Posts Tagged ‘adjusted age’

Holidays & your child with special needs- tips for the NICU, visiting Santa, dinners & traveling

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

Parents in NICUFrom spending holidays in the NICU, finding developmentally appropriate toys, eating at Grandma’s house (without a meltdown!), to visiting Santa in a loud, bright mall, the holidays can be oh so hard for a child with special needs. Here is a walk down blog post memory lane to help you get through the next few weeks and even have some fun.

We wish you a stress-free, calm, smooth holiday season. If you have any tips that have worked for you, please share them! You can find more posts on parenting a child with special needs, here.

Questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Toys glorious toys!

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

playing with toysAt one time, parents did not have many options to find appropriate toys for a child with a disability or developmental challenge. Nowadays, it is possible to find just the right kind of toy for your child’s individual needs. She can play at her own level and be a very happy camper.

What child does not love toys? It seems to me that the word “toy” is synonymous with “child.” It is hard to separate the two. At this time of year, there is a seemingly endless variety of toys available. Yet, for parents of a child with special needs, it can seem hard to find toys that are appropriate for your child’s condition.

Fortunately, a simple internet search for “toys for kids with special needs” will yield multiple sites that feature toys for children with physical or cognitive challenges, speech and developmental delays, hearing or vision impairments, sensory disorders, issues related to autism and learning disabilities. You can find everything from sensory swings to board games with larger print. You will not be at a loss to find the right toy for your little one.

When searching for toys by age group, remember to keep your child’s adjusted age in mind if he was born prematurely. And, see this post for other tips on shopping for toys kids with special needs.

This year, let your fingers do the searching and find the perfect gift for your child with special needs. The hours of fun your child gets from a toy that is right for him will give you hours of joy!

 

Note: This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – How to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need, select “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date. You can also view a Table of Contents of prior posts.

Feel free to ask questions. Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Preemies- adjusted age and delays

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

toddler with pig tailsAll babies develop at their own rate. But there is a special way to determine if premature babies are developing as they should.

Babies who are born prematurely have two ages: chronological and adjusted.  Chronological age is the age of your baby from the day of his birth—the number of days, weeks or years old that your baby has been in the outside world.  Adjusted age is the developmental age of your baby based on his due date (when he would have been born).

To calculate adjusted age, take your premature baby’s chronological age and subtract the number of weeks your baby was premature.  For example, a baby who has a chronological age of 10 weeks but was born 4 weeks early has an adjusted age of 6 weeks. (10 – 4 = 6)

Why is this important?

Since so much of a baby’s growth and development takes place during pregnancy, babies who are born prematurely miss out on valuable developmental time. As a result, they may lag behind other babies who share their actual birthday. Health care providers may use your baby’s adjusted age when they evaluate your baby’s growth and development.

An infant who is 12 months old but was born 2 months early (and consequently has an adjusted age of 10 months) should not be compared to other 12 month old babies. Instead, he should be compared to other 10 month old babies. Then, his growth and development will seem more in line with typical developmental milestones.

Measuring delays

As your child grows, it may become awkward to constantly have two ages. Hopefully, as time passes, he will begin catching up to his chronologically same-aged peers. Some preemies catch up completely; others have delays or developmental issues that last for years. No two children are exactly alike. But, if you understand that your preemie should be evaluated based on his adjusted age (especially in the early months/years of his life), then it becomes easier to determine if he is delayed and if he is making timely progress.

You can learn more about developmental milestones in preemies by watching our video.

Get help early

If your child is not meeting his developmental milestones or is at risk of having a delay, specialists may be needed to help optimize your baby’s progress. Just as a person may need physical therapy to improve movement after an injury, a toddler who was born prematurely may need physical therapy to help him learn to move or walk. Many preemies have vision or hearing problems which may cause speech difficulties; the help of a speech therapist can make all the difference in helping him learn to talk. Likewise, through the help of an occupational therapist your child may overcome many challenges associated with the different aspects of daily life – from feeding and sitting in a chair to socializing.

Fortunately, in the United States, the Early Intervention program is there to help babies and toddlers who are experiencing developmental delays. Read this blog series to learn how to access this system and help your child get off on the right foot. If you suspect that your child is struggling or is delayed, it is best to get help as soon as possible – don’t delay with delays.

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need and click on “Help for your child” in the Categories menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date (just keep scrolling down). We welcome your comments and input. If you have questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Adjusting age for preemies

Tuesday, February 15th, 2011

dad-with-preemieBabies who are born prematurely often have two ages:  Chronological age is the age of the baby from the day of birth—the number of days, weeks or years old the baby actually has been in the outside world.  Adjusted age is the developmental age of the baby based on his due date.

To calculate adjusted age, you take your premature baby’s chronological age (for example, 20 weeks) and subtract the number of weeks premature the baby was (born 6 weeks early).  In this example, the baby’s adjusted age would be 14 weeks.  Health care providers may use the adjusted age when they evaluate the baby’s growth and development.

Barring serious physical or neurological injury, most premature babies “catch up” to their peers, developmentally, in two to three years. After that, any differences in size or development are most likely due to individual differences, rather than to premature birth. Some very small babies take longer to catch up. You can stop adjusting your baby’s age when it feels most comfortable to you.