Posts Tagged ‘heat stroke’

Heat and pregnancy – what’s dangerous and how to cope

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017

heatIf you live in the northeast, you know we’ve been experiencing a heat wave. Just going from my car to the front door of the office seems too far to walk in this heat. If you’re pregnant, having an increased exposure to heat may cause problems for you or your baby.

Exposure to excessive heat affects people differently. When you are pregnant, your body works hard to cool you and your baby. So, if you are pregnant, you are more likely to develop a heat related illness sooner than someone who is not pregnant.

Heat illnesses occur when your body’s efforts to cool itself (eg. sweating) are no longer effective. Heat illnesses include a rash often known as “prickly heat,” cramps, fainting, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion symptoms include a headache, nausea, dizziness, heavy sweating, weakness, thirst, being irritable, and having an increased body temperature.

Heat stroke is an emergency condition. It is when your body temperature goes above 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Symptoms include hot and dry skin or extreme sweating, a rapid pulse, throbbing head-ache, dizziness, nausea, confusion, slurred speech, loss of consciousness, and seizures. If untreated, it could result in permanent organ damage or even death. Seek medical attention or contact 911 immediately if someone you know has these symptoms.

Prevention is key

It is important that you take steps to stay cool and prevent heat related conditions, especially if you are pregnant. Here’s how:

  • Stay hydrated. Drink water frequently. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Stay in rooms with air-conditioning.
  • Avoid going outdoors during peak heat hours (11am – 3pm).
  • If you must go outdoors, stay in the shade, limit your physical activity, and stay hydrated. Use a cold or wet cloth to cool down by putting it on the inside of your wrists or forehead so you don’t get too hot.

Keep kids out of the heat, too

One more thing…each year at about this time, we hear of children being left in a hot car “for just a few minutes.” Tragic deaths from heat stroke can occur from leaving a child in an overheated closed car for a very short while.

Never leave a child unattended in a closed car – NEVER.

Children don’t have the same chemical makeup as adults, making it harder for their bodies to regulate temperature. Take steps to protect your child from heat-related illnesses by setting reminders. Here are a few tips to prevent a tragedy, from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Staying cool in the summer heat

Friday, May 27th, 2016

sunBeing pregnant during the summer can be tough. Pregnancy already causes your body temperature to be a little bit higher than normal. Adding high outside temperatures and humidity can make you feel really uncomfortable.

Here are some tips to help as the summer approaches:

  • Drink plenty of fluids. Water is the best choice. Avoid drinks that are high in sugar because they can make you even more dehydrated.
  • If you are exercising outside, try to do so in the morning or evening, when it’s not as hot. Swimming is excellent option for pregnant women. But if the air quality is bad or you have asthma, try to stay indoors.
  • Your skin is more sensitive when you’re pregnant so it’s very important to use sunscreen. A broad-spectrum (protects against UVA and UVB rays) sunscreen with an SPF 30 or higher is the best choice. And make sure you reapply it regularly, especially after swimming or sweating.
  • Wear a wide brimmed hat to protect not only your face, but ears and neck. Baseball caps don’t protect as well. And don’t forget your sunglasses! They should block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. Dark colors absorb more heat.
  • Heat can make swelling worse. If you experience swelling in your legs and ankles, avoid standing for long periods of time and try to elevate your feet when sitting or lying down.
  • If you do feel overheated, apply a cool damp cloth to your forehead and back of the neck.
  • If you feel weak, dizzy, or lightheaded, or you’re overly thirsty, stop what you are doing and get inside immediately. Drink some cool water or a sports drink and lie down. If you feel worse or if you don’t feel better within an hour, call your health care provider.
  • Be aware of signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke and contact your health care provider right away if you have any symptoms.

By taking the appropriate precautions to deal with the heat, you can have a fun and enjoyable summer.

Have questions? Email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Baby it’s hot outside

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015

heatExtreme heat can be dangerous. High temperatures, especially coupled with humidity, can cause heat related illnesses. If you live in the northeast, you are familiar with the brutally hot weather we have been experiencing.

Here is what you need to know to stay safe, especially if you are pregnant, have a medical condition, or have a baby or young children.

Know the signs of heat illness and what to do:

Heat cramps

  • Symptoms: Muscle cramps in legs or abdomen (stomach area), with or without sweating.
  • To do: Get the person out of the heat – into an air conditioned room, if possible. Gently massage the cramped muscles. Sips of water are ok unless the person is nauseous.

Heat exhaustion

  • Symptoms: Sweating; clammy but cool skin; cramping; dizziness; nausea and/or vomiting; fainting; weak pulse.
  • To do: Bring the person into a cool room with air conditioning. Let them lie down and sponge them with a cool, wet cloth. Let them sip water slowly. If they continue to vomit, get medical attention.

Heatstroke or sunstroke -This is the most serious of heat illnesses. Call 911 or go to the nearest hospital.

  • Symptoms: confusion nausea; dizziness; a fever; headaches; difficulty breathing; rapid pulse; hot, dry skin, sweating or both. Take steps to cool the person off by loosening or removing clothing, going inside an air conditioned room, or cooling them down with a sponge bath. Do not give water or fluids.
  • To do: Seek medical attention immediately.

Avoid heat illness by being prepared -an ounce of prevention goes a long way:

  • NEVER leave a person of any age or a pet in a parked car, even if the windows are open a little. Children die needlessly this way every year. Do not leave them in a car even for a minute!
    Here are potentially lifesaving tips for never leaving your child in your car.
  • Stay inside, in an air condition room. If you must go outside, do so in the early or late hours of the day when it is cooler. Wear sunscreen. Keep outdoor stays brief.
  • Drink plenty of water all day. Limit drinks containing sugar or caffeine and avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • Eat light foods which are easier to digest.
  • If you must be outside, take time to relax in a shady area or go inside a cool building often.
  • Wear lightweight clothing. This is very important for children – if overdressed, their body temperature can rise to over 105 degrees Fahrenheit in a very short time.
  • Take a cool bath or shower.

Here are more tips on how to keep your child cool and safe in extreme heat, from the AAP.

With a little planning and care, you can stay safe and avoid a serious problem.

Heatstroke

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

hot-sunHeatstroke is an emergency condition. A person with heatstroke has an elevated body temperature caused not by illness, but by the surrounding temperature. Children can easily have heatstroke in the summer when playing out in the yard for long periods of time or if left in an overheated closed car for a just a short while.  Tragic deaths have occurred as a result of leaving a child in the car for “just a few minutes.” Never leave a child unattended in a closed car – never.

Children who are not dressed properly for hazy, hot and humid days (this is a classic “less is more” situation) also are targets for heatstroke. If overdressed, a child’s temperature can zip up to over 105 degrees Fahrenheit in a short time.  This is true for high school students as well as babies.

There are quite a few basic differences in the chemical makeup between children and adults. These differences make it harder for children to regulate body temperature than adults. Read what the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has to say about this and take appropriate precautions.

The AAP states that if you ever suspect a child of having heatstroke, take his temperature with a thermometer (just feeling the skin or using temperature-sensitive tapes will not be accurate), remove extra clothing, fan him, sponge him off with cool water and keep him in a cool, shaded place. Once his temperature has dropped, take him immediately to a pediatrician or emergency room for evaluation.