Posts Tagged ‘gestation’

What is a full-term pregnancy?

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

pregnant-belly2The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine has issued a new opinion that defines the length of a full-term pregnancy. This includes the following definitions:

• Early Term: Between 37 weeks 0 days and 38 weeks 6 days
• Full Term: Between 39 weeks 0 days and 40 weeks 6 days
• Late Term: Between 41 weeks 0 days and 41 weeks 6 days
• Postterm: Between 42 weeks 0 days and beyond

We welcome this opinion. The following statement was issued today by March of Dimes Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Edward R.B. McCabe:

“The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ and the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine’s definition of a full-term pregnancy as 39 and 40 completed weeks of gestation is a welcome guideline that eliminates confusion about how long an uncomplicated, healthy pregnancy should last. This new definition acknowledges that the risk of adverse health consequences for babies changes at each stage of pregnancy. Babies born at 39 to 40 completed weeks of pregnancy have the best chance of a healthy start in life. The March of Dimes calls on all health care professionals and hospitals to embrace and apply the definition of full-term pregnancy and move as quickly as possible to implement it in practices and policies.”

When your baby is overdue

Monday, September 30th, 2013

bellyThe average healthy pregnancy is around 40 weeks. Some babies come earlier and others run later. A pregnancy that lasts longer than 42 weeks is called a post-term pregnancy.

Dr. Siobhan Dolan discusses overdue pregnancies in the book Healthy Mom Healthy Baby. Here is an excerpt from the book.

“Although many post-term babies are healthy, some risks do start to increase after 41 to 42 weeks. An overdue pregnancy takes a toll on the placenta, amniotic fluid, and umbilical cord. As the baby grows larger, the chances of stillbirth and delivery injuries go up, and there is a greater likelihood that the baby will experience meconium aspiration (inhaling stool from the amniotic fluid into the lungs) or a condition called dysmaturity syndrome (in which the baby is no longer getting enough nourishment because the placenta is aging and becoming calcified).

“When a baby is overdue, the provider may do some tests to check on the baby’s health. They include:
– Ultrasound exam
– Kick count, which is a count of how many times your baby moves or kicks you during a certain period of time
– Nonstress test, in which a fetal monitor measures your baby’s heart rate for a certain amount of time
– Biophysical profile, which uses a fetal monitor and an ultrasound to score a baby on each of five factors (nonstress test, body movements, breathing movements, muscle tone, and the amount of amniotic fluid)
– Contraction stress test, which compares your baby’s heart rate at rest with the heart rate during contractions induced by a shot of oxytocin or nipple stimulation

“If these tests suggest that your baby is in good condition, you can continue to wait for labor to begin naturally. If they raise concerns, your provider may wish to induce labor or perform a c-section. Providers rarely allow a pregnancy to go beyond 42 weeks.”