Posts Tagged ‘medication during pregnancy’

Managing ADHD during pregnancy

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

According to the CDC, approximately 11% of children 4-17 years of age (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although the condition is usually diagnosed in children, ADHD can continue to affect individuals into adulthood. People with ADHD often have trouble paying attention, controlling impulsive behaviors, or may be overly active.

Non-medical treatments

There are non-medical treatment options for ADHD. Talk to your provider to find out whether they may be helpful for you during pregnancy. Non-medical treatment options can be used in addition to medication or instead of medication. They can include:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: This type of therapy focuses on how to change unwanted thoughts and behaviors. If you have ADHD ADHD, cognitive-behavioral therapy can help with time management, organization, and planning.
  • Coaching: Coaching focuses on helping people with ADHD overcome common challenges such as planning, time management, goal setting, organization, and problem-solving. A coach can help you to set goals, develop a plan of action to achieve those goals, and to overcome any obstacles that may get in the way. Coaches can be used in addition to medication and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Medications

If you are taking medication to manage your ADHD and are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, it is important to talk to your health care provider. Your provider can tell you if a prescription medicine is safe to take during pregnancy. She may want you to stop taking a medicine or switch to one that’s safer for you and your baby. Together you can weigh the risks and benefits of continuing to use your ADHD medication during pregnancy.

You can also reach out to MotherToBaby for information about specific medications and how they may affect pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Have questions? Text or email us at Askus@marchofdimes.org.

Medication before and during pregnancy

Monday, July 24th, 2017

Did you know that 7 out of 10 pregnant women take at least one prescription medication? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the use of prescription medicine during the first trimester of pregnancy has increased more than 60% over the last 30 years. In the video below, Dr. Siobhan Dolan explains how taking some prescription medicines before or during pregnancy can hurt your baby. Learn how to make sure any medicines you take are safe for both you and your baby.

 

 

 

Have questions? Send them to our Health Education Specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Acetaminophen and pregnancy

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

You may have heard about a recent study of pregnant women who used pain relievers with acetaminophen (like Tylenol®) and the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in their children. Lots of women take acetaminophen during pregnancy to relieve pain.

Before you get alarmed, it’s important to note that the study researchers didn’t find that acetaminophen actually caused ADHD.  More research needs to be done to understand the issue. In the meantime, talk to your health care provider if you have any questions about using acetaminophen in pregnancy. And always check with your health care provider before taking any medicine while pregnant.

Valproate for migraines is unsafe during pregnancy

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning women and their health providers that Valproate products, a group of medicines normally used to treat seizures, is unsafe for pregnant women to use to treat migraines. A recent study found that the products may harm brain development in babies, leading to lower IQs than healthy babies later in life. FDA also says women who aren’t pregnant and are using Valproate products should use birth control.

Valproate products are usually used to treat epilepsy, a brain disorder that causes you to have frequent seizures, and bipolar disorder, a serious mental illness that leads to unusual mood changes. FDA says that Valproate products may still be used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder in pregnancy, but only if no other treatment is suitable.

If you’re pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant, talk to your health provider about any medicines you take. Some medicines you take can hurt your baby. Once you’re provider knows what medicines you take, she can tell you which ones are safe and which ones you need to stop taking.

Learn more about the FDA announcement on Valproate.

 

Preexisting back problems

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009

37471567_thbWomen with pre-existing low back problems are at higher risk for back pain, and their back pain can occur earlier in the pregnancy. Back pain is one of the most common problems for pregnant women. Nearly half of all women have it at some point during pregnancy.

Are you thinking about having a baby? Help make your experience as pleasant as possible. For all you back pain sufferers, you need to maintain an optimal level of function now in order to have the least amount of discomfort throughout your pregnancy.

Start off by having a pre-pregnancy checkup. Your doctor may recommend that you be evaluated by a physical therapist or chiropractor. To lessen some of your discomfort, be aware of your posture and exercise carefully. If you use any medication to manage your back pain ask your doctor if it’s safe to use while trying to get pregnant.

Happy lifting and bending!