Posts Tagged ‘healthy eating’

Holiday stress and fatigue

Wednesday, December 6th, 2017

If you’re pregnant during the holiday season, you may feel even more stressed and exhausted than usual.  Traveling, visiting family, cooking, shopping, parties, and preparing for a newborn—your to-do list just keeps getting longer and longer. But during your busy holiday season, remember that it’s important to take care of yourself too!

So what can you do to try to relieve your holiday stress and fatigue? Here are some tips:

  • Rest when you can during the day and try to take a few breaks to renew your energy. If you have some free time between wrapping gifts, put your feet up, read a book or magazine, or watch your favorite TV show. Even just a 15 minute break can help you relax before your next task.
  • Take a walk. Exercise can refresh and invigorate you. If you’re shopping for gifts, walk an extra loop around the mall before you head out to your car. Or park further away in the parking lot–this way you can also avoid some of the awful holiday traffic.
  • Try to limit unhealthy snacks. That can be really tough during the holidays with so many delicious desserts and treats. But too much sugar and heavy meals can drain your energy. It’s still important to make sure that you get enough fruits, vegetables, and foods high in iron and protein. And be sure to drink enough fluids—water is usually best, but you can check out some fun non-alcoholic drink ideas here and here.
  • Keep your scheduled prenatal care appointments. Even if you’re feeling fine, you need to check in with your health care provider. And don’t forget to take your prenatal vitamin.
  • Ask for help. Accept help when a friend or family member offers and ask for help if you are feeling tired or overwhelmed.
  • Cut back on activities you don’t need to do. Instead of spending time making a holiday dessert, why not have your favorite bakery do it for you.

And finally, take a deep breath and enjoy the holiday season!

Have questions? Email AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Holiday foods and pregnancy don’t always mix

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Holiday mealThis time of year is often filled with family dinners, holiday parties and gatherings full of delicious food and lots of drinks. If you’re pregnant or thinking about pregnancy, you may need to reconsider indulging in some of your usual favorites.

Here’s a list of “no’s” and “maybes” to help you through your holiday celebration.

The no’s – foods to definitely avoid

  • Holiday spirits & cocktails: Drinking alcohol at any time during pregnancy can cause serious health problems for your baby. But, this doesn’t mean you need to miss the party – read our tips and substitutions to keep your holiday celebration going.
  • Soft cheeses: Unpasteurized soft cheeses, such as brie, feta, Camembert, Roquefort, queso blanco, queso fresco and Panela can cause listeriosis, a kind of food poisoning caused by listeria bacteria.
  • Raw or lightly cooked eggs or foods made with them, including cake batter, raw cookie dough and soft-scrambled eggs: These foods can contain salmonella bacteria, which can cause another type of food poisoning that can be dangerous during pregnancy.
  • Unpasteurized juice, milk or any foods made with unpasteurized ingredients are also a listeriosis and salmonella risk.

The maybes

  • Eggnog: Store-bought is usually ok, but you must check the label before drinking it. Read how to safely buy eggnog from a store. Homemade eggnog can contain raw or undercooked eggs. Our safe homemade recipe will help you create your own version that you can enjoy worry-free this year.
  • Coffee and hot chocolate: We don’t know a lot about the effects of caffeine during pregnancy so limit the caffeine you get each day to 200 milligrams. This is about the amount in 1½ 8-ounce cups or one 12-ounce cup of coffee. An 8 ounce cup of hot cocoa has 3-13 mg.
  • Holiday ham & meats: Be sure all meat is cooked thoroughly and never eat raw or undercooked meat, which can contain salmonella.
  • Too much sugar: During the holidays, you will find many desserts have added sugar or chocolate, which can put a dent in your healthy balanced diet. If you are eyeing that chocolate pie, try substituting another item with less sugar, to keep your overall sugar intake within reason. For example, switch out your juice for sparkling water with lemon.

With these ideas and a little extra attention to labels and how much you eat, you will be able to enjoy all your holiday festivities.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Fruit and veggies > ice cream

Friday, March 13th, 2015

National Nutrition Month and pregnancyHot fudge, crumbled cookies and sprinkles. These are some of my favorite ice cream toppings. But if you are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, your grocery list should consist of mainly healthy and nutritious foods.

March is National Nutrition Month and this year’s theme is “bite into a healthy lifestyle.” There are many healthy foods you can bite into and enjoy during your pregnancy.

Here are some tips to help you get started:

• Eat foods from these five food groups at every meal: grains, vegetables, fruits, milk products and protein. Check out our sample menu for creative ideas.

• Choose whole-grain bread and pasta, low-fat or skim milk and lean meat, like chicken, fish and pork. Eat 8 to 12 ounces of fish that are low in mercury each week.

• Put as much color on your plate as you can, with all different kinds of fruits and vegetables. Make half of your plate fruits and vegetables.

• Plan on eating four to six smaller meals a day instead of three bigger ones. This can help relieve heartburn and discomfort you may feel as your baby gets bigger.

• Make sure your whole meal fits on one plate. Don’t make huge portions.

• Drink six to eight glasses of water each day.

• Take your prenatal vitamin each day. This is a multivitamin made just for pregnant women.

Knowing what foods to eat more of, and what foods to avoid or limit will help you make healthy meal choices throughout your pregnancy. You can still enjoy the occasional bowl of ice cream with your favorite toppings though, but do so as a special treat instead of a daily snack.

 

 

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

Monday, September 15th, 2014

family playing soccerThere are many things you can do at home to help your child lead an active, healthy life. September provides an opportunity to raise awareness and to get your family moving. Whether your child is at school or home, you can look for ways to maintain a healthy lifestyle for your entire family.

Small changes can make a huge impact. Try things like keeping TVs and computers out of your child’s bedroom or choosing a video game that encourages physical activity instead of one that allows him to sit on the couch. You can also encourage your child to be active by taking a family walk after dinner. Incorporating these small adjustments into your family’s daily routine can make a big difference in your child’s health and well-being.

Things you can do at home:

• Provide plenty of fruits and vegetables, limit foods high in fat and sugars, and prepare family meals at home instead of eating out.

• Serve your family water.

• Pack your child a well-balanced lunch for school.

• Limit computer/TV time to no more than one to two hours hours per day, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Less screen time means more play time.

• Try to keep your child on a sleep schedule; sleep loss can lead to fatigue and increased snacking.

• Look for events happening in your community that promote healthy eating or physical activity.

• Talk to your child’s pediatrician if you have concerns. Although they account for very few cases, certain metabolic disorders or hormonal imbalances can cause weight gain.

For more information on what you can do to decrease childhood obesity, visit here.

Have questions? Email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Click here to read more News Moms Need blog posts on: pregnancy, pre-pregnancy, infant and child care, help for your child with delays or disabilities, and other hot topics.

What’s WIC?

Monday, September 17th, 2012

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children – better known as the WIC Program – serves to safeguard the health of low-income pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women, infants, and children up to age 5 who are at nutritional risk.  WIC provides nutritious foods to supplement diets, information on healthy eating including breastfeeding promotion and support, and referrals to health care.

The WIC target populations are low-income, nutritionally at risk:
• Pregnant women (through pregnancy and up to 6 weeks after birth or after pregnancy ends).
• Breastfeeding women (up to infant’s 1st birthday)
• Nonbreastfeeding postpartum women (up to 6 months after the birth of an infant or after pregnancy ends)
• Infants (up to 1st birthday). WIC serves 53 percent of all infants born in the United States.
• Children up to their 5th birthday.

WIC participants have longer, healthier pregnancies and fewer premature births than those in these categories who do not participate.

If you think you or someone you know may be eligible to receive WIC services or you just want to find out more, visit the WIC website at http://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/. The WIC Prescreening Tool can be used to determine if you may be eligible for WIC benefits. This Prescreening Tool is not an application for WIC, however. To apply for WIC benefits, you must make an appointment at your WIC local agency and you can find your local agency on the WIC site.

A healthy pregnancy diet

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

Dr. Siobhan Dolan goes food shopping to talk about the essential nutrients pregnant women need, and provides tips to maintain a healthy pregnancy diet.

Wash your fruits and veggies

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

eggplantWhen I was pregnant, I couldn’t seem to get enough eggplant. Whether it was sautéed, grilled, roasted or breaded, I had to have it! And since eggplant falls into the veggies section of the choose myplate, I often indulged my craving. When preparing veggies or fruits, I made sure to wash them thoroughly.

Recent studies in Environmental Health Perspectives found that for some pregnant women, being in contact with pesticides during pregnancy may affect their baby’s brain development in childhood. Pesticides are sometimes used on crops to protect them from insects and other organisms. Pesticides can be found in soil or on certain foods like fresh fruits and veggies.

However, don’t shy away from fruits and veggies!  It’s important to get plenty of veggies and a fruits in your meals, especially if you’re pregnant. If you’re concerned about the pesticides on your fruits and veggies, just be sure to clean them well before eating or cooking, even if you plan on peeling the food. If you prefer to buy organic, that’s fine, too.