Posts Tagged ‘cervical insufficiency’

On bedrest? Here are ways to combat boredom

Monday, December 30th, 2013

bedrestIf you’re pregnant and on bedrest, for all or much of your day, you are not alone.  What can you do to still feel productive and connected to the world during this time?Here are some suggestions:

Let things that don’t matter… go! (or get some pixie dust)

It is next to impossible to have your house run as well as if you were not on bedrest… unless of course you have a Fairy Godmother.  But, in the absence of a magic wand or pixie dust, lower your expectations on how clean or orderly your home will be at the moment. Then you won’t stress about what is not done. In other words, cut yourself a break when it comes to how you usually get things done.  You are giving yourself time off. Think of it as “forced relaxation.”  Once your baby is here, these moments will be few and far between.

Misery loves company and virtual hugs

Log on to Share Your Story, the March of Dimes’ online community. There is a thread specifically for pregnant ladies on bedrest. Just “talking” with other women in the same situation will be supportive and comforting. Get your virtual hugs on a daily basis here!

Hello out there!…Stay in touch

A laptop can be a lifesaver. Now is a great time to try and stay in touch with friends whose friendships often fade due to lack of correspondence. Contact every friend that you have who lives out of state or out of the country. Once the baby arrives, keeping up with friends will be harder to do, so getting a jump on it now could be helpful. Then take the next step and put your address book on your computer to create labels for when you mail invitations, baby announcements or holiday cards.

Learn mini moves

Muscles become weak and atrophy (break down) when your body doesn’t move around. It happens very quickly. Ask your doctor if you can have a physical therapist visit you at home and give you some light exercises to do while you are in bed.  No double leg lifts, sit-ups or crunches please. Isometric exercises (where you tighten and release your muscles) may be just what you need. These minimal movements will help to keep some of your muscles from losing strength. Also, soft, gentle stretches and ankle rolls (moving your toes around in circles) will help with leg circulation and swelling. But, don’t take on any movements or exercises without your doc’s nod of approval first. And, remember, once your baby is here, you can gradually get back to your pre-pregnancy strength and body (after your doc gives you the go-ahead).

Work on your recipe collection

If you cut and clip recipes from magazines and have them stuffed into a drawer to organize “one day,” this may be just the right time. You can create a file on your computer and then have someone scan the recipes for you to upload. Then, organize your computer file by food group so you can easily find a recipe when you want it.

Update the baby book

If you have other children and still have not organized their baby books, this could provide you with the disciplined time to get it done. Keep markers, scissors, glue, tape and stapler on your night table and chip away at updating the book a little at a time. You’ll be so glad to have this keepsake to remember every precious milestone and moment.

Although research has not proved that bedrest is effective, it is still a common method of treatment for cervical insufficiency or other pregnancy problems. Many doctors recommend bedrest for conditions like high blood pressure, bleeding or carrying multiples that increase their risk of going into preterm labor. Whatever the reason for your bedrest, hopefully, your bed will become your new command central and your projects will help the time to fly by quickly.

What has worked for you?  We’d love to have you share your survival strategies.

Chat on bed rest

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

bed restMany of you have had difficult pregnancies that have included bed rest. A health care provider may tell a mom to stay in bed due to spotting, early contractions or other signs of preterm labor. Conditions like high blood pressure, bleeding or carrying multiples may increase the risk of going into preterm labor. In cases of cervical insufficiency (CI), when the cervix opens before it should, bed rest may ease pressure on the cervix.

Join us for a chat on bed rest. Share your experience and tell us about the different things that helped keep you sane during this period. Our guest will be Angela Davids from Keep ‘Em Cookin. Jump in and ask questions any time. You’ll find us on Twitter @modhealthtalk, Thursday Nov. 7th at 1 PM ET. Be sure to use #pregnancychat to fully participate. We look forward to chatting with you then.

What is cervical insufficiency?

Monday, August 16th, 2010

Cervical insufficiency (sometimes called incompetent cervix) refers to a cervix that opens too early during pregnancy, usually without pain and contractions. This most often occurs in the second or early third trimester of pregnancy, resulting in late miscarriage or premature birth. A woman may be diagnosed with cervical insufficiency based largely on this history. There is no specific diagnostic test.

Medical experts don’t always know why cervical insufficiency occurs. Factors that may contribute include:
• Uterine defects: Women with certain uterine defects, such as bicornuate uterus (two cavities), are more likely to have cervical insufficiency than women without these defects.
• History of surgical procedures involving the cervix: These include LEEP (loop electrosurgical excision procedure), which is used to diagnose and treat abnormal cells found during a Pap test.
• Injuries during a previous birth.
• Short cervix: The shorter the cervix, the more likely the woman is to have cervical insufficiency. In some cases, a short cervix can be congenital.

Miscarriage and premature birth due to cervical insufficiency frequently happen again in another pregnancy. These problems can sometimes be prevented with a procedure called cerclage, in which the provider places a stitch in the cervix to keep it from opening too early. The provider removes the stitch when the woman is ready to give birth.

It is not always clear which women will benefit from cerclage. This is because there is no specific test for cervical insufficiency, and many women who have had a late miscarriage or early premature birth go on to have normal pregnancies without treatment. Some studies suggest that cerclage is most likely to be beneficial in women who have had three or more late miscarriages or premature births. In some cases, providers may monitor a woman suspected of having cervical insufficiency with repeated vaginal ultrasounds to see if her cervix is shortening or showing other signs that she may give birth soon. The provider may recommend cerclage if these changes occur.

Some women learn that they have a short cervix during a routine ultrasound. Most of these women do not end up having a premature birth. However, short cervix, especially a very short cervix (less than 15 millimeters), does increase her risk of premature birth. Studies suggest that treatment with the hormone progesterone (17P) may help reduce the risk of premature birth in women with a very short cervix. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), progesterone treatment may be considered for these women. However, ACOG does not recommend routine cervical-length screening for low-risk women.