Posts Tagged ‘light’

Light and sound in the NICU

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

nicu-baby2We all know that a mother’s womb is the best environment for a developing baby. But when a baby is born prematurely, this environment shifts from the quiet protected womb of mom to that of a bright and often noisy hospital setting. “Developmental care” is known as the effort to provide a preemie with an experience as similar to that of the womb as possible. This is done by making the effort to create a peaceful, stress-reduced environment. It seems to make perfect sense.

Experts agree that sounds should be kept to a minimum, as premature and sick babies are very sensitive to sound. According to the Preemies book, while in the NICU, you should:

• speak calmly in an even tone of voice
• avoid playing loud music
• close isolette cabinets and portholes gently
• avoid tapping fingers or placing bottles on an isolette
• use an isolette cover, which will help dampen noise.

However, not all experts agree on what to do regarding light. Some brain specialists offer the following suggestions:

• dim lights in the NICU
• cover your baby’s isolette with blankets to further shut out light
• use a low bedside light for when your baby needs care
• shield your baby’s eyes from direct light when you pick her up, and
• reduce noise as much as possible.

Yet, other specialists believe that the benefits of shielding your baby from light may depend on your baby’s age – the younger the baby, the more darkness he needs. And some specialists believe that light (as long as it is not glaring) may have positive developmental benefits.

To help figure out what is best for your baby, and to understand more about developmental care, talk to your baby’s neonatologist. You can also read more about it in this book Preemies: The Essential Guide for Parents of Premature Babies, 2nd Edition (2010), which provided the background for this blog post.

Questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Sensory difficulties in children

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Itchy shirt. Icky foods. Hair brushing is a nightmare. Shoes won’t stay on. Sounds make him cringe.
child dislikes food

Picky child or sensory dysfunction?

Our five senses: taste, smell, hearing, touch and sight help us navigate so much of our world. But for some children (and even adults), their senses are especially heightened and can interfere with daily life in a negative way.

•    Taste and smell
Parents often complain that their child can’t tolerate the taste or smell of many foods. Feeding their child becomes a nightmare. When my daughter was little, she would only eat approximately 10 foods (if that). She did not like the taste or smell of most foods and could not stay in the same room when I was cooking broccoli or another offending food.  She preferred sweets to salty treats, and a vegetable would not pass her lips (she would rather die fighting!).  Even if cajoled or bribed (yes – I bribed her) to eat a new food, she would often gag on it because the taste, smell or texture was too awful for her. As she grew up she would relate that she wanted to eat more foods, and was not happy that she had such a limited range of foods she found acceptable to eat. But, alas, it was not something she could control.

•    Sound
child coveringn earsAnother common sensory complaint is that of a hearing sensitivity. Certain sounds or noises are painful to hear. I am not talking about a rock concert or music being cranked on the highest volume. The bothersome sounds could be the barking of a dog, the crinkling of tin foil, the din of the voices in a cafeteria, the sound of a blender, hair dryer or vacuum cleaner. Typical sounds are abnormally loud to a child with a sound sensitivity and may cause him to cover his ears (at best) or disengage socially (at worst).

•    Touch
Other children are extra sensitive to touch. For example, they hate the feeling of certain clothes against their skin. They dislike getting dressed or undressed, and may have a vast wardrobe but will only wear three outfits! Clothes that are scratchy, have tags or are not soft enough for their skin will be tossed aside.  They may resist going into a bath (or getting out of the bath) due to the uncomfortable sensory changes on their skin. Similarly, applying sunscreen becomes a feat in and of itself.

•    Sight
Lastly, some children are extra sensitive visually. For example, bright lights, flashing lights and the change from indoor light to sunlight can make them close their eyes or head in the opposite direction.

Any one of the above sensory issues can wreak havoc on your child’s life – and yours. Some children have difficulties with more than one sense, too. There is debate as to whether sensory dysfunction is a diagnosis in and of itself, or if it is a symptom of a larger diagnosis (such as ADHD, autism, or another disorder). The important thing to remember is that for whatever reason, and whatever you want to call it, these sensory issues are real challenges in your child’s life.

In many cases, these sensitivities may be reduced through occupational therapy (read this post on OT) and through other kinds of treatments. If your child is extra sensitive, speak with his pediatrician and ask if OT or another kind of treatment may be helpful.

Stay tuned for future blog posts on treatment options and helpful hints for the above sensory issues.

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need and click on “Help for your child” in the Categories menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date (just keep scrolling down). We welcome your comments and input. If you have questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.