Posts Tagged ‘medication during pregnancy’

Treating for Two: Medication safety before and during pregnancy

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

 

During National Women’s Health Week this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD) wants to raise awareness about the safety of medicines before and during pregnancy. March of Dimes supports them with this important message.

Many women wonder about the safety of medications during pregnancy. This is a great question that should be addressed. However the information to make educated decisions at times is limited. With this in mind, the CDC revamped their Treating for Two website to make this information easier to access.

Treating for Two is a program that provides information and resources to help women and their health care providers decide together what medication is best. CDC created this website to help close this information gap and to provide evidence-based guidance. This program will support shared decision making among women and their providers regarding medication safety before, during and after pregnancy.

According to the CDC, 9 out of 10 women in the United States take a medication during pregnancy. Chances are that you may need to take a medication during pregnancy or during the first weeks of pregnancy, when you might not even know that you are pregnant. Make sure you always discuss with your provider the safety of the medications he or she prescribes to you. Let him know if you think you are pregnant or if you have been trying to get pregnant. Some medications may cause premature birth, birth defects, neonatal abstinence syndrome (also called NAS), miscarriage, developmental disabilities and other health problems.

What can you do?

If you need to take medications during pregnancy, discuss with your provider all your concerns. Also make sure you:

  • Take the medication exactly as your provider says to take it.
  • Don’t take it with alcohol or other drugs. (Don’t take alcohol or drugs if you are pregnant.)
  • Don’t take someone else’s medication.
  • Don’t stop taking a prescription medicine without talking to your provider first.
  • Ask your provider if you need to switch your medication to one that is safer during your pregnancy.
  • Discuss with your provider all the medications you take, like: over-the-counter medicines, herbal and dietary supplements and vitamins.

For more information about prescription and over-the counter medications visit marchofdimes.org

Managing ADHD during pregnancy

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

According to the CDC, approximately 11% of children 4-17 years of age (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although the condition is usually diagnosed in children, ADHD can continue to affect individuals into adulthood. People with ADHD often have trouble paying attention, controlling impulsive behaviors, or may be overly active.

Non-medical treatments

There are non-medical treatment options for ADHD. Talk to your provider to find out whether they may be helpful for you during pregnancy. Non-medical treatment options can be used in addition to medication or instead of medication. They can include:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: This type of therapy focuses on how to change unwanted thoughts and behaviors. If you have ADHD ADHD, cognitive-behavioral therapy can help with time management, organization, and planning.
  • Coaching: Coaching focuses on helping people with ADHD overcome common challenges such as planning, time management, goal setting, organization, and problem-solving. A coach can help you to set goals, develop a plan of action to achieve those goals, and to overcome any obstacles that may get in the way. Coaches can be used in addition to medication and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Medications

If you are taking medication to manage your ADHD and are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, it is important to talk to your health care provider. Your provider can tell you if a prescription medicine is safe to take during pregnancy. She may want you to stop taking a medicine or switch to one that’s safer for you and your baby. Together you can weigh the risks and benefits of continuing to use your ADHD medication during pregnancy.

You can also reach out to MotherToBaby for information about specific medications and how they may affect pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Medication before and during pregnancy

Monday, July 24th, 2017

Did you know that 7 out of 10 pregnant women take at least one prescription medication? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the use of prescription medicine during the first trimester of pregnancy has increased more than 60% over the last 30 years. In the video below, Dr. Siobhan Dolan explains how taking some prescription medicines before or during pregnancy can hurt your baby. Learn how to make sure any medicines you take are safe for both you and your baby.

 

 

 

Have questions? Send them to our Health Education Specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Acetaminophen and pregnancy

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014

You may have heard about a recent study of pregnant women who used pain relievers with acetaminophen (like Tylenol®) and the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in their children. Lots of women take acetaminophen during pregnancy to relieve pain.

Before you get alarmed, it’s important to note that the study researchers didn’t find that acetaminophen actually caused ADHD.  More research needs to be done to understand the issue. In the meantime, talk to your health care provider if you have any questions about using acetaminophen in pregnancy. And always check with your health care provider before taking any medicine while pregnant.

Valproate for migraines is unsafe during pregnancy

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning women and their health providers that Valproate products, a group of medicines normally used to treat seizures, is unsafe for pregnant women to use to treat migraines. A recent study found that the products may harm brain development in babies, leading to lower IQs than healthy babies later in life. FDA also says women who aren’t pregnant and are using Valproate products should use birth control.

Valproate products are usually used to treat epilepsy, a brain disorder that causes you to have frequent seizures, and bipolar disorder, a serious mental illness that leads to unusual mood changes. FDA says that Valproate products may still be used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder in pregnancy, but only if no other treatment is suitable.

If you’re pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant, talk to your health provider about any medicines you take. Some medicines you take can hurt your baby. Once you’re provider knows what medicines you take, she can tell you which ones are safe and which ones you need to stop taking.

Learn more about the FDA announcement on Valproate.