Posts Tagged ‘NICU staff’

Taking care of yourself while your baby is in the NICU

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

Having a baby in the newborn intensive care unit (also called NICU) can be very stressful for you and your family. There’s so much you need to learn and so many unknowns. It is normal that you focus most of your attention on your baby’s needs, but you also need to think about your own needs. Taking care of yourself can help you stay healthy and feel better. When you are feeling well, you will be in a better state of mind to help your baby.

Here are five things you can do to take care of yourself when your baby is in the NICU:

  • Maintain a daily routine. Having a routine can help you reduce stress. Every day focus on doing things that are good for you, like: eating healthy foods and regular meals, taking a relaxing shower, drinking plenty of water, and getting a good night’s sleep.
  • Make connections with other NICU families at NICU classes, in the family lounge or in the NICU hallway. NICU families may understand how you’re feeling better than friends and family who are not necessarily going through a similar experience.
  • Visit shareyourstory.org, March of Dimes online community for families. Here you can connect and share with moms and families who have a baby in the NICU. You can find support from these parents who also have a baby in the NICU, or are going through similar experiences with their babies.
  • Consider taking breaks from the NICU. It’s OK to make time for yourself and your family. Remember, you need to be ok to be able to help others.
  • Talk to a counselor. Counselors are professionals who specialized in mental health. Talking to a counselor may help you cope with your feelings. A counselor may be someone from the NICU staff or a social worker. The NICU Staff or your health care provider can help you find a counselor.

For more information about the NICU and how to take care of yourself and your baby visit marchofdimes.org

Getting ready for discharge from the NICU

Monday, July 31st, 2017

In general, your premature baby will be ready to go home around her due date. But your baby will have to reach certain milestones first. Her vital signsPreemie going home–temperature, breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure–must be consistently normal. This means that your baby:

  • Keeps herself warm
  • Sleeps in a crib, not an incubator
  • Weighs about 4 pounds or more
  • Has learned to breast- or bottle-feed
  • Breathes on her own

What can you do to get ready?

Make sure you talk to your baby’s health care provider and the NICU staff about caring for your baby at home. Here are some things to think about:

  • Do you have everything you need at home to take care of your baby? Do you have medicine and equipment your baby needs? Do you know how to give your baby medicine and use the equipment?
  • Are there any videos, classes, booklets or apps that may help you learn how to take care of your baby at home? Ask about taking a CPR class prior to bringing your baby home—knowing what to do in an emergency may make you feel more comfortable.
  • What do you want discharge day to be like? Do you want family or friends to be there when you and your baby get home? Or do you want it to be just you and your partner with your baby?

Many hospitals let parents “room in” with their baby for a night or two before going home. This can be a good way to practice taking care of your baby on your own while the NICU staff is still right there to help.

Car seat

You will be required to have a car seat before you leave the hospital. Preterm and low-birthweight infants have a higher chance of slowed breathing or heart rate while in a car seat. So your baby may need a “car seat test” before being discharged. The NICU staff will monitor your baby’s heart rate and breathing while she is in her car seat for 90 to 120 minutes. They may watch your baby even longer if your travel home is more than 2 hours.

Follow-up care

Make sure you have chosen a health care provider for your baby. You can choose a:

  • Pediatrician. This is a doctor who has special training to take care of babies and children.
  • Family practice doctor. This is a doctor who provides care for every member of a family.
  • Nurse practitioner. This is a registered nurse with advanced medical education and training.

If your baby has special medical needs, you may also need a provider who specializes in that condition. The NICU staff, hospital social worker or your baby’s general care provider can help you find someone.

Have questions? Send them AskUs@marchofdimes.org.