Posts Tagged ‘CDC’

Repeat lead tests are advised for certain children, pregnant women and breastfeeding moms

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

blood-testsToday, the FDA and CDC issued a notice that some lead tests done by Magellan Diagnostics may be incorrect.

The FDA says “certain lead tests manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics may provide inaccurate results for some children and adults in the United States.”

If you have a child age 6 years old or younger, are pregnant or breastfeeding, speak with your healthcare provider or local health department to determine if retesting is needed.

The dangers of lead

Lead is a metal that comes from the ground, but it can be in air, water and food. You can’t see, smell or taste it. High levels of lead in your body can cause serious health problems for you and your family.

Children younger than 6 years of age can be severely affected by lead. It can cause developmental problems, hearing loss, vomiting, irritability, belly pain and weight loss. Very high levels of lead may even cause death.

Lead poisoning (high levels of lead in your body) can cause serious problems during pregnancy, such as premature birth, miscarriage, and high blood pressure. It can also cause fertility problems, mood disorders, headaches, muscle or joint pain, trouble concentrating, belly pain, anemia and fatigue in adults.

Where is lead?

Most lead comes from paint in older homes. When old paint cracks or peels, it makes dust that has lead in it. The dust may be too small to see. You can breathe in the dust and not know it.

Lead may be found in drinking water, at construction sites, in arts and crafts materials used to make stained glass, lead crystal glassware, and some soil.

For more information on lead poisoning, see our web article and the CDC’s information.

Bottom line

If you have a child age 6 or younger, or you are pregnant or breastfeeding, contact your healthcare provider to determine if a lead test should be repeated.

Have questions? Contact our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

You can find more news on our News Moms Need blog.

 

Zika virus case believed to be found in Texas

Tuesday, November 29th, 2016

Aedes aegypti mosquitoHealth officials in South Texas believe they have identified their first locally transmitted case of Zika virus in a woman living in Brownsville.

A locally transmitted case means that the person who got the Zika virus did not get it by traveling to a place where it is commonly found nor did the person have sex with someone who has the virus. She also did not get it through a blood transfusion or in a lab setting. In other words, it was most likely spread by an infected mosquito.

Texas health officials have set up surveillance sites in the Brownsville area where the infected woman lives, to test mosquitoes for possible infection. They are also trying to find out if anyone else in the area has been infected with the virus.

CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. said “Even though it is late in the mosquito season, mosquitoes can spread Zika in some areas of the country. Texas is doing the right thing by increasing local surveillance and trapping and testing mosquitoes in the Brownsville area.”

The CDC’s press release states: “As of Nov 23, 2016, 4,444 cases of Zika have been reported to CDC in the continental United States and Hawaii; 182 of these were the result of local spread by mosquitoes. These cases include 36 believed to be the result of sexual transmission and one that was the result of a laboratory exposure. This number does not include the current case under investigation in Texas.”

Now that the cold weather has arrived, you may think that the Zika virus is a thing of the past. But, this announcement of a likely locally transmitted case of Zika should be a reminder that Zika is still here, and it is still a threat.

If a woman gets infected with Zika during pregnancy, she can pass it to her baby. It can cause a birth defect called microcephaly, congenital Zika syndrome, and other developmental problems.

Read why Zika is harmful to pregnant women and babies, and what you need to know to keep you and your family safe.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

CDC’s 8 fast facts about Zika if you’re pregnant or trying to conceive

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

microcephalyIf you get infected with Zika during pregnancy, you can pass it to your baby. Zika infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects such as microcephaly, and other brain problems. Here’s what the CDC wants you to know:

1. All pregnant women in the United States should be assessed for possible Zika virus exposure and signs or symptoms of Zika during each prenatal care visit.

2. The most common symptoms of Zika virus are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (also known as pink eye). Other symptoms could include muscle pain and headache.

3. Zika virus is most commonly spread through mosquito bites.

4. Zika virus may be passed through sex by a person who carries the virus, even if he or she never develops symptoms.

5. For women and men who have been diagnosed with Zika, have symptoms, or have had possible exposure to the Zika virus, CDC recommends that women wait at least 8 weeks before trying to get pregnant, and that men wait at least 6 months before trying to get their partner pregnant.

6. In addition to microcephaly, doctors have found other problems among babies infected with Zika virus before birth, such as missing or poorly developed brain structures, defects of the eye, hearing problems, and impaired growth.

7. Zika also may be linked to miscarriage and stillbirth.

8. Zika virus has been found in breast milk, but there are no reports of babies getting infected with Zika from breastfeeding.

Researchers are collecting data to better understand the extent of the Zika virus’ impact on mothers and their babies.

Share these facts with friends, family, and coworkers. For more information about Zika, please visit cdc.gov/PreventZika or our web article. 

Thanks to the CDC for sharing these facts, so you can protect yourself and your family from Zika.

Photo courtesy of CDC.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org. 

March of Dimes honors CDC Director for work protecting moms and babies from Zika

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Dr. Frieden, Dir. CDCToday, Dr. Frieden received the March of Dimes President’s Leadership Award for serving as a champion in the fight against Zika. This award is given to acknowledge very high levels of achievement in preventing birth defects, premature birth, and infant mortality. Dr. Frieden is receiving it for his outstanding leadership in combatting Zika and raising public awareness of its threat to newborn health.

The March of Dimes and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have been working together for many years to protect moms, babies and families from diseases and to promote good health. Since the Zika outbreak, March of Dimes and CDC have joined forces to spread the word about the devastating impact of this virus on pregnant women and babies.

Thomas Frieden, MD, MPH, Director of the CDC, is at the helm focusing national and global attention on this virus. Zika can cause microcephaly and other brain problems, and is linked to miscarriage and stillbirth.

Dr. Howse, President of March of Dimes says “We’re giving Dr. Frieden this award to show our gratitude for his dedication to preventing Zika virus infection during this epidemic. His decisive actions and strong voice for protecting women and families from serious birth defects caused by Zika are at the heart of our mission.”

Thank you Dr. Frieden. Together we will continue educating the public on how they can protect themselves from Zika.

To learn more about the Zika virus – where it is in the world, its impact on pregnant women and babies, and what you can do to stay safe – visit marchofdimes.org/zika.

If you have questions, send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We’re here to help.

 

Vaccinating on time is important for disease protection

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Special thanks to the CDC for sharing this post with us.

baby vaccinationParents agree that feeding and sleep schedules are important to help keep their children healthy. The same goes for childhood immunizations. Vaccinating children on time is the best way to protect them from 14 serious and potentially deadly diseases before their second birthday.

“The recommended immunization schedule is designed to offer protection early in life,” said Dr. Candice Robinson, a pediatrician at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “when babies are vulnerable and before it’s likely they will be exposed to diseases.”

Public health and medical experts base their vaccine recommendations on many factors. They study information about diseases and vaccines very carefully to decide which vaccines kids should get and when they should get them for best protection.

Although the number of vaccines a child needs in the first two years of life may seem like a lot, doctors know a great deal about the human immune system, and they know that a healthy baby’s immune system can handle getting all vaccines when they are recommended.

Dr. Robinson cautions against parents delaying vaccination. “There is no known benefit to delaying vaccination. In fact, it puts babies at risk of getting sick because they are left vulnerable to catch serious diseases during the time they are not protected by vaccines.”

When parents choose not to vaccinate or to follow a delayed schedule, children are left unprotected against diseases that still circulate in this country, like measles and whooping cough.

In 2014, 667 people in the United States were reported as having measles; this is highest number of measles cases since the disease was eliminated from the United States in 2000. Staying on track with the immunization schedule ensures that children have the best protection against diseases like this by age 2.

Parents who are concerned about the number of shots given at one time can reduce the number given at a visit by using the flexibility built into the recommended immunization schedule. For example, the third dose of hepatitis B vaccine can be given at 6 through 18 months of age. Parents can work with their child’s healthcare professional to have their child get this dose at any time during that age range.

“I make sure my kids are vaccinated on time,” said Dr. Amanda Cohn, a pediatrician at CDC. “Getting children all the vaccines they need by age 2 is one of the best things parents can do to help keep their children safe and healthy.”

If you have questions about the childhood immunization schedule, talk with your child’s health care provider.

You can also visit our website for more information.

Have questions? Email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Antidepressant use and what it means for pregnant women

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Doctor with womanMore than 15% of reproductive-aged women have filled a prescription for an antidepressant medication during the years 2008-2013 according to a new analysis released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

An antidepressant is a medication used to treat depression. Some commonly used antidepressants are sertraline (Zoloft), bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban), and citalopram (Celexa).

Why is this important?

There is conflicting evidence about the potential link between some antidepressants and certain birth defects.  Antidepressant medication use during pregnancy has been increasing in the U.S. Given that 50% of all pregnancies are unplanned, antidepressant use may  occur during the first weeks of pregnancy, a critical time for fetal development.

Further research on antidepressant safety during pregnancy is needed so that health care providers can advise women about the potential risks and benefits of using certain antidepressants before, during and between pregnancies.

What is being done?

The CDC’s initiative, Treating for Two: Safer Medication Use in Pregnancy, provides women and their health care providers with reliable and accessible information on common medication used during pregnancy. The CDC aims to expand and accelerate research on prescription antidepressant use during pregnancy so that women have up-to-date information and providers can make informed treatment decisions and prescribe the safest medications.

What can you do?

If you are thinking about pregnancy or are  pregnant, speak with your prenatal care provider about any medications you are taking.

If you’re taking an antidepressant and find out you’re pregnant, don’t stop taking the medicine without talking to your provider first. Not taking your medicine may be harmful to your baby, and it may make your depression come back.

Bottom line

Talk with all of your providers about the benefits and risks of taking an antidepressant during pregnancy and decide together on your treatment plan.

Children with Congenital Heart Defects and Their Use of Special Educational Services

Wednesday, August 19th, 2015

A guest post by Coleen Boyle, PhD, MSHyg
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Teacher and studentsSome new research gives us encouraging information showing that children living with birth defects are getting the services they need. Specifically, several of my colleagues and I found that children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) received special education services more often than children without birth defects.

This is important news, because earlier studies have shown us that children with some types of CHDs have a greater chance of having problems with brain development and function as compared to children without birth defects. Knowing that children with CHDs may benefit from—and are receiving—special education services is reassuring. Special education services are those specifically designed to meet the unique needs of a child with a disability.

So what do these findings mean? They demonstrate the importance of developmental screening—short tests usually conducted by a child’s doctor to determine if their basic learning skills are where they should be—for all children with CHDs to ensure they receive the services they need. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all children receive these screenings at 9, 18 and 24 or 30 months of age during well visits with the doctor. Screenings may include observing, talking with, or playing with the child to see how he or she plays, speaks, behaves, and moves.

CHDs are heart problems that occur before birth and are the most common type of birth defect in the United States. About 1% or nearly 40,000 births each year are affected by CHDs. Of these, about 1 in 4 is considered a critical CHD, in which surgery or other procedures are needed within the baby’s first year.

Some of the specific findings from the study show that
• Children with CHDs and no other birth defect were 50% more likely to receive special education services than those children without birth defects.
• This increased use of special education services occurred in children with critical CHDs and in children with noncritical CHD.

For this study, we looked at information about children born with a CHD from 1982 to 2004 in metropolitan Atlanta; we also examined a similar sample of newborns without a birth defect. After linking information about these children to special education services they later received (from 1992 to 2012), we determined that children with CHDs more often received those services than children without birth defects.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and our partners not only conduct research such as this to identify the scope of the issue and how it is being addressed, we also
• Fund programs and conduct research to help us determine where and when birth defects occur and whom they affect;
• Track CHDs among teens and adults to learn more about their health issues and needs; and
• Collaborate with partners such as the March of Dimes to provide information to families, experts, and organizations to address CHDs.

We at CDC and in particular the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) along with our partners, including March of Dimes, strive to help ensure individuals born with these conditions get the care they need throughout their lives.

To learn more read the Key Findings document and the research article abstract.

dr-coleen-boyleThe March of Dimes wishes to thank Dr. Coleen Boyle for this guest post. Dr. Boyle is the Director of NCBDDD and has authored or co-authored more than 100 peer-reviewed and other scientific publications.

Join our Twitter Chat on smoking and women’s reproductive health

Monday, July 14th, 2014

chatAre you pregnant? Hoping to be pregnant? Do you smoke? Are you worried about the possible effects on your baby?

Join us on Wednesday, July 16th from 2-3pm ET, for a Twitter chat on smoking and women’s reproductive health.

We are joining the CDC, the Office of the Surgeon General and other guests to discuss the newest information on this topic. Learn how you can protect yourself and your  baby from the harmful effects of smoking. We will discuss the findings of the recent Surgeon General’s report on smoking, as well as the services and resources available in your community to help you or loved ones quit smoking.

We’d love for you to share your tips and experiences with us. Jump in the conversation at any time to ask questions or tell us your story.

Just follow #SGR50chat. We hope to see you then!

Gulf oil spill information for parents

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

Last month we posted a link to a CDC web page for pregnant women living in the Gulf region who are concerned about contaminants.  If you haven’t seen it yet, check it out.  Now the CDC has created a web page with information about the Gulf oil spill for parents – an important site to visit.

 If you live in the region or you’re going there on vacation, there may be plenty of questions you want answers to.  Will the air make my child sick? Is it safe for him to swim in the water or play on the beach? Is the oil itself harmful or toxic? Are oil dispersants harmful to children?  Aside from finding good information now, you can ask to receive email when updates are posted.

The Environment Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are working together to continue monitoring the levels of oil and oil dispersants in the environment. If they begin to find levels that are likely to be harmful, they will tell the public. For up-to-date information on monitoring data along the Gulf Coast, please visit the EPA’s website.

Gulf oil spill and pregnant women

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010

Through all of the worsening news of  the spill and the photos of birds, turtles and even bugs soaked with oil, there has been a nagging worry about contaminents.  When I started to hear about hazmat suits and fishermen complaining of health concerns, my thoughts went to what about all the pregnant women living and breathing down on the gulf?

Now, the CDC has come out with an information page addressing many of the concerns for pregnant women.  It addresses the air quality, smell, burning oil, dispersants, safety of the drinking water as well as fish and seafood.  If you  are living in a gulf state or know someone who is, please read this and pass it along.