Posts Tagged ‘colostrum’

How to establish your milk supply while your preemie is in the NICU

Monday, August 8th, 2016

kangaroo-care-23If your baby is in the NICU, you may not be able to breastfeed the way you imagined. But providing your preemie with your breast milk will give her the best start in life.

Here are some tips to help establish your milk supply:

Ask for support

Seek out the help of a Lactation Consultant. She is a person with special training to help women breastfeed. A Lactation Consultant will be the best person to assist you with your breastfeeding goals. Your partner, friends and family are also there to support you during this important time.

Pump or express your milk early

Your milk is designed to meet your baby’s needs, so even though your baby was born early, the milk you make in the early days has a higher amount of antibodies to help her fight off infection. If your preemie is too small, sick or has birth defects that prevent her from breastfeeding, pump or hand express your milk as soon as possible. Your Lactation Consultant will be able to help you find the pump that works best for you. Ask your consultant if the milk you pump can be given to your baby in the NICU.

Spend time with your baby

If your baby’s nurse says it is OK, practice skin-to-skin or kangaroo care with your preemie. Not only is this beneficial for your baby, but having her so close will help you make more breast milk. Pumping or expressing your milk right after holding your baby skin-to-skin, or just smelling your baby’s scent, is an effective way to increase your supply as well.

Keep track & increase supply

Massage your breasts before and during your pumping session to maximize your output and improve the flow of your milk. Keep track of your pumping sessions with a log or notebook. This will help you remember how often you pump and how much milk you express. New moms get very tired – a log will help you remember when you last pumped. If you have questions or concerns, speak with your consultant and discuss your pumping log.

Where’s my milk?

After you give birth, you will start to see drops of colostrum, which is incredibly beneficial for your baby. In the beginning you may find it is easier to express your colostrum by hand into a spoon to feed directly to your baby. If you pump, these drops may get stuck in your breast pump parts. Have your consultant show you the best technique. Keep in mind, if you pump, you may not see any milk during your first few pumping sessions – do not be discouraged. Keep at it and ask your consultant for help and support.

Remember to avoid smoking, caffeine and alcohol. Speak with your health care provider about any medications you may be taking to be sure they are safe to take while breastfeeding.

Bottom line:

Stay positive. A pump can’t replace a warm baby at your breast, but any breast milk you supply your baby will help him get stronger and healthier each day. And soon he will be out of the NICU and in your arms!

Colostrum: why every drop counts

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

mom breastfeeding newbornI’ve heard many new moms say they “have no milk” after giving birth and are worried their baby won’t be able to feed. The good news is women have drops of colostrum after they give birth for several days until they start to see their milk come in. You may even see these drops during pregnancy; this is normal.

What is colostrum?

In the first few days after giving birth, your breasts will make a thick, yellowish form of breast milk. This liquid has nutrients and antibodies that your baby needs in the first few days of life before your breasts start to make milk.

Why is it yellow?

This is because colostrum has a higher concentration of protein and antibodies to help protect your baby in her new environment. Think of colostrum as your baby’s first vaccine.

Is it enough?

For healthy, full-term babies, your colostrum is the right amount of food in the early days. At one day old, your baby’s stomach is the size of a marble (5-7 ml), so she is not able to handle a larger amount of milk. Colostrum is easily digested and will help her pass meconium (early stools) which aids in getting rid of excess bilirubin to help prevent jaundice.

The small drops of colostrum you see in the days after birth are important for your baby, especially if she was born prematurely. So as you are bonding with your new arrival and getting acquainted with each other, know your colostrum is providing her with the best start.