Posts Tagged ‘Postpartum recovery’

Preeclampsia can also happen after you’ve given birth

Wednesday, May 30th, 2018

Preeclampsia is a blood pressure condition that only happens during pregnancy and during the postpartum period. Women who have preeclampsia develop high blood pressure and may also have signs that some of her organs, like her kidneys and liver, may not be working normally. When preeclampsia happens shortly after having a baby, it is called postpartum preeclampsia.

Although postpartum preeclampsia is a rare condition, it is also very dangerous. Postpartum preeclampsia most often happens within 48 hours of having a baby, but it can develop up to 6 weeks after a baby’s birth. According to the Preeclampsia Foundation, postpartum preeclampsia can happen to any women, even those who didn’t have high blood pressure during their pregnancy. It can be even more dangerous than preeclampsia during pregnancy because it can be hard to identify.

After your baby is born, your attention is mostly focused on his needs. To identify the signs of postpartum preeclampsia you also need to make sure you are paying attention to your body and how you are feeling. Identifying the signs and symptoms of postpartum preeclampsia and getting help right away is extremely important. Postpartum preeclampsia needs to be treated immediately to avoid serious complications, including death.

Signs and symptoms of postpartum preeclampsia may include:

  • Changes in vision, like blurriness, flashing lights, seeing spots or being sensitive to light
  • Headache that doesn’t go away
  • Nausea (feeling sick to your stomach), vomiting or dizziness
  • Pain in the upper right belly area or in the shoulder
  • Swelling in the legs, hands or face
  • Trouble breathing
  • Decreased urination
  • High blood pressure (140/90 or higher)

What can you do?

  • Go to your postpartum checkup, even if you’re feeling fine.
  • Know how to identify the signs and symptoms of postpartum preeclampsia.
  • If you have any of the previous signs or symptoms, tell your provider right away. If you can’t talk to your provider right away, call the emergency services (911) or ask to be taken to an emergency room.

For more information visit marchofdimes.org

What you need to know AFTER your baby is born

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

mom and newbornIt takes at least 6-8 weeks for your body to recover from pregnancy. Here are some important things to know.

Emotions

You may experience a wide range of emotions during the postpartum period. You’ll feel joy and happiness that your little one has finally arrived. But many new moms experience the “baby blues.” You may cry more easily, be more irritable, and have feelings of sadness. This is most likely due to changes in hormones after delivery.

The baby blues usually peak 3-5 days after delivery and end by about the 10th day after your baby’s birth. If your symptoms do not go away or if they get worse, you may be experiencing postpartum depression. Make sure you talk to your health care provider.

Vaginal bleeding and discharge

After you give birth you will have vaginal bleeding and discharge. This is called lochia. After your baby is born, your body gets rid of the blood and tissue that was inside of the uterus. For the first four or five days, it’s heavy, bright red and will probably contain blood clots.

Over time, the amount of blood lessens and the color changes from bright red to pink to brown to yellow. It is normal to have discharge for up to 6 weeks after birth. You’ll experience this discharge even if you had a C-section. Use sanitary pads (not tampons) until the discharge stops.

Weight loss

You may be surprised (and disappointed) to learn that the weight you gained during pregnancy doesn’t magically disappear at birth. It takes a while for your uterus to shrink down after it expanded to accommodate your baby. So you may still look pregnant after you give birth. This is completely normal.

With your provider’s OK, you can start light exercises as soon as you feel up to it. Be patient and take things slowly. It can take several months or longer to get back to your pre-pregnancy weight. Walking is a great activity for new moms. You’ll also want to make sure you’re eating healthy foods and drinking lots of water. Both of these things will make you feel better overall and help your postpartum recovery.

Getting pregnant again

It is possible to conceive during the postpartum period. If you are not breastfeeding, your period may return 6-8 weeks after giving birth. If you are breastfeeding, it may take longer.

You may ovulate (release an egg) before you get your period. This means you could get pregnant, whether you’re breastfeeding or not. It’s best to wait at least 18 months between giving birth and getting pregnant again to give your body the time it needs to heal and recover. Getting pregnant again too soon increases your next baby’s chances of being born premature or at a low birthweight. Talk to your provider about when it is best for you to try to get pregnant again.

Complications

While most women are healthy after birth, some do experience complications. You can read about postpartum warning signs here. Trust your instincts—if you feel like something is wrong, call your provider. Most postpartum problems can be easily treated if identified early.

These are just a few of the changes that your body goes through after your baby is born. You can read more on our website.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.