Posts Tagged ‘mosquito’

Diagnosed with Zika? Help is available

Friday, July 21st, 2017

mom loving babyHave you or your partner been diagnosed with Zika virus? Did you receive a positive Zika test while pregnant? Do you have a baby with Zika? If you answered yes to any of these questions, medical help and support is available.

Zika Care Connect (ZCC), developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with March of Dimes offers a network of specialized healthcare providers who can care for families potentially affected by the Zika virus.

The ZCC network helps you find services and health care providers in your area who take your health insurance and speak your language.

Have questions? Call the toll-free Zika Helpline, 1-844-677-0447, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time. If no one is immediately able to answer your call, please leave a message and your call will be returned within 1 business day.

For more information on help and support available to you, check out the Zika Care Connect website: www.zikacareconnect.org.

For everything you need to know about how to protect yourself from Zika, visit our website.

Have questions? Text or email us at mailto:AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Zika in New York City

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

New York CityIf you live in the New York City area, you may have seen or heard the advertisements about the Zika virus.

There has been an increase in the number of babies born in NYC who have shown signs of the virus.

The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene reports that since January 2017, 402 pregnant women have shown laboratory evidence of the Zika virus infection. Twenty three babies have been born with lab evidence of the infection, and 16 babies have been born with birth defects consistent with Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

It is important to note that all of these cases resulted from either travel to a Zika affected area, or through sex with an infected individual. The majority of the cases are believed to have resulted from travel to the Dominican Republic.

None of the cases are reported to have been due to local transmission, meaning no one became infected as a result of being bitten by a NYC mosquito.

What does all this mean?

Zika is still a threat, especially to pregnant women and babies. If a woman gets infected with Zika during pregnancy, the virus can pass to her baby. It can cause serious birth defects including microcephaly.

The most common way Zika is spread is by being bitten by an infected mosquito, or by having sex with an infected partner.

How can you protect yourself?

  • If you are trying to get pregnant, or you are pregnant, do not travel to areas with risk of Zika.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites by wearing long sleeved shirts and pants, using bug spray, and staying in air conditioned buildings. Learn more about how to stay safe from Zika in our article.
  • If your partner has travelled to an area with Zika and may be infected, use a barrier method of birth control (such as a condom) every time you have sex or don’t have sex at all.
  • If you’re pregnant and think you may have been exposed to Zika, see your health care provider right away.
  • If you think you may have been exposed to Zika during pregnancy and you give birth, be sure to let your baby’s pediatrician know, so that your baby can be closely monitored.
  • You can find special doctors to care for a baby potentially affected by Zika on the Zika Care Connect website.

We’re closely monitoring the Zika virus and its potential effects on women, babies and entire families. Stay tuned for more updates.

Have Zika questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

West Nile virus on the rise

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

mosquitoWest Nile virus (WNV) is a potentially serious illness. It is a seasonal epidemic in North America that flares up in the summer and continues into the fall. Right now it’s raging and health officials at the CDC last week said that there have been 1,118 cases of the disease reported across 38 states, including 41 deaths.

Texas accounts for about half of the cases in the entire country. Researchers believe that this summer’s extremely hot weather following a particularly mild winter is what has led to the largest outbreak ever seen. While Texas is the most heavily affected state, WNV is in every state this year except Alaska, Hawaii and Vermont.
 
The virus is transmitted by mosquitos and is carried by birds. The best way to prevent West Nile virus is to stop mosquito bites. Many municipalities are spraying pesticides in the air. It is recommended that individuals who will be outside where mosquitos may exist should use a bug repellent containing DEET. Stay indoors during dawn and dusk, when mosquitoes are most likely to bite, and wear long clothes. Use mosquito netting over baby carriers and strollers and be sure to repair any broken window or door screens.

Pregnant women may be concerned about the safety of insect repellants during pregnancy. The insect repellant DEET (diethyltoluamide) is among the most effective at keeping insects, such as mosquitoes and ticks, from biting. Preventing insect bites is important during pregnancy because mosquito- and tick-borne infections, such as West Nile virus and Lyme disease, erlichiosis and babesiosis may be harmful in pregnancy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) does not recommend any special precautions for pregnant women using DEET-containing products, when used as directed on the product label.

For more information about West Nile virus, read this information from the CDC.