Cooking out this weekend?

24
May
Posted by Lauren

pregnant couple with grocery bagMemorial Day weekend is prime time for cookouts and family gatherings. And there’s one activity that can always bring people together – eating! Whether you’re hosting or preparing a side dish, be sure you take precautions in your preparations and in how your dish is served. These tips are especially important for pregnant women.

Before you begin your prep, here’s some tips to ensure your meal is a success:

  • Wash your hands. And then wash all of your fruits and vegetables and cut away any damaged sections.
  • Keep your raw meats and the tools you used to prepare them and keep them separate from the rest of your foods and supplies.
  • Make sure your meats such as hamburgers and grilled chicken are cooked thoroughly.
  • Be sure any salads and dishes with mayonnaise are kept cold and out of the sun.
  • Be sure to put leftovers away quickly – within 2 hours after eating.

Why the extra precaution?

Bacteria from foods can cause Salmonella and Listeriosis, both of which can be harmful to pregnant women.

Listeriosis is a kind of food poisoning caused by Listeria bacteria. This type of bacteria can come from hot dogs, unwashed fruits and vegetables and cold salads.

Salmonella is another kind of food poisoning caused by Salmonella bacteria. You can find this kind of bacteria in undercooked poultry, meat, fish or eggs.

If you’re pregnant, one of these types of food poisoning can cause serious problems for you and your baby, including premature birth, miscarriage and stillbirth. This is why it’s important to prepare your foods properly and serve foods that are safe. Your guests will be sure to thank you for a wonderful cookout and great company.

Have questions about a certain dish you are planning to make? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Neonatal abstinence syndrome

22
May
Posted by Sara

infant crying“The March of Dimes has made it a priority to help and support women and infants affected by opioid use and other substance use disorders,” says Stacey D. Stewart, president of the March of Dimes. “There are few things more tragic than an infant starting out life in drug withdrawal.  We owe it to these babies to do everything in our power to ensure they are treated appropriately and can recover fully from drug exposure.”

Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) happens when newborns go through drug withdrawal shortly after birth because they were exposed to drugs in the womb. In the United States, the number of babies born with NAS has been increasing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that the number of babies with NAS has tripled from 1999 to 2013.

What drugs can cause NAS?

One of the most common causes of NAS is maternal use or abuse of opioids during pregnancy. Opioids are painkillers your provider may recommend if you’ve been injured or had surgery. Some common opioids that may be prescribed include:

  • Codeine and hydrocodone (Vicodin®)
  • Morphine (Kadian®, Avinza®)
  • Oxycodone (OxyContin®, Percocet®)

Heroin is also an opioid. Using it during pregnancy can cause your baby to be born with NAS.

In addition to opioids, these drugs can lead to NAS too:

  • Certain antidepressants (prescription drugs used to treat depression)
  • Benzodiazepines (sleeping pills)

What are the signs and symptoms of NAS?

Babies may exhibit different signs of NAS. Most babies will show symptoms within 3 days (72 hours) of birth, but sometimes symptoms will appear soon after birth or a few weeks later. Signs and symptoms can include:

  • Body shakes (tremors), seizures (convulsions), overactive reflexes (twitching) and tight muscle tone
  • Fussiness, excessive crying or having a high-pitched cry
  • Poor feeding, poor sucking or slow weight gain
  • Breathing very fast
  • Fever, sweating or blotchy skin
  • Trouble sleeping and lots of yawning
  • Diarrhea or throwing up
  • Stuffy nose or sneezing

NAS can last from 1 week to 6 months after birth.

How is a baby with NAS treated?

Treatment for NAS may include:

  • Taking medicines to treat or manage severe withdrawal symptoms. Your baby’s provider may give her a medicine that’s similar to the drug you used during pregnancy. This can help relieve your baby’s withdrawal symptoms. Once these symptoms are under control, your baby gets smaller doses of the medicine over time so her body can adjust to being off the medicine. Medicines used to treat severe withdrawal symptoms include morphine, methadone and buprenorphine.
  • Getting IV fluids. Babies with NAS can get very dehydrated from having diarrhea or throwing up a lot. If a baby’s dehydrated, she doesn’t have enough water in her body. Getting fluids through an IV helps keep your baby from getting dehydrated.
  • Drinking higher-calorie baby formula. Some babies with NAS need extra calories to help them grow because they have trouble feeding or aren’t growing properly. slow growth.

Most babies with NAS who get treatment get better in 5 to 30 days.

Research

The March of Dimes, together with the CDC, has awarded grants to conduct one-year of surveillance on neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in three states with high rates of NAS:  Vermont, Illinois, and New Mexico. The project will enable each state to conduct enhanced identification of babies born with NAS and evaluate the health services needed by these babies through one year of age.

If you or someone you know is pregnant and struggling with drug use, please share these resources:

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Can stress, PTSD, or depression affect your pregnancy?

19
May
Posted by Sara

Contemplative womanWe receive a number of questions about the effects of stress and depression on pregnancy. Here is some information that can help you better understand these conditions, how they can affect your pregnancy, and when you should talk to your provider.

Stress

Feeling stress during pregnancy is very common. There are so many changes happening all at once—to your body, your emotions, and your family—it is hard not to feel overwhelmed. But too much stress can make you uncomfortable. Stress can make you have trouble sleeping or have headaches. Regular stress during pregnancy, such as work deadlines and sitting in traffic, probably don’t add to pregnancy problems.

However, more serious types of stress may increase your chances for premature birth. Serious types of stress include:

  • Negative life events. Such as divorce, serious illness or death in the family.
  • Catastrophic events. Earthquakes, hurricanes or terrorist attacks.
  • Long-lasting stress. This type of stress can be caused by having financial problems, being abused, having serious health problems or being depressed.
  • Racism. Some women may face stress from racism during their lives. This may help explain why African-American women in the United States are more likely to have premature and low-birthweight babies than women from other racial or ethnic groups.
  • Pregnancy-related stress. Some women may feel serious stress about pregnancy. They may be worried about miscarriage, the health of their baby or about how they’ll cope with labor and birth or becoming a parent. If you feel this way, talk to your health care provider.

We don’t completely understand the effects of stress on pregnancy. But stress-related hormones may play a role in causing some pregnancy complications.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

PTSD occurs in some people after they have experienced a shocking, scary, or dangerous event. People with PTSD may have:

  • Serious anxiety
  • Flashbacks of the event
  • Nightmares
  • Physical responses (like a racing heartbeat or sweating) when reminded of the event

As many as 8 in 100 women (8 percent) may have PTSD during pregnancy. Women who have PTSD may be more likely than women without it to have a premature or low-birthweight baby. A 2014 study looked at the effects of PTSD on pregnancy. Researchers reviewed over 16,000 births and found that having PTSD in the year before delivery increased a woman’s chance of giving birth early by 35%.

Depression

Depression is a medical condition in which strong feelings of sadness last for a long time and interfere with your daily life. People who have depression need treatment to help them get better. About 1 in 5 women has depression sometime in her life. And 1 in 7 women is treated for depression at some time between the year before pregnancy and the year after pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant and have depression that’s not treated, you’re more likely to have:

  • A premature baby.
  • A baby born at a low birthweight.
  • A baby who is more irritable, less active, less attentive and has fewer facial expressions than babies born to moms who don’t have depression during pregnancy

Being pregnant can make depression worse or make it come back if you’ve been treated and are feeling better. If you have depression that’s not treated, you may have trouble taking care of yourself during pregnancy. And if you have depression during pregnancy that’s not treated, you’re more likely to have postpartum depression (PPD) after pregnancy. PPD can make it hard for you to care for and bond with your baby. Treatment for depression during pregnancy can help prevent these problems.

If you are concerned that you may have one of these conditions, please talk to your health care provider. She can help you to get the appropriate treatment so that you and your baby can be as healthy as possible.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Repeat lead tests are advised for certain children, pregnant women and breastfeeding moms

17
May
Posted by Barbara

blood-testsToday, the FDA and CDC issued a notice that some lead tests done by Magellan Diagnostics may be incorrect.

The FDA says “certain lead tests manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics may provide inaccurate results for some children and adults in the United States.”

If you have a child age 6 years old or younger, are pregnant or breastfeeding, speak with your healthcare provider or local health department to determine if retesting is needed.

The dangers of lead

Lead is a metal that comes from the ground, but it can be in air, water and food. You can’t see, smell or taste it. High levels of lead in your body can cause serious health problems for you and your family.

Children younger than 6 years of age can be severely affected by lead. It can cause developmental problems, hearing loss, vomiting, irritability, belly pain and weight loss. Very high levels of lead may even cause death.

Lead poisoning (high levels of lead in your body) can cause serious problems during pregnancy, such as premature birth, miscarriage, and high blood pressure. It can also cause fertility problems, mood disorders, headaches, muscle or joint pain, trouble concentrating, belly pain, anemia and fatigue in adults.

Where is lead?

Most lead comes from paint in older homes. When old paint cracks or peels, it makes dust that has lead in it. The dust may be too small to see. You can breathe in the dust and not know it.

Lead may be found in drinking water, at construction sites, in arts and crafts materials used to make stained glass, lead crystal glassware, and some soil.

For more information on lead poisoning, see our web article and the CDC’s information.

Bottom line

If you have a child age 6 or younger, or you are pregnant or breastfeeding, contact your healthcare provider to determine if a lead test should be repeated.

Have questions? Contact our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

You can find more news on our News Moms Need blog.

 

Need a few ways to get to a healthier you? We’ve got them!

15
May
Posted by Lauren

#MCHchat 5.16.17This week is National Women’s Health Week.

Join our Twitter chat tomorrow from 12 – 1pm EST, to learn about ways to feel good and be your best self.

Use #MCHChat to join the conversation!

In the meantime, here are some ways to jump start getting to a healthier you.

The good thing about summer coming is the warm weather. There is nothing I love more than going out for a walk on my lunch break. I get my blood moving and it’s a chance to listen to an audio book, catch up with a friend or just take in the scenery. When I get back to my desk I feel refreshed and ready to tackle the next project.

Living a healthy lifestyle isn’t just about getting out and exercising though, it’s about your whole self. This includes your body and your mind. Things like getting enough sleep at night and managing your stress levels are related to your health. Even wearing your seatbelt and avoiding texting while driving will help you take steps to a healthier lifestyle.

What are a few ways you can make a big difference in your life?

  • Schedule a checkup with your health care provider for a well-woman visit. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant soon, this is a perfect time to schedule a preconception visit. You’ll want to be as healthy as possible before getting pregnant.
  • Keep tabs on how your mind and emotions are doing – are you stressed? sad? anxious? Your provider can help you figure out ways to manage all that life throws your way.
  • Make a grocery list before you go to the store – this will help you plan meals and avoid making unhealthy impulse purchases.
  • Take advantage of the nice weather! Go for a walk or bike ride.
  • Are you a smoker? You can get help to quit – ask your provider for resources or call 1-800-Quit-Now.

Small steps can lead to big changes

If making healthy changes feels overwhelming, take it one item at a time. This week, call your provider and make your well-woman appointment. Next week try to add on something else, like a 10 minute walk during lunchtime.

Small changes can lead to big leaps in getting to a healthier you. Take it day by day, and week by week.

 

Sharing Mommy Moments for Mother’s Day

12
May
Posted by Barbara

Family walking outdoorsMother’s Day is coming up this Sunday. Let’s take some time to share special moments and memories.

What are some meaningful memories you have of your mother?

Are you a mom? What are some of the most memorable moments with your child that you cherish?

Do you have any humorous stories that would be fun to share?

Here are a couple from me to start us off:

“Dinner’s ready! Wash your hands!” my mother calls. We all show up at the table and it’s obvious that my brother’s hands are not clean. “But I washed them!” he protested. “So why are they still dirty ?” my mother asks. He looks at his hands to see the dirt on the top of his hands (not on his palms) and says “Oh – I had to wash the top, too??”

When we got a new TV and I was having trouble figuring out how the remote control worked, my son picked up the remote and took over effortlessly. My daughter then turned to me and said “Mommy – you need to practice more!”

Here are some from my colleagues:

“Walk…don’t run” my mother said. I wish I had listened. I was so excited that “our” lake was frozen enough that I could ice-skate, so I started to run up the outside stairs from the lake to the house, and of course, slipped on the icy step and fractured my wrist.  No skating that season for me…

One great memory I have from growing up with my mom is her surprise lunches. Every day at school I would sit down and open my lunch box to see what she had put together for me. She always cut my peanut butter and jelly sandwiches into fun shapes and designs and often included a little love note. It was as if I was getting a hug from her all the way at school and it always put a big smile on my face.

What’s your mommy moment? Please share.

And to all moms and moms-to-be, have a wonderful Mother’s Day!

 

Thank you to all nurses!

10
May
Posted by Lauren

Nurse holding babyIf your baby was in the NICU, you most likely spent a great deal of time with her team of nurses. Likewise, if you had a difficult pregnancy, a nurse was probably by your side assisting you the whole way.

Nurses are critical in the care of mothers and babies. Many families who have had a baby born prematurely or with a health condition have told us just how fantastic the nursing staff was at their hospital. Nurses are hardworking, compassionate, highly educated professionals who work around the clock to ensure that you and your baby get the care you need.

In honor of National Nurse’s Week we want to thank all of the nurses that have impacted March of Dimes’ families. In particular, we wish to congratulate the four nurses who won the March of Dimes Graduate Nursing Scholarship Awards.

To recognize and promote excellence in nursing care of mothers and babies, the March of Dimes offers several $5,000 scholarships annually to registered nurses enrolled in graduate programs of maternal-child nursing. The March of Dimes Dr. Margaret C. Freda Graduate Nursing Scholarship Award was established in 2016 to honor long-time March of Dimes National Nurse Advisory Council Chair, volunteer, and friend, Dr. Margaret Comerford Freda. This award is given each year to the highest scoring graduate nursing scholarship applicant. Congratulations to our winners!

Did you have an amazing nurse that took care of you or your baby? How did he or she impact your NICU stay?

Share your story and help us thank all nurses for their unending dedication and incredibly hard work.

 

Prevent syphilis in your baby

08
May
Posted by Barbara

doctorCongenital syphilis (present at birth) can cause serious lifelong health conditions, or even death, for a baby. Unfortunately, the number of congenital syphilis cases in the United States increased 46 percent between 2012 and 2015.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD), also known as a sexually transmitted infection (STI). You can get it by having unprotected sex with someone who is infected with syphilis. You can also get it by having direct contact with an infected person’s syphilis sore which may be on a person’s lips, in their mouth or on their genitals.

If a woman has syphilis and gets pregnant, she needs to be treated for syphilis. If she doesn’t receive treatment, syphilis can pass to her baby.

The good news is that congenital syphilis is preventable:

  1. Protect yourself first. Either don’t have sex or have safe sex by using a condom or other barrier method.
  2. Go to all your prenatal care checkups; your provider will test you for syphilis.
  3. If you have syphilis, your provider will begin treatment. The sooner you receive treatment, the less likely you and your baby may have complications from the infection.
  4. Ask your partner to be tested (and treated) for syphilis, so that you don’t get infected or re-infected.

If you’re not sure whether you have syphilis, or think you may have been exposed to it, contact your healthcare provider.

See our article for more details about protecting yourself and your baby from syphilis. Our article includes diagnosis and treatment information, too.

If you have questions, text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

What is tetralogy of Fallot?

05
May
Posted by Sara

You have probably heard about Jimmy Kimmel’s baby, Billy, being born with a critical congenital heart defect called tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Fortunately, Billy received lifesaving heart surgery and is home from the hospital, reportedly doing well.

Congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects. Nearly 1 in 100 babies (about 1 percent or 40,000 babies) is born with a heart defect in the United States each year. And critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a group of the seven most severe congenital heart defects. About 4,800 babies each year are born with a CCHD. Babies with CCHD need treatment within the first few hours, days or months of life. Without treatment, CCHD can be deadly.

TOF is a rare congenital heart defect that affects about 1,660 babies each year in the United States. Babies born with this condition actually have four different problems with their heart. According to the CDC, they are:

  1. A hole in the wall between the two lower chambers―or ventricles―of the heart. This condition also is called a ventricular septal defect.
  2. A narrowing of the pulmonary valve and main pulmonary artery. This condition also is called pulmonary stenosis.
  3. The aortic valves, which opens to the aorta, is enlarged and seems to open from both ventricles, rather than from the left ventricle only, as in a normal heart. In this defect, the aortic valve sits directly on top of the ventricular septal defect.
  4. The muscular wall of the lower right chamber of the heart (right ventricle) is thicker than normal. This also is called ventricular hypertrophy.

Signs and Symptoms

After birth, signs and symptoms of heart defects can include:

  • Fast breathing
  • Gray or blue skin coloring (also called cyanosis)
  • Fatigue (feeling tired all of the time)
  • Slow weight gain
  • Swollen belly, legs or puffiness around the eyes
  • Trouble breathing while feeding
  • Sweating, especially while feeding
  • Abnormal heart murmur (unusual sounds heard during a heartbeat)

Diagnosis

TOF can be diagnosed during pregnancy or after birth. During a prenatal ultrasound a doctor may be able to determine that there is a problem with the baby’s heart. A fetal echocardiogram (an ultrasound of just the heart) would then be ordered for further testing. An echocardiogram is an ultrasound of the baby’s heart that can show problems with the structure of the heart and how the heart is working.

However, TOF is usually diagnosed after the baby is born. In most cases, health care providers detect a heart murmur (often a “whooshing” sound heard between heartbeats) or cyanosis (baby’s skin turns blue).

To confirm the presence of a CCHD, a health care provider will order an echocardiogram.

TOF and CCHD can also be detected with newborn screening. Newborn screening checks for serious but rare conditions at birth. It includes blood, hearing and heart screening. All states require newborn screening, but they don’t all require screening for CCHD. Babies are screened for CCHD with a test called pulse oximetry (also called pulse ox). This test checks the amount of oxygen in your baby’s blood using a sensor attached to his finger or foot.

Treatment

Babies born with TOF need to have surgery soon after they are born to widen the pulmonary valve. This allows the blood to reach the lungs and become oxygenated. They will also correct the hole between the lower chambers of the heart. And additional surgeries to replace valves may also be required.

Most babies born with TOF go on to be active and healthy, but they will need to be followed by a cardiologist throughout their lives. We’re glad Jimmy Kimmel’s baby received prompt care and continues to do well.

Research

Heart defects develop in the early weeks of pregnancy when the heart is forming, often before you know you’re pregnant and most of the time, there is no known cause of a congenital heart defect. That is why many March of Dimes grantees are pursuing a variety of approaches aimed at preventing heart defects and improving their treatment.

Headache? Nausea? Could be more serious then you thought

03
May
Posted by Lauren

2014d037_1495We receive many questions from expectant moms who are experiencing symptoms such as headaches or swelling. They worry it might be something serious, like preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia is a kind of high blood pressure some women get after the 20th week of pregnancy or after giving birth.  Along with high blood pressure, a pregnant woman can have signs that some of her organs, like her kidneys and liver, may not be working properly.

Signs and symptoms of preeclampsia include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Protein in the urine
  • Severe headaches
  • Changes in vision, like blurriness, flashing lights, seeing spots or being sensitive to light
  • Pain in the upper right belly area or pain in the shoulder
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Sudden weight gain (2 to 5 pounds in a week)
  • Swelling in the legs, hands and face
  • Trouble breathing

Without treatment, preeclampsia can cause serious health problems for both you and your baby. The condition can cause kidney, liver and brain damage for you and premature birth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) or low birthweight for your baby.

Many of the signs and symptoms of preeclampsia are just normal discomforts of pregnancy.

So how do you know if your symptoms are a sign of something more serious?

Your health care provider can diagnose preeclampsia by measuring your blood pressure and checking your urine for protein – both of these are routinely checked at every prenatal care visit.

If you are diagnosed with preeclampsia, your provider can help you manage most health complications through regular prenatal care. This is why it’s important to go to every appointment, even if you are feeling fine.

So, to know if your severe headache or sudden swelling is cause for concern, reach out to your health care provider. He can determine if your symptoms are normal pregnancy discomforts or something more serious like preeclampsia.

For more details about this serious condition, visit our website.