Posts Tagged ‘going home after NICU’

Getting ready for discharge from the NICU

Monday, July 31st, 2017

In general, your premature baby will be ready to go home around her due date. But your baby will have to reach certain milestones first. Her vital signsPreemie going home–temperature, breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure–must be consistently normal. This means that your baby:

  • Keeps herself warm
  • Sleeps in a crib, not an incubator
  • Weighs about 4 pounds or more
  • Has learned to breast- or bottle-feed
  • Breathes on her own

What can you do to get ready?

Make sure you talk to your baby’s health care provider and the NICU staff about caring for your baby at home. Here are some things to think about:

  • Do you have everything you need at home to take care of your baby? Do you have medicine and equipment your baby needs? Do you know how to give your baby medicine and use the equipment?
  • Are there any videos, classes, booklets or apps that may help you learn how to take care of your baby at home? Ask about taking a CPR class prior to bringing your baby home—knowing what to do in an emergency may make you feel more comfortable.
  • What do you want discharge day to be like? Do you want family or friends to be there when you and your baby get home? Or do you want it to be just you and your partner with your baby?

Many hospitals let parents “room in” with their baby for a night or two before going home. This can be a good way to practice taking care of your baby on your own while the NICU staff is still right there to help.

Car seat

You will be required to have a car seat before you leave the hospital. Preterm and low-birthweight infants have a higher chance of slowed breathing or heart rate while in a car seat. So your baby may need a “car seat test” before being discharged. The NICU staff will monitor your baby’s heart rate and breathing while she is in her car seat for 90 to 120 minutes. They may watch your baby even longer if your travel home is more than 2 hours.

Follow-up care

Make sure you have chosen a health care provider for your baby. You can choose a:

  • Pediatrician. This is a doctor who has special training to take care of babies and children.
  • Family practice doctor. This is a doctor who provides care for every member of a family.
  • Nurse practitioner. This is a registered nurse with advanced medical education and training.

If your baby has special medical needs, you may also need a provider who specializes in that condition. The NICU staff, hospital social worker or your baby’s general care provider can help you find someone.

Have questions? Send them AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Preparing your home for your preemie

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

Preemie going homeWe often receive questions about “preemie-proofing” from parents who are preparing for their preemie’s homecoming. You may have waited a long time for this day, but bringing your baby home, and leaving his team of doctors and nurses behind can be overwhelming for many parents. Here are some tips to help ease the transition:

Before your baby comes home:

• Speak with the NICU staff at your baby’s hospital. They are very knowledgeable about what your baby may need when going home.

• If you clean your home before your baby’s arrival, (or if you want to brighten up your preemie’s nursery by painting it) do so before he comes home. This way you can avoid any strong smells that may linger.

• Clean your house of dust and germs. Vacuum and dust often, take out the garbage and keep your kitchen and bathroom clean. Also, tell your baby’s health care provider if you have any pets. Pet hair can track in dirt and dust.

• If your baby needs oxygen, carefully observe the cleaning requirements, particularly for the humidifier, and understand the safety recommendations.

Once your baby is home:

• Your baby should not be exposed to smoke, aerosol sprays or paint fumes. These irritants can cause wheezing, coughing, and difficulty breathing.

• Maintain a smoke-free household. Post signs around your house if you need to so family and friends are aware of your smoke-free home.

• The guidelines for cleaning and storing bottles, nipples, pacifiers, breast pump equipment and milk or formula are the same for preemies as term babies.

• If your baby is on an apnea monitor, be sure you can hear the alarm from every room in your house.

• Wash hands after blowing your nose, diapering your baby or handling raw food. Don’t let adults or children who are sick, have a fever or who may have been exposed to illness, near your baby.

Visit our website here for more great resources for parents after they bring their baby home from the NICU.

What do you remember being helpful when you brought your preemie home? What tips would you recommend to new parents?