Posts Tagged ‘nonstress test’

When your baby is overdue

Monday, September 30th, 2013

bellyThe average healthy pregnancy is around 40 weeks. Some babies come earlier and others run later. A pregnancy that lasts longer than 42 weeks is called a post-term pregnancy.

Dr. Siobhan Dolan discusses overdue pregnancies in the book Healthy Mom Healthy Baby. Here is an excerpt from the book.

“Although many post-term babies are healthy, some risks do start to increase after 41 to 42 weeks. An overdue pregnancy takes a toll on the placenta, amniotic fluid, and umbilical cord. As the baby grows larger, the chances of stillbirth and delivery injuries go up, and there is a greater likelihood that the baby will experience meconium aspiration (inhaling stool from the amniotic fluid into the lungs) or a condition called dysmaturity syndrome (in which the baby is no longer getting enough nourishment because the placenta is aging and becoming calcified).

“When a baby is overdue, the provider may do some tests to check on the baby’s health. They include:
– Ultrasound exam
– Kick count, which is a count of how many times your baby moves or kicks you during a certain period of time
– Nonstress test, in which a fetal monitor measures your baby’s heart rate for a certain amount of time
– Biophysical profile, which uses a fetal monitor and an ultrasound to score a baby on each of five factors (nonstress test, body movements, breathing movements, muscle tone, and the amount of amniotic fluid)
– Contraction stress test, which compares your baby’s heart rate at rest with the heart rate during contractions induced by a shot of oxytocin or nipple stimulation

“If these tests suggest that your baby is in good condition, you can continue to wait for labor to begin naturally. If they raise concerns, your provider may wish to induce labor or perform a c-section. Providers rarely allow a pregnancy to go beyond 42 weeks.”

What is a fetal nonstress test?

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

The nonstress test is a way of monitoring your baby’s health through your skin. This is not an invasive test, meaning it is not performed internally. A nonstress test allows your health care provider to check if your baby’s heart rate pattern is one seen in healthy babies. It checks to see that the heart rate increases when the baby moves around.

The nonstress test usually is performed between 38 and 42 weeks of pregnancy, especially when you’re past your due date, to make sure all’s well with the baby. It can be done as early as the 27th week of pregnancy, if your health care provider feels there are reasons to take a closer look.

For this test, you will sit with knees and back partially elevated, sometimes with a cushion under the right hip to help shift your uterus to the left. Sensitive electrodes (connected to monitors) are placed on your abdomen over conducting jelly. The electrodes can sense the fetal heart rate (FHR) and the presence and length of any uterine contractions. Usually, the results of this test appear on a computer screen, or they are printed out. If there are contractions, the external monitors will show them but they won’t be able to tell how strong they are.

If there is no fetal heart rate increase from being moved around after 30 – 40 minutes, your baby may be napping. Seriously, babies do go to sleep! If that’s the case, you will be given something sweet to drink or a small meal which may perk your baby up and get him moving. If that doesn’t work, the use of fetal acoustic stimulation (sending loud noise to the baby) may work as may gently placing your hands on your abdomen and moving the baby from side to side. Wake up little one!

If your baby still is not as responsive as your health care provider would like to see, you may move on to either a biophyiscal profile (taking a closer look with detailed ultrasound), a stress test (testing to see how your baby responds to contractions) or even delivery.