. Research has shown that drinking beer does not increase your milk supply. In fact, drinking alcohol of any kind may decrease the amount of breastmilk your baby drinks. Alcohol can change the taste of your milk, which your baby may not like, and can result in your baby taking in less breastmilk.  Chronic drinking of alcohol may also reduce your milk production.

• Some people believe “pumping and dumping” (expressing breastmilk and then throwing it away instead of giving it to your baby) will get rid of the alcohol from your body quicker, but this is not true either. Pumping and dumping does not have any effect on how quickly alcohol leaves your body. However, if you miss a feeding session due to having had an alcoholic drink, then pumping and dumping will help you maintain your milk supply and avoid engorgement (when your breasts are swollen with milk to the point of hurting).

Bottom line

Avoid alcohol when you’re breastfeeding. However, if you have a drink, allow at least 2 hours per drink before your next breastfeeding or pumping session. This allows your body to have as much time as possible to process the alcohol out of your system before your baby’s next feeding. If you do drink alcohol, don’t have more than two drinks a week (one alcoholic drink is equal to a 12-ounce beer, a 4-ounce glass of wine or 1 ounce of hard liquor.)

You may also want to pump after your feedings when you have not had a drink. This way, you will have extra milk stored to feed your baby if you have been drinking when you need to breastfeed.

You also can pass street drugs, like heroin and cocaine, to your baby through breast milk. Tell your health care provider if you need help to quit using street drugs or drinking alcohol.

Reasons you may need a c-section

10
Apr
Posted by Sara

There are times when your health care provider may recommend a cesarean section (also called c-section). If there are problems with your pregnancy or during labor, you may need to have a c-section to keep you and your baby safe.

In this video of Dr. Siobhan Dolan discusses some of the medical reasons why a c-section may be necessary and what you can expect.

Helping babies with FASD

08
Apr
Posted by Barbara

baby in distress

Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause your baby to have serious health conditions, called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Alcohol can also cause your baby to:

• Be born too soon (prematurely)
• Have birth defects (heart, brain and other organs)
• Have vision or hearing problems
• Be born at low birthweight
• Have intellectual disabilities
• Have learning disabilities
• Have sleeping and sucking problems
• Have speech and language delays
• Have behavioral problems

What can you do?

The earlier a child is diagnosed with FASD, the sooner interventions can begin, and the child can start making progress. Special services that can help a child with FASD include early intervention, special education, speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy and other services. This blog series can help you learn how to access services for babies and toddlers or children ages 3 and older.

Not all babies born with FASD will experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms. According to Mother-to-Baby, “There are reports of withdrawal symptoms in infants whose mothers consumed alcohol near delivery. Symptoms included tremors, increased muscle tone, restlessness and excessive crying…Once your baby is born, it is also recommended you tell your pediatrician about your alcohol use during pregnancy. Your baby can be evaluated for effects of alcohol exposure. Services and support are available for children with alcohol related problems.”

Additional resources

The FASD Center for Excellence has information, including screening, diagnosing, intervention programs and resources.

The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) has a resource list and several fact sheets that may be very helpful to parents of children with FASD, such as FASD Identification.

March of Dimes’ role

In 1973, March of Dimes grantees were the first to link drinking alcohol in pregnancy with a specific pattern of birth defects and intellectual disabilities they called Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Since then grantees have continued to study how alcohol harms the developing brain, and to discover better ways to prevent and treat FASDs in alcohol-exposed babies.

Here is more information, including resources on how to quit drinking alcohol. The good news is that FASD is entirely preventable by avoiding alcohol during pregnancy.

If you have questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. View other posts in the Delays and Disabilities: How to get help for your child series, here.

 

FASDs – what you need to know

06
Apr
Posted by Lauren

Alcohol Awareness MonthIt’s important to stop and think before you drink.

Many women who are pregnant or thinking about pregnancy know that heavy drinking during pregnancy can cause birth defects, but it’s important to note that even light drinking may also harm your developing baby. No level of alcohol use during pregnancy has been proven safe – none. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders or FASDs, which include a wide range of physical and mental disabilities and lasting emotional and behavioral problems in a child.

What happens to your baby when you drink?

When you drink alcohol during pregnancy, so does your baby. The same amount of alcohol that is in your blood is also in your baby’s blood. The alcohol in your blood quickly passes through the placenta and to your baby through the umbilical cord. Although your body is able to manage alcohol in your blood, your baby’s little body isn’t. Your liver works hard to break down the alcohol in your blood. But your baby’s liver is too small to do the same and alcohol can hurt your baby’s development.

That’s why alcohol is much more harmful to your baby than to you during pregnancy.

What should you do?

The good news is that FASDs can be completely avoided. If you had an occasional drink before knowing you were pregnant, chances are it probably won’t harm your baby. But it’s very important that you stop drinking alcohol as soon as you think you might be pregnant.

Also, be sure to get regular prenatal care and tell your health care provider about any concerns you may have.

Bottom line: There is no safe amount of alcohol a pregnant woman can consume. Even a small amount can harm your baby.

April is alcohol Awareness Month – help us get the word out. Stop and think before you drink.

Get your piece of March of Dimes history

03
Apr
Posted by Lauren

2015 MOD Commemorative CoinThe 2015 March of Dimes commemorative coin is here!

This silver dollar coin blends the March of Dimes’ past, present and future and is minted in honor of 75 years of groundbreaking discoveries and innovative programs that continue to improve the lives of families and babies. On one side of the coin is the March of Dimes founder, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, along with scientist Dr. Jonas Salk. In 1938 President FDR founded the March of Dimes to fight Polio. He called on every American to give, even if it was just a dime, to wipe out this terrible disease. Those dimes led to Dr. Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine. The vaccine was declared safe, effective and potent in 1955, ending the epidemic and protecting babies ever since.

On the other side of the coin is an image of a baby being cuddled in the hand of its parent, which is symbolic of the March of Dimes’ dedication to the health of babies everywhere

The silver dollar coin was authorized by an act of Congress thanks to the efforts of March of Dimes volunteers and members of Congress.

The March of Dimes is authorized to receive $10 from each silver dollar sold to help finance research, education and services aimed at improving the health of women, infants, and children. Only 500,000 silver dollars commemorating the 75th anniversary of the March of Dimes can be produced.

The coin is on sale now and will only be available in 2015. Introductory pricing is available until April 15 so don’t delay. We encourage you to share the news of this historic coin so you can own a piece of history and the March of Dimes can continue to help all babies.

For more info, visit here.

Image of Jonas Salk used with permission of the family of Jonas Salk.

IEP season is here

01
Apr
Posted by Barbara

kids at schoolIt’s April. Finally. This was one winter that I thought would never end! The beginning of spring usually signals the start of beautiful weather as well as IEP meetings, if your child is receiving special services. If you are new to this process, read this post to learn about IEPs.

The law says that your child’s IEP must be reviewed every year. Usually, schools start this process in the spring, so that they are all set to start services in the new school year. However, you should know that you can ask for a meeting to review an IEP at any time. You do not have to wait until the spring to review or change your child’s IEP. It MUST be done at least once per year, but it can be done more often, too.

Here are two great resources to help you through the process:
All About the IEP  and What You Need to Know About IEPs & IEP Meetings.

If you have questions, send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

You can also view other posts on IEPs in the Delays and Disabilities: How to get help for your child series, here.

Treating acne during pregnancy

30
Mar
Posted by Sara

skinOne of the most common questions we get at the Pregnancy and Newborn Health Education Center is about skin care during pregnancy. More specifically, about products that contain benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid. These over-the-counter cleansers and lotions are used to treat topical acne. Many of us use them every day, without even thinking about it. But during pregnancy, you may wonder if you should continue to use these products in your skin care routine.

According to MotherToBaby, a service of the non-profit Organization of Teratology Information Specialists, “Over-the-counter skin treatments have not been associated with an increased risk when used during pregnancy. Studies have shown that in most cases only 5% to 10% of the active ingredients are absorbed through the skin into your system. Since so little of the medication passes into the body, the amount that gets to the developing baby, if any, is unlikely to be high enough to cause birth defects.”

However, you should be careful and make sure you do not apply them to broken or irritated skin. That would allow more of the ingredients to be absorbed. Also, it is very important to make the distinction between these products and topical retinoids. Topical retinoids are used to treat acne and sun-damaged skin. Small amounts of these drugs may be absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream, so it is best to avoid them. You should never take oral retinoids during your pregnancy or if you are trying to conceive.

Keep in mind that there are many over-the-counter topical treatments available for acne. So you should make sure you talk to your health care provider if you have any questions and concerns. And always talk to your doctor before you take any oral medication during pregnancy, for acne or any other condition.