Posts Tagged ‘nursing’

Breastfeeding: Common discomforts and what to do about them

Thursday, August 2nd, 2018

Breast milk is the best food for your baby. Breast milk gives your baby important nutrients that help him grow healthy and strong. Do not feel discouraged if you have some discomforts when you first start breastfeeding. Many new moms have difficulties. However, with the right support and information, you will be able to breastfeed your baby.

Here are some common problems moms may have and what you can do about them:

“My baby won’t latch-on.”

When your baby’s latched on, her mouth is securely attached to your nipple for breastfeeding. To help your baby latch on, first, find a comfortable place to breastfeed your baby. It could be in a chair, on the couch or on your bed. Remove your clothes from the waist up and have your baby wear only his diaper. Lay your baby between your breasts so that your tummies are touching. Skin-to-skin contact is the best way to help your baby get comfortable and ready to latch-on. Here’s how to make sure your baby gets a good latch:

  • When your baby opens his mouth, bring him to your breast. Bring him to you — don’t lean into him.
  • Hold your baby close. Both his nose and chin should touch your breast. Don’t worry — he can breathe and eat at the same time. Your baby should have a good mouthful of your areola (the area around your nipple).
  • When your baby has a good latch, you will feel his tongue pull your breast deep into his mouth. If you feel his tongue at the tip of your nipple, it’s not a good latch.

“My nipples hurt.”

Many women feel nipple pain when they first start breastfeeding. If your nipples are cracked and sore, you may need to change the position you use to breastfeed. If you have nipple pain:

  • Make sure your baby is fully latched on. If she’s not latched on, remove her from your breast and try again.
  • After feeding, put some fresh breast milk on your nipples. Just like breast milk is good for your baby, it can help you too. Creams also may help. Ask your provider which kind to use.
  • Talk to your provider or lactation consultant if the pain doesn’t go away.

“My breast is swollen and feels hard.”

Your breasts swell as they fill up with milk. They may feel tender and sore. Most of the time the discomfort goes away once you start breastfeeding regularly. Here are some ways to help feel better:

  • Try not to miss or go a long time between feedings. Don’t skip night feedings.
  • Express a small amount of milk with a breast pump or by hand before breastfeeding.
  • Take a warm shower or put warm towels on your breasts. If your breasts hurt, put cold packs on them.
  • If your breasts stay swollen, tell your provider.

With patience and practice, you and your baby can be great at breastfeeding! Give yourself time to learn this new skill and trust yourself. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. You may just need a little extra support to get started. Your health care provider, a lactation consultant, a breastfeeding peer counselor or a breastfeeding support group can help you. Find out more about how to get help with breastfeeding by visiting marchofdimes.org.

Breastfeeding counseling, breast pumps, and supplies are services covered by most health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act, at no extra cost to you. Learn more about recommended preventive services that are covered under the Affordable Care Act at Care Women Deserve.

 

Breastfeeding 101

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

If you’re breastfeeding or thinking about breastfeeding, you’ve come to the right place. This post is your one-stop-shop for all things breastfeeding. Stop in for a quick glance or stay for a while and browse the different blog posts below. We’ll keep adding new ones as they are published.

• Breastfeeding myths debunked

Breastfeeding myths debunked part 2 

The do’s and don’ts of bottle-feeding 

• Breastfeeding your baby in the NICU can be challenging 

• Breastfeeding a baby with a cleft lip/palate  

• Breastfeeding and returning to work 

• Formula switching, what you need to know 

• Alcohol and breastfeeding 

• Breastfeeding on demand vs. on a schedule 

• Keeping breast milk safe

 “Can I continue breastfeeding now that I am pregnant again?”

• Breastfeeding and hair treatments

Keeping track of feedings and diapers

Benefits of breastfeeding

Is donor milk right for your preemie?

Breastfeeding can reduce your stress

Colostrum: why every drop counts

•  How to establish your milk supply while your preemie is in the NICU

• Feeling depressed when you breastfeed?

Breastfeeding and your diet

Breastfeeding after a natural disaster

Is breastfeeding a preemie different than a full term baby?

Breastfeeding and support: two peas in a pod

Dads and breastfeeding

 

 

Breastfeeding in public is getting easier

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

Alcohol and BreastfeedingIf you are a mom who is breastfeeding your baby, you may feel that your social life is sometimes curtailed. Breastfeeding every two to three hours, can make it very difficult to go out to public places if you can’t find a clean, safe place to feed your baby when she is hungry.

Now, take me out to the ballgame just got a little bit easier.

Thanks to lactation rooms and breastfeeding pods which are popping up in all sorts of places, nursing moms can escape to a quiet, private place to breastfeed and not miss any of the fun.

Breastfeeding pods (portable enclosed spaces designed specifically for breastfeeding or expressing milk) are already at somebreastfeeding pod airports, making travel much easier for a mom on the go. They are also popping up at ball parks. Recently, Fenway Park in Boston, MA, added a breastfeeding pod, so baseball enthusiasts need never miss a game.

Before you head out of the house to a public place, call ahead and ask if they have accommodations for breastfeeding moms. You may not have ever noticed or seen a lactation room or pod at the venue. But if you know it is there, you may feel more comfortable bringing your baby along. You will enjoy yourself without missing a feeding. You can also go to the Mamava pod website or use their app to locate a pod.

Another option is to use the Moms Pump Here lactation room locator. It tells you where you can find quiet, clean, safe places to breastfeed or pump. Use their website or download their app for info on the go.

So much has changed from the days when women would breastfeed their babies in a ladies room (ugh) or worse yet – stay home and miss special events. With the known benefits of breastmilk, it is logical that more accommodations are being made for lactating moms, so that they can feed their babies when they are away from home.

Breastfeeding myths debunked – part 2

Monday, June 23rd, 2014

mom breastfeeding1. Your baby needs water too.

False: Supplementing with water is not recommended for babies. Breast milk or formula contains all the water a baby needs and will keep your baby hydrated even in hot, dry climates.

2. You don’t produce enough milk.

Often False: The amount of milk you produce depends on a number of factors, including how often you feed and how your baby sucks at the breast. You can check if your baby is getting enough to eat by the amount of wet or soiled diapers in a day. The American Academy of Pediatrics tells moms to “expect 3-5 urines and 3-4 stools per day by 3-5 days of age; 4-6 urines and 3-6 stools per 5-7 days of age.” Your baby’s health care provider will check if your baby is gaining weight at his well-baby visits.

3. Breastfeeding is easy

False: Breastfeeding can be very challenging. Many moms face sore, cracked and bleeding nipples. It can hurt when you try to feed your baby. It’s important that when you start to feel pain or discomfort you seek help from a lactation counselor or support group. Many times the soreness can be relieved if the latch or position is changed. Some moms are able to breastfeed right away and others experience discomfort for months. Breastfeeding is learning a new skill; it takes lots of practice, time and patience.

4. Breastfeeding reduces the risk of SIDS

True: Breastfeeding can reduce the risks associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Feed your baby only breast milk for at least 6 months. Continue breastfeeding your baby until at least her first birthday. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says “Breastfeed as much and as long as you can. Studies show that breastfeeding your baby can help reduce the risk of SIDS.”

5. My baby should always breastfeed from both breasts

Not always true: Babies, especially newborns may have periods of preferring only one breast. Your baby may cry, become fussy or refuse to feed on one breast. If your baby is getting enough milk and you are not having any other trouble, it is fine for your baby to feed from only one breast. If you are having problems with your milk supply, or experience engorgement or pain, there are tips to get your baby back on both breasts.  For example try starting your baby on the preferred breast, and then slide him over to other side without changing the position of his body. To learn more, ask a lactation specialist.

Did you have an assumption about breastfeeding that was false? Or did someone give you advice that helped? We’d love to hear from you.

Check out the first 5 breastfeeding myths from last week.

Breastfeeding chat

Monday, August 5th, 2013

breastfeedingBreastfeeding can be a wonderful experience, but it’s not as easy as it looks. It may be hugely beneficial to your baby, which it is, but there’s plenty to learn before your little one arrives. Join the experts: Robin Weiss, a doula, lactation consultant and author of Pregnancy & Childbirth at About.com; Dr. Abieyuwa Iyare, a pediatrician and co-chair of the Breastfeeding Committee and Paula Ferrante, R.N., lactation consultant at Montefiore Medical Center; and our good friends at Text4baby.

Let’s talk. Did you breastfeed? If so, for how long? Did you continue to breastfeed after going back to work? What tips can you share with others? Where can we go for help?

According to new data released by the CDC, nearly 1 out of every 2 women in the U.S. is breastfeeding her baby up to the age of six months. That’s excellent news, but it doesn’t mean we can’t use some help in doing it right and getting more support.

Aug. 1 through 7 is World Breastfeeding Week. Join the conversation on Tuesday, August 6th at 1 PM ET. Be sure to use #pregnancychat to fully participate and get your questions answered.

Thank a nurse today!

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

nursesHappy Nurse Appreciation Week to all the incredible nurses out there! Nurses play a critical role in advancing the mission of the March of Dimes. They serve the foundation in so many ways: as health care providers, educators, researchers, fundraisers, chapter volunteers and advisors. Nurses work tirelessly and we can’t thank them enough!

March of Dimes is pleased to honor nursing excellence and pay tribute to hundreds of nurses that are at the front lines of care and have had a tremendous impact on patients and their families. Each year, nurses with various specialties are nominated for Nurse of the Year awards by colleagues and families alike. A prestigious group of healthcare professionals review applications and make award selections in a number of categories. You can take a look at the amazing Nurse of the Year award winners for 2012 from around the country at this link.

Do you know an amazing nurse? Tell us about him or her!

Are rented breast pumps safe?

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

breast-pumpI wrote a post not long ago for nursing moms on types of breast pumps and whether buying or renting was better. Both can be safe and a good option – it really depends on your needs and what your insurance company will cover. A number of breastfeeding women choose to rent or share their friend’s pump and that’s great.

A news release from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (Jan. 14, 2013) reiterates the importance of understanding what type of machine you’re renting and if it is safe for multiple users. If you are going to use a pump that someone else has used, make sure it is a closed system type designed for multiple users. The FDA advised all women who use rented or second-hand pumps to buy an accessory kit with new breast shields and tubing — even if the existing kit looks clean.

To learn more about breast pumps, visit the FDA’s recently released website on breast pumps.