Posts Tagged ‘home pregnancy test’

So you think you might be pregnant

Friday, December 13th, 2013

One of the most common questions that we get asked at askus@marchofdimes.com is “Am I pregnant?” Although we can’t answer that question, there are a few signs that indicate you might be pregnant:
•    You miss your period.
•    You feel sick to your stomach or throw up.
•    Your breasts are big and sore. The area around your nipples gets darker.
•    You crave certain foods. Or you really dislike certain foods.
•    You feel tired all the time.

Not every woman will have all of these symptoms and some women may have none of them.  Every woman and every pregnancy is different, so there is really no way for a woman to know for sure that she is pregnant just by her symptoms.  For instance, some women may think they have had a period, but they actually have experienced implantation bleeding.  Implantation bleeding occurs when the embryo attaches to the lining of your uterus. This may occur 10-14 days after fertilization. Although this spotting is usually earlier and lighter than a menstrual period, some women don’t notice the difference, and don’t even realize they’re pregnant. And many early signs of pregnancy are similar to some premenstrual signs, so it can be very confusing.

If you think you might be pregnant, the best thing to do is to take a home pregnancy test.  Home pregnancy tests are usually more accurate when your period is late – about 2 weeks after conception (getting pregnant). If they’re done too early, they may say that you’re not pregnant when you really are. This is called a false negative. That’s why it’s best to take a home pregnancy test when your period is late. Make sure you follow the instructions carefully.

If you’ve taken a home pregnancy test and it’s negative (shows that you’re not pregnant), you may want to take a blood pregnancy test at your health care provider’s office. A blood pregnancy test is more sensitive than a home pregnancy test that checks your urine. The blood pregnancy test can tell a pregnancy very early on.

Pregnancy tests work by looking for the hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone that a woman’s body makes during pregnancy. If both a blood and urine test come back negative and you still have a missed period, talk with your health care provider. Things like stress, eating habits, illness or infection can cause changes in your menstrual cycle.

Finally, if you are trying to get pregnant, and that test is negative, try not to get discouraged. Nearly 9 out of 10 couples who try to get pregnant do so within 1 year. It may not happen immediately, but the odds are it will happen soon.  You can read more about getting pregnant on our website.

Am I pregnant or not?

Monday, July 11th, 2011

pregnancy-testSo how accurate are those home pregnancy tests? Although they are pretty reliable these days, tests are usually most accurate when your period is late – about 2 weeks after conception. If they’re done too early, they may say that you’re not pregnant when you really are. This is called a false negative. That’s why it’s best to take a home pregnancy test when your period is late. Carefully follow the test’s instructions. Be sure to use the first urine of the day so it’s not diluted by what you might drink. Tests done at a lab or at your health care provider’s office are more accurate.

If you’ve taken a home pregnancy test and it’s negative, you may want to take a blood pregnancy (hCG) test at your doc’s office. A blood pregnancy test is more sensitive than a pregnancy test you take at home, which tests your urine. The blood pregnancy test can detect a pregnancy very early on.

Pregnancy tests work by testing for the hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). HCG is secreted by the pre-embryo after it implants in the lining of the uterus. The hCG hormone is only found in a woman’s body if she is pregnant. If both a blood and urine test come back negative and you still have a missed period, visit your health care provider. Your menstrual cycle can be affected by other factors such as stress, illness, diet, and/or infection. Once the issue is cleared up, your chances of seeing that positive sign may be much improved.

Home pregnancy tests

Tuesday, June 17th, 2008

A home pregnancy test works by detecting a hormone in urine called human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). This pregnancy hormone is produced by the cells that make up the placenta. The amount of hCG increases quickly during early pregnancy. In many pregnancies hCG will double every few days and peak at about eight to twelve weeks.

hCG levels can be detected in urine approximately 12-14 days after conception. A blood test may detect hCG levels sooner at approximately 11 days after conception. Medications (prescription and over-the-counter) should not interfere with a pregnancy test result. The exception would be medications containing synthetic hCG that are sometimes used in fertility treatments.

If you’re sexually active and you have missed your period it’s wise to take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. You can buy one at your local pharmacy. Tests vary so make sure you read the directions very carefully including where it should be stored, when to take it and how to interpret test results. Also, hCG levels vary from woman to woman. Therefore the accuracy of a home pregnancy test might, too depending on when you take it.

If your test comes back positive, please call your doctor’s office. The receptionist may ask you for the first day of your last period and will tell you when to come in for your first prenatal visit. At that appointment you may have another test to measure how much hCG is present in your blood.

If your home pregnancy test comes back negative, wait a few days and take another one. If the test is still negative and you still haven’t had your period call your health care provider for advice.