Posts Tagged ‘flu shot during pregnancy’

It’s time to get your flu shot

Monday, November 6th, 2017

The flu is more than just a runny nose and sore throat, it can make you very sick. And since the flu shot is safe during pregnancy, now is the time to get yours.

Why is the flu dangerous during pregnancy?

Health complications from the flu, such as pneumonia, can be serious and even deadly, especially if you’re pregnant. If you get the flu during pregnancy, you’re more likely than other adults to have serious complications.

Pregnant women who get the flu are more likely than women who don’t get it to have preterm labor (labor that happens before 37 weeks of pregnancy) and premature birth (birth that happens before 37 weeks of pregnancy).

Fever from the flu early in pregnancy may be linked to birth defects, like neural tube defects, and other problems in your baby. A birth defect is a health condition that is present at birth. Birth defects change the shape or function of one or more parts of the body. They can cause problems in overall health, how the body develops, or in how the body works. Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain and spinal cord.

Protect yourself

The flu shot contains a vaccine that helps prevent you from getting the flu. The flu shot can’t cause the flu and it’s safe to get a flu shot any trimester during pregnancy. As the flu season is during the fall and winter, it’s best to get it now. Tell your health care provider if you have any severe allergies or if you’ve ever had a severe allergic reaction to a flu shot. Severe allergic reactions to flu shots are rare, but if you have a life-threatening allergy to any flu vaccine ingredient, like egg protein, don’t get the flu shot.

Not pregnant?

You should still get your flu shot. Everyone 6 months and older should get an annual flu shot. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop full protection against the flu. Getting the flu vaccine is especially important for children 6 months and older, children with special needs, pregnant women and other high-risk groups.

Need more reasons to get your flu shot? We have 10 right here.

It’s time to schedule your flu shot

Friday, September 29th, 2017

The flu is more than just a runny nose and sore throat. It’s a serious disease that can make you very sick. The flu can be especially harmful if you get it during pregnancy or right after you’ve had your baby. Although it is only September, flu season is fast approaching. So now is the time to schedule flu shots for you and your whole family.

Who should get the flu vaccine?

Everyone 6 months and older should get an annual flu shot. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop full protection against the flu. Getting the flu vaccine is especially important for children over 6 months, children with special needs, pregnant women and other high-risk groups.

Do you need to get a flu shot every year?

Yes! Flu viruses change every year, so just because you got a flu shot last year, doesn’t mean that you are protected this year. The flu shot is designed to protect against the flu viruses that are predicted to be the most common during the flu season. Also, immunity from vaccination decreases after a year. For these reasons, everyone needs a flu vaccine every year.

Are flu shots safe for pregnant women?

YES! All women who are pregnant should get a flu shot. It is safe to get the flu shot during pregnancy and it will protect you and your baby from serious health problems during and after pregnancy. However, remember that if you’re pregnant, the flu mist is not safe to use during pregnancy.

Why is the flu so harmful during pregnancy?

The flu can be dangerous during pregnancy because:

  • Pregnancy affects your immune system. During pregnancy your immune system doesn’t respond as effectively to viruses and illnesses. This means you are more likely to catch the flu.
  • You are more likely to have serious complications. Health complications from the flu, such as pneumonia and bronchitis, can be very serious and even deadly.
  • Pregnant women who get the flu are more likely to have preterm labor and premature birth (before 37 weeks).

Will getting a flu shot protect your baby?

Getting the flu shot during pregnancy helps to protect your baby from the flu after he’s born. If you get the flu shot during pregnancy, you pass on your immunity to your baby. Some studies have shown that vaccinating a pregnant woman can give her baby antibodies to protect against flu for several months after birth. You baby should get his own flu vaccine at 6 months.

Where can you get a flu shot?

You can get the vaccine from your health care provider. Many pharmacies and work places also offer it each fall. You can use the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to find where the flu vaccine is available in your area.

The flu shot is the best way to protect you and your baby from the flu. You can learn more at flu.gov.

Have any questions? Email or text us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

It’s not too late to get a flu shot

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

flu shot pregnant womenYou may think that flu season is almost over, but that is not the case. Flu activity is still increasing across the country and it is expected to continue for several weeks.

According to the CDC, the timing of the annual flu season is very unpredictable. Flu viruses can be detected year-round, however, seasonal flu activity can begin as early as October and continue to occur as late as May. In the United States, flu activity most commonly peaks between December and March. You can check out the flu activity in your state on this interactive map from the CDC.

It is not too late to get a flu shot, if you haven’t gotten one already. The CDC recommends an annual flu vaccine for everyone 6 months and older. The flu shot is safe for pregnant women and most children but if you or your baby has had a reaction in the past, or is allergic to eggs, make sure you talk to your provider. And if you are pregnant, you can get the flu shot at any time during pregnancy. A flu shot during pregnancy can help protect your baby for several months after birth as well.

A flu shot remains the most effective way to prevent the flu. And this season’s flu vaccines are reducing the risk of illness by almost half. Anyone who has not yet gotten a flu shot this year should get one as soon as possible.

If you do get the flu, the CDC also recommends quick treatment with antiviral medications, especially for people who are very sick or people who are at high risk of flu complications, including pregnant women. For flu, antivirals work best if you take them within 2 days of getting sick. Quick treatment with antiviral medicine can help prevent serious flu complications. You will need a prescription for an antiviral medication so call or visit your health care provider right away if you think you may have the flu.

Flu season is not over, so make sure you are taking the appropriate precautions to help you and your family avoid the flu this year.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

This year, get your child a flu shot, not the nasal mist

Friday, July 8th, 2016

pediatrician and babyWhile many parents (and kids) prefer the nasal mist flu vaccine, evidence shows that the flu shot is the best way to protect your child from the flu this year.

Why should my child get the flu shot instead of the nasal mist?

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is a panel of experts that advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). They looked at data from 2013 through 2016 and found that the nasal spray was less effective than the flu shot.

The flu nasal spray contains a live but weakened version of the flu virus. Typically, vaccines containing weakened viruses are more effective and cause a stronger immune response than vaccines with dead viruses (such as the flu shot). Initial data suggested that this was the case with the nasal spray. In 2014, the ACIP actually recommended the nasal spray over the flu shot for children.

However, during the 2015-2016 flu season, the nasal flu vaccine’s protection rate was only 3 percent. This means that no protective benefit could be measured. Its effectiveness in the previous two flu seasons was also low. In contrast, the flu shot was 63 percent effective among children aged 2 to 17 during the 2015-2016 flu season.

Get vaccinated against the flu every year

There are many different flu viruses, and they’re always changing. Each year a new flu vaccine is made to protect against the three or four flu viruses expected to make people sick during the upcoming flu season. Protection from the vaccine only lasts about a year, so it’s important to get vaccinated every year.

While many parents (and kids) prefer the nasal mist, evidence shows that the flu shot is the best way to protect your child from the flu this year. The traditional flu shot is effective. Both the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend that everyone older than 6 months get the flu vaccine each year. It’s especially important for children younger than 5 to get the vaccine because they’re more likely to have serious health problems caused by the flu.

The flu shot is important for pregnant women too

Pregnant women or women planning to get pregnant also need their flu shot every year (the flu nasal spray was never recommended for use during pregnancy). If you get sick with the flu during pregnancy, you’re more likely than other adults to have serious complications. The best way to protect yourself is to get the flu shot each year before flu season, which runs from about October through May. Even though you’re more likely to get the flu during flu season, you can get it any time of year.

The ACIP recommendation must be reviewed and approved by the CDC director before it becomes policy.

Questions? Email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.