Posts Tagged ‘diapers’

Help for moms and babies after Sandy

Friday, November 9th, 2012

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March of Dimes staff and volunteers collected $10,000 worth of diapers donated by Kmart and Kimberly Clark for New Jersey babies in need following Superstorm Sandy. The cartons, loaded by members of fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha, were delivered by Farmers Insurance trucks to two locations in Hillside and Sayreville. Thank you to these wonderful people who helped so much.

More deliveries are planned for other sites in New Jersey and New York.

The March of Dimes has set up a special new baby registry at http://tinyurl.com/ac265gq  where people can purchase diapers, formula and other essentials that the March of Dimes will deliver to infants and families in need.

“We thank Kmart and Farmers Insurance for their generosity toward the moms and babies of our region whose homes and lives were damaged by Superstorm Sandy,” said Dr. Jennifer L. Howse, president of the March of Dimes. “The resources we’ve gathered will take care of some of their greatest needs right now.” We’d love to have your help.

Treating diaper rash

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

diaper-offMy one year old granddaughter is taking antibiotics for a nasty ear infection and her poor fanny is aflame. The meds have triggered a bout of diarrhea and her little butt cheeks are bright red.  I know that when the diarrhea stops the diaper rash will end, but what’s best to do in the meantime?  It has been a while… I looked it up.

The best treatment is to let her run around in the buff to air dry as long as possible, but she lives in Vermont where it’s already snowing.  Next best is to try to change her diaper as soon as it is soiled or wet – not an easy task, especially those days she is in day care. Chemicals in urine and digestive agents in stool attack the skin and increase irritation.  When changing her, we don’t use soap, because soap can irritate the skin further.  We use plain water instead of diaper wipes because they can irritate, too. Once clean, slathering on petroleum jelly as a protective coating can help, especially if it has lanolin in it.

This whole experience makes me think of the many moms who are struggling to provide enough diapers for their babies. Did you know that 1 in 20 American moms struggling with diaper need have had to clean out and reuse wet or soiled disposable diapers? The March of Dimes is partnering with HUGGIES® Every Little Bottom in an effort to address this issue of diaper need and help get diapers to babies in need.  Learn more about the importance of diaper banks, how the March of Dimes is helping and what you can do.  You will find links to diaper banks in our previous post and the comments that follow it.

Diaper banks fill a serious need

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010

babiesBabies… diapers – goes without saying.  But diapers can be an outrageous hit to an already strained budget.  Having a baby costs a lot of money and buying diapers is a big part of that.  And what if you are one of the many who have been laid off from work and don’t have the income for diapers right now?  Did you know that diaper banks exist to provide free diapers to low-income families?

Diaper banks operate like food banks. They collect, store and distribute diapers to families who are having financial difficulties and can’t afford them. Diaper banks get the diapers in various ways: donations by individuals and local retailers, local diaper drives and other activities, and purchases made through fundraising dollars. And while some diaper banks give diapers directly to families in need, they’re usually distributed by local social service agencies such as women’s shelters, food pantries, publicly-funded daycare centers, and through local church programs.

A groundbreaking study reveals 1 in 3 American mothers struggle to provide diapers for their babies. These mothers have had to cut back on basics such as food, utilities like heat or electricity, or even child care in order to provide enough diapers. The March of Dimes is partnering with HUGGIES® Every Little Bottom in an effort to address this issue of diaper need and help get diapers to babies in need.  To kick off the program, HUGGIES® will donate up to 20 million diapers in the United States in the next eight months. As a start, in June, Huggies donated two million diapers given to ten local diaper banks across the country.  The March of Dimes is spreading the word about this essential need.

At the moment, there are only a handful of diaper banks in the nation. HUGGIES® created Every Little Bottom to help support their local work and also to help make millions of diapers available across the U.S.  Read more about the HUGGIES® diaper bank partners and where you can locate a diaper bank.  You might want to consider helping to start one, too.

‘Momnesia’

Monday, November 30th, 2009

19084068_thbAll weekend long I kept asking myself, “what am I forgetting?” It was driving me crazy. I knew there was something I was supposed to do. Then I logged onto the computer this morning and it dawned on me. I forgot to write a blog post for Friday. DOH!  I hate to admit that I have a memory problem (especially to colleagues), but unfortunately this is just one out of a hundred examples that I can give about the mental fog that I’m in.

I almost forgot my wedding anniversary recently. Good thing he brought it up the day before and I had a chance to run out and grab a card. I walk into a room and completely forget what I was intending to do. I can never find my cell phone. I have to keep sticky-notes on the computer screen, frig and in my car to serve as reminders. Put gas in car. Buy diapers. Call sister for her birthday. Take baby for flu shot. If it’s not in writing it’s not getting done. I actually just remembered that there are wet towels in the washing machine from two days ago. Gross.

This wasn’t always the case. I was sharp once, or so I thought. I wonder if I ever will be again or is this it? I’ve done a little reading and although researchers can’t explain all the ways motherhood affects a woman’s memory, they agree it can happen. Plummeting hormone levels after delivery, fatigue, stress/anxiety, drastically changed priorities and breastfeeding might be the culprits.

I wanted to end this post with a funny story, but unfortunately I can’t think of one, so that’s that.  Have a good day and please feel free to share your favorite ‘momnesia’ moment.

The diaper debate

Friday, October 9th, 2009

36823629_thbGees…I just did the math and figured out that I’ve used approximately one thousand, four hundred and seventy-two disposable diapers in eight months. We go through a case of 184 diapers about every three to four weeks.  Including wipes, that’s almost seventy bucks a month. I’m going on a diaper run later this afternoon. Should I try cloth diapers? I’m a little nervous about the idea. Do they leak? I don’t know anyone personally who has tried them. The disposable ones are easy. My daughter’s skin has been so healthy, but I want to be environmentally friendly.  Saving some cash wouldn’t be bad either.

The choice between using cloth or disposable diapers is a matter of personal preference. Deciding which one is best depends on several factors including lifestyle, concern for the environment, cost, convenience, skin care and other health concerns.  While researching the advantages and disadvantages of both, I came across this helpful info on the Consumer Reports website. Click here to check it out.

What do you think I should do?

Dealing with diaper rash

Friday, July 24th, 2009

diapersRed bottom, baby got ‘em?  It’s probably a type of diaper rash caused by any number of things.  Babies who poop a lot and are in contact with the stool for prolonged periods can get a sore bum.   Babies who are starting solid foods can react to the changes in digestion with a red or raw bottom.  The same negative reaction can occur if your baby is taking antibiotics – or if you are taking them and you’re breastfeeding –  because these meds can cause yeast organisms to flourish.  (Yeast infections usually won’t go away on their own and need medical treatment.  If the rash is located on the thighs, genitals and lower abdomen, rather than the buttocks, give your baby’s doc a call.)

The best way to tackle diaper rash is to take action as soon as you see redness.  The more irritated the skin gets, the harder it is to clear up.
• Check and change your baby’s diaper often – a.s.a.p. when she poops.
• Stop using baby wipes – they can irritate the skin more.  Instead, flush the area with warm water (did you keep that squirt bottle they gave you in the hospital?) and pat it dry.
• Avoid using baby powder.  It doesn’t really work and inhaling talc is a proven health risk.
• Don’t use rash creams that contain boric acid, camphor, phenol, menthyl salicylate or compound of benzoin tincture. They can be harmful to delicate skin.
• Cloth diapers without a plastic pants are helpful.  Make sure the diapers are washed in a baby-friendly detergent and are rinsed well.  Don’t use fabric softener.
• Let your baby’s tiny heinie stay naked and exposed to the air several times a day.  A little sunshine can be helpful, but be very careful about sunburn!

Have your baby’s doc check the rash if it shows signs of infection (bumps, pimples, small ulcers appear), if your baby has a fever or isn’t eating well, the rash starts spreading to other body parts, or the rash hasn’t improved within a few days, despite all your efforts.

What do you really need to buy for a new baby?

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

crib1Shopping for a baby-to-come is great fun and, if you’re like most expectant parents, you’ll want to get the best of everything for your little one. If you have unlimited resources, that’s fine, but these days most of us are keeping track of every penny. Give some thought to what items really need to be top-of-the-line, or even on your list. Be realistic.  There may be a huge difference between what you want and what you need.  Seek out sales and don’t forget the Internet; many of the pregnancy and baby sites have great stores and great deals.  Make a list of “must haves” and be careful around all the super cute theme products – it’s hard to stop when there are 37 matching items!

What do you really need? Diapers! Think about going green and using washable cloth – save money and the environment. You really should buy a new car seat for your baby, and a new crib if you can afford one. But if you buy these items used, or borrow them, be sure they meet current safety standards.  Read Consumer Reports information on safe products.  Do you need a cradle or bassinet?  Not really.  I know a couple who lived in a tiny apartment for the first two or three months after the baby was born.  They had no room for furniture so they emptied a bureau drawer, bought a mattress that just fit in the drawer (they come in lots of sizes), put the drawer on the floor near them and had an instant bed for Junior.  That covered their bases for about three months, when they moved into a larger space and bought a crib.

Chat with your friends and relatives about starting a clothes swap.  Babies outgrow their clothes much faster than they wear them out.  It’s very helpful to rotate clothes from a larger baby to a smaller one, especially if you live in a cold climate in the winter where snowsuits and other gear are a must.  Save the fancy new duds that the grandparents give you for special occasions and use the recycled ones everyday.  What suggestions do you have?

Financial planning for baby

Thursday, December 18th, 2008

If you’re planning to have a baby now is the best time to examine your household earnings and expenditures. I’m learning first hand that having a baby can really put a dent in your wallet. Our little one isn’t due for another two months and I can’t believe what we’ve spent so far.

Getting the nursery ready included new paint, carpeting, decorations and furniture. Maternity clothes — from sweaters and jeans to PJs and office wear (holy cow…have you ever seen maternity underwear!?! Not good.) I treated myself to a full body pillow and a couple of extra cleanings at the dentist. Books for both me and my husband on baby names, breastfeeding and baby care. We registered for a childbirth education course and hired a doula to help us during labor and delivery. We’re ordering close to seventy birth announcements not including postage.  Little newborn under shirts and onesies, diapers, wipes and just a ton of unexpected accessories. And how much is college tuition going to cost in 18 years?

According to Rosetta Jones, a vice president at VISA USA, “the smartest thing you can do is sit down before you have your baby and map out a financial plan.” Click here to check out their baby budgeting calculator. If you plan ahead, these new costs will be easier to manage.