Posts Tagged ‘blood pressure’

Headache? Nausea? Could be more serious then you thought

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017

2014d037_1495We receive many questions from expectant moms who are experiencing symptoms such as headaches or swelling. They worry it might be something serious, like preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia is a kind of high blood pressure some women get after the 20th week of pregnancy or after giving birth.  Along with high blood pressure, a pregnant woman can have signs that some of her organs, like her kidneys and liver, may not be working properly.

Signs and symptoms of preeclampsia include:

  • High blood pressure
  • Protein in the urine
  • Severe headaches
  • Changes in vision, like blurriness, flashing lights, seeing spots or being sensitive to light
  • Pain in the upper right belly area or pain in the shoulder
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Sudden weight gain (2 to 5 pounds in a week)
  • Swelling in the legs, hands and face
  • Trouble breathing

Without treatment, preeclampsia can cause serious health problems for both you and your baby. The condition can cause kidney, liver and brain damage for you and premature birth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) or low birthweight for your baby.

Many of the signs and symptoms of preeclampsia are just normal discomforts of pregnancy.

So how do you know if your symptoms are a sign of something more serious?

Your health care provider can diagnose preeclampsia by measuring your blood pressure and checking your urine for protein – both of these are routinely checked at every prenatal care visit.

If you are diagnosed with preeclampsia, your provider can help you manage most health complications through regular prenatal care. This is why it’s important to go to every appointment, even if you are feeling fine.

So, to know if your severe headache or sudden swelling is cause for concern, reach out to your health care provider. He can determine if your symptoms are normal pregnancy discomforts or something more serious like preeclampsia.

For more details about this serious condition, visit our website.

 

How my baby and I survived preeclampsia

Friday, May 13th, 2016

For Preeclampsia Awareness Month, we are grateful to one mom for sharing her story with us.

In my fight against preeclampsia, I advocated for myself and my baby and ended up saving both of our lives.

It started at about 22 weeks of pregnancy, when I had trouble with my eyes. I started to step down onto an escalator and realized I couldn’t see where one step stopped and the next started. My doctor reassured me that eye changes were normal.

By 24 weeks, more symptoms popped up. I was very itchy, my ankles were swollen and I had trouble breathing when reclining. The nurse told me that was normal.

By 25 weeks, the symptoms increased. I never had the urge to urinate and when I did, it was orangish brown. My ankles were so swollen that I had to lift up the skin to slide on a pair of shoes that were two sizes too big.

I called the doctor’s office and was told that my appointment was in 9 days and they would see me then. I decided to check my blood pressure on my own so I drove to a local supermarket and checked my blood pressure at the pharmacy. It was 180/120. I was shocked! I took it again and got the same results.

Feeling concerned, I drove to the doctor’s office. Within an hour, I was diagnosed with severe preeclampsia (my protein came back at +5) and I was on my way to the hospital for bedrest. I had a seizure within the hour of being admitted in the hospital when my blood pressure reached 240/180.

Two days later, after my 24 hour urine test came back at +19 and I was showing signs of HELLP Syndrome, I was put on mag sulfate and transferred to a new hospital with a high risk OB and an OB-ICU. More importantly, it was located next door to a hospital with a Level 4 NICU.

Preemie baby due to preeclampsiaUnfortunately, my condition worsened that night and by the next evening I was in liver and kidney failure. An emergency C-section was ordered and my daughter was born a few hours later at just 25 weeks and 5 days. She weighed 1lb, 10 oz and was 13” long.

She went on to spend 90 days in the NICU. She had a PDA ligation, a feeding tube and was vented for a month. She came home on oxygen and with the feeding tube but both were removed within a month of coming home. She is now 14 years old, an 8th grade honors student and a competitive gymnast. She is also an only child.

As for me, I spent another 3 weeks on blood pressure medicine. Ten years later, I was diagnosed with diabetes and required 3 stents in my heart. It was also found that my heart had sustained damage during my pregnancy and was severely underperforming. I went through cardiac rehab and will have to be followed by a cardiologist for the rest of my life. Research shows that women who develop preeclampsia have a much greater risk of heart disease and stroke.

If I have one message to share with all pregnant women, it would be to trust your instincts. If you don’t feel right – go get checked. In my case, it saved both my life and my child’s.

Are you a preeclampsia survivor? We hope you’ll share your story below, to help other moms and babies.

Learn more about the life-long effects of preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome.

Keeping your heart healthy

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

heart-healthDid you know that about 1 out of every 125 infants is born with a congenital heart defect (CHD) each year in the U.S.? CHDs are among the most common birth defects and are the leading cause of birth defect-related infant deaths.

We worry a lot about our babies and their hearts, but do you think enough about your own heart?  Since February is American Heart Month, and pregnancy puts a fair amount of physical stress on a woman, I thought it a good time to mention taking care of your own ticker before you conceive.  Not thinking about pregnancy? You still need to read this. No matter what our age, here are some things each of us can do to help improve our heart health.

Stop smoking – Even if you do smoke, you’ve got to know it’s not good for you.  But did you know smoking may make it harder for you to get pregnant? And if you smoke while you’re pregnant, your baby is at greater risk for being born prematurely or too small?

Have your doc check your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.  If they test high, take steps to bring them down.  Most health care providers want your BP to be at or below 120/80 and total cholesterol to be below 200.

If you have a family history of diabetes, get your blood sugar checked.  Make sure you get into a program to help keep it in control before and during pregnancy.

Eat right – Eat foods from each of the five food groups: fruits, vegetables, proteins (like chicken, fish and dried beans), grains, and milk products. Easy does it on salt and avoid foods high in fat and sugar.

Get to a good weight – If you’re not at your ideal weight (too many holiday treats?) knock off a few pounds, or gain ‘em if you need ‘em.  Exercise regularly and get fit. Exercising for 30 minutes on all or most days of the week is a good way to help maintain or lose weight, build fitness and reduce stress.

Reduce your daily stress – Pregnancy is a stressful time for many women. You may be feeling happy, sad and scared—all at the same time. It’s okay to feel like that, but doing what you can to reduce stress before pregnancy can help you better manage extra stress associated with pregnancy.  And if you’re not considering pregnancy, reducing stress can improve your quality of life in general.  Sounds good to me!