Posts Tagged ‘postpartum’

New baby = new mom fatigue

Monday, October 10th, 2016

mother calming crying babyYou’ve just given birth and brought your baby home – now you can relax right? Not really.

Once you bring your new baby home, new parents (especially moms) are often overwhelmed and exhausted. Between the feedings, sleepless nights and extra responsibilities you will find you’re very tired. You may find it hard to balance the responsibilities of your new baby, your family and your home. So will you have any relaxation time? Not for a while.

Take comfort in knowing you’re not alone and your feelings are normal. Here are some tips to get through your new mom fatigue.

Get rest

Now that you know relaxation is out the door, you can still catch up on some much needed rest. Start by napping when your baby does, even if it’s a quick one. If your baby’s breathing, cooing or restlessness keep you awake, place her in her own room to sleep. Remember you and your baby are top priority and rest is important – if you need to limit your visitors and put off your household responsibilities, do it.

Eat well and keep moving

Staying active can actually help give you more energy during the day. You may already find yourself constantly going up and down your stairs while grabbing a clean diaper or washing a bottle, but if you want to start physical activity, be sure to get your provider’s OK. If the weather is nice, taking your baby for a walk is a great place to start becoming active.

Eating healthy foods and drinking lots of water will also help your energy level. And be sure to limit your intake of caffeine and sugar packed beverages.

Accept help

This is an exciting time and your friends and family can’t wait to meet your new baby. When they come to visit and offer a helping hand, accept their offer. Suggest they wash some dishes, get you a plate of food or simply hold your baby while you take a shower. Working with your partner to divvy out responsibilities or feedings can also help. If you are breastfeeding, have your partner bring the baby to you and burp her after the feeding.

Caring for a new baby is a wonderful time, but when you’re feeling overwhelmed and exhausted remember that the newborn days won’t last long. Accept or ask for help when you need it. Soon you’ll be able to better manage your time and your energy to enjoy your new bundle.

Do you have a newborn at home? Share your tips. Have questions? Email or text

What you need to know AFTER your baby is born

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

mom and newbornIt takes at least 6-8 weeks for your body to recover from pregnancy. Here are some important things to know.


You may experience a wide range of emotions during the postpartum period. You’ll feel joy and happiness that your little one has finally arrived. But many new moms experience the “baby blues.” You may cry more easily, be more irritable, and have feelings of sadness. This is most likely due to changes in hormones after delivery.

The baby blues usually peak 3-5 days after delivery and end by about the 10th day after your baby’s birth. If your symptoms do not go away or if they get worse, you may be experiencing postpartum depression. Make sure you talk to your health care provider.

Vaginal bleeding and discharge

After you give birth you will have vaginal bleeding and discharge. This is called lochia. After your baby is born, your body gets rid of the blood and tissue that was inside of the uterus. For the first four or five days, it’s heavy, bright red and will probably contain blood clots.

Over time, the amount of blood lessens and the color changes from bright red to pink to brown to yellow. It is normal to have discharge for up to 6 weeks after birth. You’ll experience this discharge even if you had a C-section. Use sanitary pads (not tampons) until the discharge stops.

Weight loss

You may be surprised (and disappointed) to learn that the weight you gained during pregnancy doesn’t magically disappear at birth. It takes a while for your uterus to shrink down after it expanded to accommodate your baby. So you may still look pregnant after you give birth. This is completely normal.

With your provider’s OK, you can start light exercises as soon as you feel up to it. Be patient and take things slowly. It can take several months or longer to get back to your pre-pregnancy weight. Walking is a great activity for new moms. You’ll also want to make sure you’re eating healthy foods and drinking lots of water. Both of these things will make you feel better overall and help your postpartum recovery.

Getting pregnant again

It is possible to conceive during the postpartum period. If you are not breastfeeding, your period may return 6-8 weeks after giving birth. If you are breastfeeding, it may take longer.

You may ovulate (release an egg) before you get your period. This means you could get pregnant, whether you’re breastfeeding or not. It’s best to wait at least 18 months between giving birth and getting pregnant again to give your body the time it needs to heal and recover. Getting pregnant again too soon increases your next baby’s chances of being born premature or at a low birthweight. Talk to your provider about when it is best for you to try to get pregnant again.


While most women are healthy after birth, some do experience complications. You can read about postpartum warning signs here. Trust your instincts—if you feel like something is wrong, call your provider. Most postpartum problems can be easily treated if identified early.

These are just a few of the changes that your body goes through after your baby is born. You can read more on our website.

Have questions? Text or email us at

World Thrombosis Day

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

pregnant woman blood pressureA blood clot (also called a thrombosis) is a mass or clump of blood that forms when blood changes from a liquid to a solid. The body normally makes blood clots to stop the bleeding after a scrape or cut. But sometimes blood clots can partly or completely block the flow of blood in a blood vessel, like a vein or artery. This can cause damage to body organs and even death. Blood clots affect 900,000 people each year and as many as 100,000 people die each year due to blood clots.

Risk factors for blood clots

Certain conditions make you more likely to have a blood clot. These include:

  • Being pregnant. Your blood clots more easily during pregnancy to help your body get ready to lessen blood loss during labor and birth. Also, blood flow in your legs gets slower late in pregnancy. This is because the blood vessels around your pelvis and other places are more compressed (narrow) and your growing uterus (womb) puts pressure on your pelvis.
  • Having certain health conditions, like a thrombophilia, high blood pressure, diabetes or being overweight or obese.  A family history of blood clotting problems also increases your chances of blood clots. If you have a family history or a personal history of a thrombophilia, make sure you tell your health care provider.
  • Taking certain medicines, like birth control pills or estrogen hormones. These medicines can increase the risk of clotting. If you’ve had problems with blood clots or thrombophilias or have a family history of these conditions, birth control pills may not be safe for you to use. Talk to your health care provider about other birth control options.
  • Smoking. Smoking damages the lining of blood vessels, which can cause blood clots to form.
  • Having surgery, like a cesarean section. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that doctors help prevent blood clots in women during a c-section. This may include using devices that put pressure on your legs to help keep your blood flowing during the c-section, like compression socks.
  • Being dehydrated. This means you don’t have enough water in your body. Dehydration causes blood vessels to narrow and your blood to thicken, which makes you more likely to have blood clots.
  • Not moving around much. This may be because you’re on bed rest during pregnancy or recovering from surgery. Being still for long periods of time can lead to poor blood flow, which makes you more likely to have blood clots. Even sitting for long periods of time, like when travelling by car or plane, can increase your chances of having a blood clot.
  • Having a baby. You’re more likely to have a blood clot in the first 6 weeks after birth than women who haven’t given birth recently.

Know the signs

Make sure you recognize the symptoms of a blood clot. These include:

  • Swelling, usually in one leg (or arm)
  • Leg pain or tenderness often described as a cramp or Charley horse
  • Reddish or bluish skin discoloration
  • Leg (or arm) warm to touch

If you have any signs or symptoms, contact your health care provider right away. Blood clots can be treated with special medications.

Have questions? Text or email us at

Midwifery – What does a midwife do?

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

midwifeThis is National Midwifery Week, created by the American College of Nurse Midwives to celebrate and recognize midwives and midwife-led care.

A certified nurse-midwife is a registered nurse with advanced, specialized training and experience in taking care of pregnant women and delivering babies. Certified nurse-midwives are licensed to provide care before, during and after delivery.

There are several different types of midwives, each holding different certifications based on their education and/or experience. Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) attend approximately 93% of all midwife-attended births in the United States, and as of 2010 they are required to have a master’s degree in order to practice midwifery.

Midwifery care fits well with the services provided by obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), who are experts in high risk, medical complications and surgery. By working with OB/GYNs, midwives can ensure that a specialist is available if a high-risk condition should arise during pregnancy or labor and delivery.

Once your baby is here, a midwife can assist with questions about breastfeeding (it’s not as easy as you think.) Midwives can provide you with health care in the postpartum period and between pregnancies at well woman visits. They can provide pain medications, birth control, screenings and vaccinations. They treat women from the teen years through menopause.

Here is a link to more information about midwives from the American College of Nurse Midwives.

Your body after baby

Thursday, July 25th, 2013

young-woman-walkingKate, the Duchess of Cambridge, looked radiant as she presented her little Prince to the world for a first glimpse. You may have noticed her baby bump. It begs the question…what happens to your body after you give birth?

Lots of things are happening to your body right after you give birth, especially for the first 6 weeks! Your body is changing again. Some of these changes are painless; others may be uncomfortable.

During pregnancy, your uterus grows to hold your growing baby. After your baby is born, your uterus shrinks back to its regular size. But, it takes some time for your belly to get back to its regular shape after pregnancy. It took time to gain the weight and it will take time to lose it. But don’t get discouraged! Be active and eat healthy foods to help you lose the baby weight. Start slowly, perhaps with a daily walk, and listen to your body as you gradually become more active. And, be sure to ask your provider if you have any issues that you need to be aware of before you increase your activity or begin to exercise.

If you had swelling while pregnant, it may take a while for it to go away after giving birth. Lie on your left side or put your feet up. Stay cool and wear loose clothes.

Your breasts swell, too, as they fill with milk. This is called engorgement, and it can be painful. Once you start breastfeeding, the swelling should go away. If you’re not breastfeeding, it may last until your breasts stop making milk.

Breastfeeding your baby helps your body, too. It increases the amount of a hormone in your body called oxytocin. This helps your uterus (womb) go back to the size it was before you got pregnant. It also helps stop bleeding that you have after giving birth. And, it burns extra calories. This helps you get back to your pre-pregnancy weight more quickly.

Many women feel unprepared for postpartum health issues. For instance, many experience breastfeeding problems, hair loss, hemorrhoids, mood swings, and anxiety. Not all women have these problems, but they are fairly common. All the physical changes and demands of your new baby can make you really emotional, too. Feeling stressed and tired all the time are common for new moms. Some women have the baby blues for a few days after giving birth. If these sad feelings last longer than 10 days, tell your provider. You may need to be checked for postpartum depression.

Remember, it’s normal to feel some discomfort, like soreness and fatigue, as your body heals after giving birth. However, other discomforts and health problems may be a sign that you need medical care. Know the warning signs and be sure to seek help when you need it.

In time, your body should return to “normal.” Every woman is different – there is no one time clock or standard that you should compare yourself to. If you know what to expect, give yourself time and are patient, you will find that it will happen. In the meantime, enjoy every luscious moment with your little prince or princess!


Tuesday, January 29th, 2013

book1Looking for a great gift for someone pregnant or thinking about pregnancy? Order a copy of HEALTHY MOM, HEALTHY BABY, brought to you by the March of Dimes! This new book clearly lays out all the must-know information about every stage of pregnancy, along with research-based advice to help stay healthy and full of energy!

Written by obstetrician gynecologist and medical advisor to the March of Dimes Siobhan Dolan, M.D. and award-winning health writer Alice Lesch Kelly, HEALTHY MOM, HEALTHY BABY (HarperOne; February 2013: Trade Paperback Original) is designed for women at all stages of pregnancy. It provides the most accurate, up-to-date pregnancy health information including information you need before pregnancy, throughout nine months, and into the newborn period. HEALTHY MOM, HEALTHY BABY is a practical, accessible, friendly guide with clear explanations, research-based recommendations, and sensible advice for the healthiest pregnancy possible, and explains the latest advances in:
• Prenatal testing
• Pregnancy nutrition
• Fitness recommendations
• Breastfeeding
• Infant screening and care
• Making your home environment safe
• Managing postpartum symptoms.

The book also provides practical advice every mom-to-be wants quick access to, including:
• A month by month guide showing your baby’s development
• A comprehensive checklist for labor, delivery and beyond
• A glossary of terms women are likely to hear over the course of their pregnancy
• A list of resources for specific circumstances (i.e. pregnant athletes; moms of multiples; and those lacking health insurance).

Learn more at this link.

New mom fatigue

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

wiped-outYou’ve welcomed your beautiful new baby to the world and have now brought him home. Having a new baby can be an exciting and joyous event. But it can also leave many new parents, moms especially, feeling overwhelmed and exhausted. Some moms might feel that compared to the first few weeks of life with a newborn, childbirth was the easy part!

Between the endless feedings, sleepless nights and other responsibilities, many women feel really, really tired in the weeks after birth. You may find it hard to balance taking care of a new baby, yourself, your family and your home. Take comfort in knowing you’re not alone. These feelings are normal. You can take steps to help you find more energy and overcome new mom fatigue.

Get plenty of rest – When there’s a new baby in the home, sleep is on everyone’s mind! Newborns sleep about 16 hours a day, often in about 3-hour periods. In the first few weeks of a baby’s life, it can be hard, if not impossible, for mom to get a solid stretch of 6 to 8 hours sleep at night. Try these steps to help you get the rest you need.
• Sleep when the baby sleeps, even if it’s just for a quick nap.
• Place the baby in the baby’s room.
• Put off other household responsibilities (laundry, dishes, cleaning, etc.).
• Limit visitors.

Eat healthy and be active – Eating healthy foods and getting exercise can help you have much needed energy and feel rested.
• Eat healthy foods.
• Drink lots of water.
• With your health care provider’s OK, get active.

Look to family, friends and others for help – As much as you may want to be “super mom,” no woman can be everything to everyone. If someone offers to help, say yes! Ask your partner, family and friends for help when you need it.
• Share nighttime parenting jobs.
• Ask guests to help out.
• Take advantage of babysitting offers.
• If you can afford it, hire some help for a little while.

Caring for a new baby can be a wonderful time in your life. When you’re feeling overwhelmed and exhausted, remember that the newborn days won’t last long. Soon, you’ll be better able to manage your time and energy and enjoy these first precious moments in your child’s life.

What’s WIC?

Monday, September 17th, 2012

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children – better known as the WIC Program – serves to safeguard the health of low-income pregnant, postpartum, and breastfeeding women, infants, and children up to age 5 who are at nutritional risk.  WIC provides nutritious foods to supplement diets, information on healthy eating including breastfeeding promotion and support, and referrals to health care.

The WIC target populations are low-income, nutritionally at risk:
• Pregnant women (through pregnancy and up to 6 weeks after birth or after pregnancy ends).
• Breastfeeding women (up to infant’s 1st birthday)
• Nonbreastfeeding postpartum women (up to 6 months after the birth of an infant or after pregnancy ends)
• Infants (up to 1st birthday). WIC serves 53 percent of all infants born in the United States.
• Children up to their 5th birthday.

WIC participants have longer, healthier pregnancies and fewer premature births than those in these categories who do not participate.

If you think you or someone you know may be eligible to receive WIC services or you just want to find out more, visit the WIC website at The WIC Prescreening Tool can be used to determine if you may be eligible for WIC benefits. This Prescreening Tool is not an application for WIC, however. To apply for WIC benefits, you must make an appointment at your WIC local agency and you can find your local agency on the WIC site.

HCG diet – is it a good idea?

Monday, April 4th, 2011

The baby has arrived and is growing, but you’d like to be shrinking a little faster.  It takes time to get back to your previous weight and crash diets, while tempting, aren’t really good for you.  It seems the diet fad of the day is the HCG diet. Claims of rapid weight loss and a flat tummy and tush have made this diet quite popular again. But does it work and is it safe? Not so much.

HCG, human chorionic gonadotropin, is a hormone that a woman’s body produces during pregnancy. It sometimes is given to women who have fertility issues. HCG was first proposed to be used as part of a weight loss plan in the 1950s. The HCG diet combines either injections, or nowadays supplements of the HCG hormone (lozenges), with a severely restricted calorie intake – roughly 500 calories per day.  Sure, at 500 calories per day you will lose weight, regardless of what supplement you may be taking, but is that safe? No. As with other crash diets, it is unlikely that you will meet your body’s nutritional needs over time, especially if you’re breastfeeding, through only 500 calories per day. And rapid weight loss can lead to gallstones which can be excruciatingly painful.

Prescription HCG was developed to help women overcome fertility problems. It can have unpleasant side effects, like headaches and fatigue. It was not made for use as a diet drug and has not been approved by the FDA for this purpose. In searching professional literature, no reliable studies have proved that HCG has any weight loss properties, despite years of study.  The best way to lose the baby weight is to eat healthy, exercise and be patient.  It was a good thing to gain that weight while you were pregnant because it helped you have a healthy baby.  But remember you didn’t put that weight on overnight — it took 9 months to gain it and it will most likely take a few months or more to lose it.

After you deliver: Do you know what to expect?

Thursday, January 28th, 2010

mother-and-newbornIf you’re pregnant, you’ve probably thinking a lot about your delivery. What will it feel like? How bad will the pain be? Will the baby be healthy?

But have you talked with your health provider about your own health after the baby has arrived? What can you expect during the postpartum period?

In a recent study, researchers surveyed 724 women 2 weeks after they had delivered a baby. Many of these women said they felt unprepared for postpartum health issues. For instance, fewer than half were prepared to expect breastfeeding problems, hair loss, hemorrhoids, mood swings, and anxiety. Not all women have these problems, but they are fairly common.

So next time you see your provider, take a few moments to talk about the postpartum period. The March of Dimes has several articles and videos that can help.

The new study of postpartum women appears in the February issue of the medical journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.