Posts Tagged ‘insect repellants’

How to prevent mosquito bites

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

The most common way for Zika to spread is through the bite of an infected mosquito. So the best way to protect yourself is to avoid mosquito bites. June 25-July 1, 2017 is National Mosquito Control Awareness Week. The American Mosquito Control Association has some helpful tips to protect yourself and your family and to prevent mosquito bites. mosquito_3D

Drain: keep your environment safe

  • Remove any standing water. Even the smallest of containers can collect water and allow hundreds of thousands of mosquitoes to breed.
  • Check and empty any children’s toys that are outside.
  • Clean pet water dishes regularly.
  • Stay in places with air conditioning.
  • Make sure that screens on doors or windows are intact and do not have any holes.
  • Use mosquito netting across the top of your baby’s stroller or crib to help keep your baby safe from mosquitoes. Keep the netting out of reach of your baby and make sure it doesn’t touch your baby’s face or body.

Dress: wear the right clothing

  • Wear a hat, a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes and socks. Ankles and necks are especially vulnerable to mosquito bites so make sure they are protected.
  • If hiking or camping, wear permethrin-treated clothes. Do not use permethrin on skin.
  • If you are pregnant or trying to conceive and you work outside, talk to your employer about working inside. If that’s not possible, make sure your clothes protect and cover your skin.

Defend: use insect repellant

The best way to protect yourself against mosquito bites is to use insect repellant. Here are a few things to look for when choosing a spray or lotion:

  • Use one that is registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). All EPA-registered bug sprays and lotions are checked to make sure they’re safe and effective.
  • Use products that contain:
    • DEET
    • picaridin
    • oil of lemon eucalyptus
  • When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are safe to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
  • Most repellants are safe to use on babies 2 months and older, but check with your baby’s health care provider.  Do not use oil of lemon eucalyptus on children 3 years or younger.
  • Do not wear insect repellant under clothes.
  • Put on sunscreen first before any bug spray.
  • If you’ve been in a Zika-affected area, make sure to use insect repellant for 3 weeks after you return, even if you do not feel sick. This will help to prevent Zika from spreading to others.

Learn more about Zika on our website:

Questions? Email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Get outdoors but know how to protect yourself

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Family walking outdoorsTomorrow is National Get Outdoors Day. Now that the weather has warmed up, getting outside is a welcomed change in most parts of the country.

But getting outdoors has its own set of challenges – from bug bites to sunburn. Here’s a quick rundown on how to stay safe when heading outdoors, especially if you’re pregnant.

Bugs that bite and spread diseases

Ticks – In many areas of the country, especially wooded areas or places with high grass, Lyme disease is spread by ticks. Untreated Lyme disease can have cause complications during pregnancy.

Mosquitos – If you’re traveling, be sure to check the CDC’s map to see if the Zika virus is active in the area where you are heading. The Zika virus spreads through mosquito bites and through body fluids like blood or semen. If you’re pregnant, or thinking of becoming pregnant, don’t visit a Zika-affected area. Zika virus during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects.

What should you do?

Use an insect repellant (a product that keeps insects from biting you), like bug spray or lotion, that’s registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (also called EPA). All EPA-registered bug sprays and lotions are checked to make sure they’re safe and work well.

Make sure the product contains one or more of these substances that are safe to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding: DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, para-menthane-diol, IR3535 and 2-undecanone. If the product contains DEET, make sure it has at least 20 percent (20%) DEET.

Don’t put bug spray or lotion on your skin under clothes. If you use sunscreen, put it on before the spray or lotion.

If you have children: Most bug sprays and lotions are safe to use on babies 2 months and older, but don’t use products that contain oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol on children younger than 3 years. Don’t put the spray or lotion on your baby’s hands or near her eyes or mouth. Don’t put the spray or lotion on cut, sore or sensitive skin.

Protect yourself from the sun

Nothing will stop your outdoor fun faster than a nasty sunburn. Sunscreen is important whenever you are outside, especially if you are pregnant. During pregnancy your skin is more sensitive to sunlight than it was before pregnancy. The sun gives off ultraviolet radiation (UV) which can increase the risk of skin cancer, give you a bad burn and increase signs of aging.

What can you do?

Before heading outside, lather up with a sunscreen that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher. Use only products that have UVA and UVB or Broad Spectrum protection products. Apply sunscreen at least 15 minutes before heading outdoors and reapply every 2 hours.

If you’re sensitive to sunscreens, try one with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide as they are not as irritating to the skin. You can also cover up by wearing long sleeves and pants, and a wide brimmed hat.

Don’t use products that combine bug repellant with sunscreen. It’s important to reapply sunblock every two hours. If you use a combination product, you’ll be reapplying the bug repellant chemicals as well – not good. Too much bug repellant can be toxic. So, to be on the safe side, keep these products separate, or use the combination product once, and then apply sunblock only every two hours afterward.

Don’t choose a product with retinyl palmitate, especially if you are pregnant. This type of vitamin A has been linked to an increased risk of skin cancer and is associated with birth defects.

Check the expiration date and don’t use it if it is expired. If your sunscreen does not have a date, write one on your bottle after purchasing. Sunscreens retain their original strength for three years.

Here are tips for keeping your baby safe while outdoors.

With a little planning and care, you can get outdoors and enjoy yourself tomorrow. Enjoy!

 

Don’t forget about Zika

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

woman window 2Just because it is winter in many parts of the U.S. does not mean that Zika has gone away. You still need to take appropriate precautions and be prepared. Zika infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and other brain problems in your baby. It also may be linked to other birth defects and pregnancy loss. Pregnant women and their partners need to take special care to protect themselves from Zika infection.

Travel

If you are pregnant or trying to get pregnant, it is best for you and your partner to avoid travel to a Zika-affected area. So if you are planning travel to any tropical climates this winter, make sure you check the CDC website to see if your destination is affected with Zika.

Currently, Zika-affected areas include:

  • The United States, including Puerto Rico. Zika had been spreading by mosquitoes in parts of Miami-Dade County, Florida, but there have been no new cases of people infected by mosquitoes there recently. The CDC says pregnant women and their partners who are worried about being exposed to Zika may want to postpone travel to all parts of Miami-Dade County unless travel is absolutely necessary. The CDC also says that pregnant women may want to postpone travel to Brownville, Texas, because several cases of Zika have been reported in this area.
  • Africa
  • North, Central and South America
  • Pacific Islands

Zika can be sexually transmitted so it is important to use a barrier method of birth control (like condoms) if your partner has recently traveled to a Zika-affected area.

Prevent mosquito bites

If you or your partner do travel to a Zika-affected area, it is important that you both protect yourselves from mosquito bites. Here’s how:

  • Use an insect repellant that’s registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Always follow the instructions on the product label and make sure the product contains one or more of these substances that are safe to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding:
    • DEET (at least 20%),
    • picaridin,
    • oil of lemon eucalyptus,
    • para-menthane-diol,
    • IR3535.
  • Wear a hat, a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, shoes and socks.
  • Stay in places that have air conditioning or screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out.
  • If you’ve been in a Zika-affected area, use bug spray or lotion for 3 weeks after you get back to help prevent Zika from spreading to others.

Getting pregnant

If you or your partner have or may have Zika, when is it OK to get pregnant?

According to the CDC:

  • If you have signs or symptoms of Zika, wait at least 8 weeks from your first sign or symptom before trying to get pregnant.
  • If you think you were exposed to Zika but don’t have signs or symptoms, wait at least 8 weeks from when you think you were exposed before trying to get pregnant.
  • If your partner has signs or symptoms of Zika, wait at least 6 months from his first sign or symptom before trying to get pregnant.
  • If your partner has been exposed to Zika but doesn’t have signs or symptoms, wait at least 6 months from when he thinks he was exposed before trying to get pregnant.

The CDC recommends that you wait at least this long to be sure you and your partner aren’t infected with Zika virus when you try to get pregnant. Zika infection usually stays in your blood for a few days to a week, but it has been found in an infected man’s semen more than 3 months after symptoms started.

Remember, most people who have Zika don’t have signs or symptoms. If you think you or your partner may have Zika but haven’t had signs or symptoms, talk to your provider.

As the spring and summer approach, make sure you continue to check our web article and the CDC website. We cannot predict when or where a Zika-outbreak may occur, so once mosquitoes are biting, make sure you are taking the appropriate precautions and protecting yourself.

The lowdown on insect repellants

Wednesday, July 13th, 2016

Zika - bug sprayProtecting yourself from mosquito bites is key in avoiding exposure to the Zika virus. Here’s what you need to know:

  • Use an insect repellant (bug spray or lotion) that is EPA registered.
  • Products containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, para-menthane-diol and IR3535, are safe to use during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
  • If you use a product containing DEET, make sure it has at least 20% DEET, and always follow the instructions on the product label.
  • Most bug sprays and lotions are safe to use on babies 2 months and older. However, DO NOT USE PRODUCTS THAT CONTAIN OIL OF LEMON EUCALPTUS OR PARA-MENTHANE-DIOL ON CHILDREN YOUNGER THAN 3 YEARS OF AGE.
  • Do not put bug spray or lotion on under clothing.
  • If you are using sunscreen, too, put it on first, before you use bug spray or lotion.

If you have recently traveled to a Zika-affected area, use bug spray or lotion for 3 weeks after you get back. This way, if you are bitten by a mosquito, it will not become infected with the Zika virus and spread it to other people.

Learn ways to #ZAPzika in our article: how to stay safe, how it can affect a baby during pregnancy, and what to do if you think you may have been exposed.

Have questions?  Send them to our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Sunscreen ingredients to avoid

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

sunburned-lady1Most experts discourage tanning whether you’re pregnant or not. When your skin tans, it’s trying to protect itself from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. These UV rays are hard on your skin because they:
• Increase the risk of skin cancer
• Give you a bad burn if you’re exposed to them for too long
• Increase signs of aging

UV rays are bad for everyone, but sunbathing is especially bad if you’re pregnant. Often, your skin is more sensitive to sunlight than it was before pregnancy, so you may burn easily. Sitting under the hot sun (or in a tanning bed) for a long time may make you overheated or lose body fluids (dehydrated). Both of these methods of tanning are bad for your growing baby. Also, UV rays may break down folic acid, an important vitamin that helps your baby’s brain and spinal cord develop.

So, if you are going to be out in the sun, what should you do?

Choose a sunscreen that does not contain retinyl palmitate, has an SPF higher than 15 (30 and up is better), and has UVA and UVB protection. If you are going to be going swimming or sweating a lot, then use one that is also “water resistant.”

Why not retinyl palmitate?

Consumer Reports (an independent rating company), conducted tests and suggest that pregnant women avoid sunscreens that contain retinyl palmitate, a type of topical vitamin A.  Retinyl palmitate “is an antioxidant that animal studies have linked to an increased risk of skin cancers. In skin, it converts readily to retinoids, associated with a risk of birth defects in people using acne medications containing them.”  To help you choose the product that is right for you, read the article on sunscreens as tested by Consumer Reports.

What about sunscreens that are also insect repellants?

Applying one lotion that protects against sunburn as well as bug bites sounds like a nifty idea. But, beware of using products that contain both sunscreen and bug repellant.  When you re-apply the product, you may be exposing yourself to too much bug repellant, which can be toxic.  Please read the warnings of using these kinds of combination products.

With a little knowledge and label reading, you will be able tosunburned-lady choose a product that protects you from too much sun exposure and is also safe.  Then, you can relax and enjoy your summer days in the sun.