Posts Tagged ‘preemies’

Preemies need vaccines, too

Wednesday, August 31st, 2016

Special thanks to the CDC for sharing this post with us in honor of National Immunization Awareness Month.

NICU babyHaving a premature baby can be stressful, and as a parent of a preemie, you may have many questions about keeping your baby healthy. One of those questions may be about whether or not you should follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) recommended immunization schedule for your baby, or if you need to adjust vaccine timing based on your baby’s early arrival.

The CDC and pediatricians agree that preterm babies, regardless of their birth weight and size, receive most vaccines according to their chronological age (the time since delivery). In fact, vaccinating as early as possible is important, because according to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, preterm babies don’t get as many maternal antibodies through the placenta as full term babies do. This means they are more vulnerable to diseases during their first months of life. The recommended immunization schedule protects against 14 of these diseases, which can be very serious for babies.

Vaccines are safe for preemies, but like any medication, vaccines can cause side effects. The most common side effects are mild (such as redness where the shot was given) and go away within a few days. The side effects associated with vaccines are similar in preterm and full term babies.

There is one exception to following the recommended schedule — the hepatitis B vaccine, which is typically given at birth. This vaccine might not work as well in preterm babies weighing less than 70.5 ounces (2,000 grams). If a baby weighs less than 70.5 ounces and the mother is not infected with hepatitis B, the baby should receive the first hepatitis B dose one month after birth. If the mother is infected or her status is unknown, the baby should receive the vaccine at birth, but it should not be counted as part of the three-dose hepatitis B vaccine series. Then one month after birth, the baby should begin the full three-dose series.

The rotavirus vaccine may also be given differently to preterm babies. Babies usually get the first dose of the vaccine at 8 weeks, although vaccine is licensed for use as early as 6 weeks of age. CDC recommends that if a baby 6 weeks or older has been in the hospital since birth, the rotavirus vaccine should not be given until discharge.

Preemies are vulnerable to diseases and serious infections. Vaccinating according to the recommended schedule is one of the best ways to keep them healthy. For more information, talk to your child’s doctor or visit CDC’s vaccine website for parents.

Have questions? Send them to our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Jaundice in preemies and full term babies

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Preemie incubator- light therapyHave you ever seen a baby in a NICU or hospital nursery wearing only a diaper, lying under bright lights? The baby is receiving light therapy, due to a condition called jaundice.

Jaundice happens when your baby’s liver isn’t working properly or isn’t fully developed. It can happen to babies born prematurely or full term. Often healthy babies have some jaundice soon after birth. When a baby has jaundice, a yellowish color usually first appears on his face. It then may spread to his chest, belly, arms, legs and white parts of his eyes.

What exactly is jaundice?

Jaundice is the build-up of bilirubin in the blood. Bilirubin is a yellowish substance that is formed when red blood cells break down – a natural process in our bodies. It is the liver’s job to break down the bilirubin so it can be excreted from the body. But if the liver is not working properly, it will not be able to remove the bilirubin, which then causes jaundice.

Is it common?

Newborn babies often get jaundice – in fact, about 60% of full-term babies get it. It can take a few days for a baby’s liver to become fully functional and do its job of getting rid of bilirubin. Usually, it is mild and goes away with treatment.

About 80% of preemies develop jaundice within a few days of birth. Babies born prematurely, before 37 weeks of pregnancy, are more likely than full term babies to develop jaundice because their livers aren’t fully developed or functional yet. It can take a week or more for a preemie’s liver to become fully functional. Usually, with treatment, most babies are fine. In rare cases, very high bilirubin levels can cause brain damage, so this is why treatment is usually started early.

A more severe form of jaundice can be caused by other factors such as Rh disease, liver problems, an infection or a genetic condition.

Treatments for jaundice

Phototherapy is a very safe treatment where bright lights called bililights are placed over your baby’s incubator. Your baby’s eyes are protected with eye shields. The lights help to reduce the amount of bilirubin in your baby’s blood.

If your baby does not respond to the bililights, he may need additional treatment such as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) where your baby gets immunoglobulin (a blood protein) placed directly into his vein. Finally, another treatment includes receiving a blood exchange (which replaces your baby’s blood with fresh blood in small amounts), but this is hardly ever necessary because phototherapy and IVIg have such good results.

Know what to look for

Jaundice can occur even once your baby is home from the hospital. The best way to see jaundice is in good light, like in daylight or under fluorescent lights. Jaundice can be harder to see in babies with darker skin.

Call your baby’s health care provider right away if your baby:

  • Looks yellow, orange or greenish-yellow
  • Is hard to wake up or won’t sleep at all
  • Has trouble breastfeeding or sucking from a bottle
  • Is very fussy
  • Has too few wet or dirty diapers

Go straight to the hospital or call 911 if your baby:

  • Won’t stop crying or has a high pitched cry
  • Arches backward
  • Has a still, limp or floppy body
  • Has strange eye movements

Bottom line

The good news is that jaundice is usually nothing to worry about. So try to relax as your baby takes a bath under the lights, knowing this is temporary. See our article for more detailed info.

Did your baby need phototherapy? How did it go? Please share your story.

Got questions?  Text or email them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We’re here to help.

 

Pneumonia and preemies

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016

BabyOnChest-Pneumonia is an infection in the lung(s) which can make it hard to breathe. Premature infants are more prone to developing infections due to their immature immune systems. They were born before they could acquire their mother’s antibodies to fight off infection, which are usually transferred in the third trimester. In addition, due to prematurity, their lungs are not fully formed, making it easier to develop infections such as pneumonia.

Causes and treatments

Pneumonia can have different causes: viral, bacterial or even fungal. It can be hard for doctors to diagnose pneumonia, as it can look like other common preemie disorders, (eg. Respiratory Distress Syndrome). In addition, it may take some time for blood, urine or other lab tests to confirm the diagnosis. Therefore, as soon as pneumonia is suspected, most babies will receive an antibiotic that can fight a broad spectrum of bacteria to help combat the infection. Once the tests confirm the type of infection, the medication may be altered.

Your baby may also receive oxygen to help him breathe easier, or he may be placed on a ventilator. Keeping your baby well hydrated and nourished are also top priorities – his body needs nutrients to fight the infection. With all of this treatment, your baby’s lungs can begin to repair themselves.

Can pneumonia be prevented?

A premature baby may develop different infections for the reasons noted above. But the spread of infections can be avoided through the use of proper hygiene. Visitors who come to the NICU should be free from illness (colds, sore throats, coughs). All visitors should wash hands thoroughly or use foam disinfectant before seeing or touching your baby.

Some infections can spread through the air. Having visitors wear a face mask that covers the nose and mouth can provide an added layer of protection for your baby. NICU staff follows strict protocols regarding hand washing and keeping equipment squeaky clean. They are aware of how to prevent the spread of germs.

The good news

Most babies respond well to medications and recover without lasting issues.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org

The A’s and B’s of the NICU

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

help-breathingApnea (A) and bradycardia (B) are two conditions that are monitored in the NICU. Apnea refers to an interruption in your baby’s breathing, while bradycardia is the slowing of your baby’s heart rate.

Babies in the NICU are constantly monitored for these “A’s and B’s.”

Premature babies often have breathing problems because they were born before their lungs were fully developed. As many as 80 percent of babies born before 30 weeks of pregnancy have apnea. Full-term babies may have breathing problems due to birth defects, infections or complications from labor and delivery.

When is irregular breathing considered apnea?

Often, preemies do not breathe regularly. Your baby may take a long breath, a short one, and then pause for 5-10 seconds before breathing regularly. This is not considered harmful and your baby should outgrow it. But, if a preemie or sick baby stops breathing for 15 – 20 seconds or longer, or if the pause in breathing happens along with a slower heart rate (bradycardia) or a change in your baby’s color, then it is called apnea.

A premature baby’s heart beats much than faster yours. Bradycardia is defined as “the slowing of a baby’s heart rate from its usual range of 120 to 160 beats per minute to a rate of fewer than 100 beats per minute” according to the authors of the Preemies book.

The sensors on your baby’s chest are connected to a machine which will start beeping if your baby stops breathing. The nurse will check your baby and determine if she needs to be stimulated to help her start breathing again. To resume breathing, the nurse may gently touch your baby.

If necessary, your baby’s neonatologist may give your baby medication or place her on a C-PAP machine to help deliver air to your baby’s lungs. In C-PAP (continuous positive airway pressure), air is delivered to your baby’s lungs either through small tubes in her nose or through a tube that has been inserted into her windpipe. The tubes are attached to a machine, which helps your baby breathe. With C-PAP, your baby breathes on her own, but the steady flow of air coming in through the tubes keeps enough pressure in her lungs to prevent the air sacs from collapsing after each breath. It’s a little extra support to help her lungs work better.

Machines can be scary

Seeing your baby hooked up to machines can be scary, and when those machines start to beep, it can be nerve wracking. But, the way your baby looks is a very important indicator of how she is doing. For example, some experts recommend that when machines start beeping, take a look at your baby, not at the machine. Is your baby pink? Is her chest moving in and out? Are her nostrils slightly widening with each breath? If so, she is breathing and getting oxygen.

In addition, the machines are set up to start beeping with plenty of time for the nurse to attend to your baby, before your baby is in distress.

If your baby’s apnea is not resolving, the medical team will consider whether there is something else going on, such as an infection or other problem. As difficult as it is to see your baby struggle with breathing, it may be very comforting to know that apnea usually resolves without any problems.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We are here to help.

Did your baby experience apnea? Did it resolve on its own?

 

Getting guilt-free time off

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016

nine o'clockFew parents can afford the kind of support or home care that would truly provide the respite you need to recharge your batteries. Therefore, you need to be creative in trying to build in snippets of time off.

Parenting a preemie, a child with a birth defect, developmental delay or disability is all-consuming. The physical and emotional toll it takes on a parent can be so heavy that you may wonder how you will go on if you don’t get a break.

Here is what used to work for me:

I decided that every Wednesday was my day off. On that day, I would not make a bed, empty the dishwasher, do laundry (unless absolutely necessary), book doctor or therapy appointments, or otherwise do anything that I usually did on the other six days of the week. Returning non-emergency, non-important emails or phone calls could wait until the next day. After all, I was “off duty” – the usual daily chores could wait. I did not feel guilty that beds were unkempt, because after all, I was off duty. I did not care that if someone rang my doorbell, the house was not tidy because (you guessed it) I was off duty. Dinner was simple – leftovers or take out, on paper plates please! It was my day off so I didn’t have to cook or do dishes. All I had to do that day was take care of my children and myself, which was enough. Wednesday was the day I gave myself a free pass.

It may sound silly or overly simple, but it worked for me. I looked forward to that day in the middle of the week when I didn’t have to do all the things that I usually did on the other days of the week. It was a little way for me to give myself a reprieve without feeling guilty. After all, with most jobs, you get time off to recharge your batteries and become refreshed. Parents raising kids with special healthcare needs must have “time off,” too, even if they can’t physically get away.

Here is another approach I used when my kids got a bit older. I would tell them that at 9 pm I “turn into a pumpkin” (a la Cinderella). That meant they had to have homework done, backpacks packed, and questions asked because I was about to go into my room to unwind (usually by watching a TV show). I can still hear them telling each other “We better show mom this (whatever it was) fast because it is almost pumpkin time!” It was a way for me to know that my day had an end (sort of), and a way for them to respect that Mom needed time to relax. It was amazing how quickly everyone got used to the routine. I even got a night shirt with the words “OFF DUTY” on the front! (A little extra emphasis can be a good thing…haha!) The bottom line is that this method worked well for my family, and especially for me.

Let’s face it, your kids need you, and they need you to be fully functional. If you can’t get someone to help give you a break, maybe my little day-off scenario and “pumpkin” deadline will work for you.

If you have a method of how you get re-charged, please share.

 

Note: The mini-series on Delays and Disabilities has lots of info to help you if you have a child with special needs. Please feel free to comment and make suggestions. If you have questions, send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

RDS and BPD – breathing problems in preemies

Wednesday, October 28th, 2015

NICU sign 1If your baby was born prematurely, you are probably concerned about his lungs. A baby’s lungs are not considered to be fully functional until around 35 weeks of pregnancy. If your baby was born before that, it is possible that he may struggle with breathing.

 

RDS

A serious breathing problem called respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most common illness in the NICU. But, the good news is that due to medical advances, babies with RDS have a 99% survival rate.

Babies with RDS struggle to breathe because their immature lungs do not produce enough surfactant, a protein that keeps small air sacs in the lungs from collapsing. March of Dimes grantees helped develop surfactant therapy, which was introduced in 1990. Since then, deaths from RDS have been reduced by half.

Babies with RDS also may receive a treatment called C-PAP (continuous positive airway pressure). The air may be delivered through small tubes in the baby’s nose, or through a tube that has been inserted into his windpipe. As with surfactant treatment, C-PAP helps keep small air sacs from collapsing. C-PAP helps your baby breathe, but does not breathe for him. The sickest babies may temporarily need the help of a mechanical ventilator to breathe for them while their lungs recover. Learn more about the differences between C-PAP and a ventilator, as well as causes, symptoms and treatment of RDS.

BPD

BPD (bronchopulmonary dysplasia) is a chronic lung disease common in preemies who have been treated for RDS. These babies may develop fluid in the lungs, scarring and lung damage. Medications can help make breathing easier for them. Usually babies with BPD improve by age 2 but others may develop a chronic lung condition similar to asthma. Learn about asthma, including questions to ask your child’s health care provider and how to help your child understand his breathing problems.

Even though the outlook for babies born prematurely has improved greatly, many babies still face serious complications and lasting disabilities. Many March of Dimes grantees seek new ways to improve the care of these tiny babies, while others strive to prevent premature delivery.

Have questions?  Email or text AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We are here to help.

 

Your NICU healthcare team

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015

NICU doctor and baby resizedAt times, it may seem that there is a constant flow of different people caring for your baby in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).  A team of professionals work together to give your baby every possible chance of achieving good health.

Some or all of these people may be part of the NICU team at your hospital:

chaplain – A person who provides spiritual support to NICU families.

charge nurse – A health care provider who has nursing training. The charge nurse makes sure that the NICU runs well. This nurse also oversees admitting babies to and discharging them from the NICU.

clinical nurse specialist – Also called CNS. A health care provider who has special nursing training in the care of children and their families. The CNS helps parents deal with their baby’s stay in the NICU. The CNS provides support and teaches parents about their baby’s health condition. The CNS is also involved in nursing staff education.

family support specialist – A person who provides information, help and comfort to families when their baby is in the NICU.

lactation consultant – A person who has special training to help women breastfeed.

medical geneticist – A doctor who has special training in diseases that are inherited and other birth defects.

neonatal nurse practitioner – Also called NNP. A health care provider who has special nursing and medical training in caring for sick babies. The NNP works with the baby’s neonatologist and other medical team members. The NNP can perform medical procedures and care for babies.

neonatal physician assistant – Also called PA. A health care provider who has special medical training in working with sick newborns. The PA works with the neonatologist, performs medical procedures and may direct your baby’s care.

neonatologist – A pediatrician (children’s doctor) who has years of additional medical training in the care of sick newborns.

neonatology fellow – A fully trained pediatrician who is getting additional medical training in the care of sick newborns.

occupational therapist – Also called OT. A health care provider who helps figure out how well babies feed and swallow and how well they move their arms and legs.

ophthalmologist – A doctor who has special medical training in the care of eyes and vision.

patient care assistant – Also called PCA. A NICU staff member who helps nurses change bed sheets, feed babies and prepare bottles.

pediatric cardiologist – A doctor who has special medical training in the care of a baby’s or child’s heart.

pediatric gastroenterologist – A doctor who has special medical training in the care of a baby’s or child’s digestive system. The digestive system is made up of organs and tubes that digest (break down) the food a baby eats.

pediatric neurologist – A doctor who has special medical training in the care of a baby’s or child’s brain and spinal cord. A spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that carries signals between the brain and the body.

pediatric pulmonologist – A doctor who has special medical training in the care of a baby’s or child’s lungs.

pediatric resident – A doctor who is getting medical training in taking care of babies and children.

pediatrician – A doctor who has special training in taking care of babies and children.

pharmacist – A person who has special training in how medicines work and the side effects they may cause. People get prescription medicine from a pharmacist. Pharmacists also provide medicines in the hospital and may visit patients with the NICU team.

physical therapist – Also called PT. A health care provider who looks at any movement problems babies have and how they may affect developmental milestones such as sitting, rolling over or walking. The PT helps a baby improve muscle strength and coordination.

registered dietitian – Also called RD. A health care provider who is trained as an expert in nutrition. The RD works with the NICU doctors and nurses to help make sure babies get all the nutrients they need. Nutrients, like vitamins and minerals, help the body stay healthy.

registered nurse – Also called RN. A health care provider who has nursing training. An RN in the NICU has special training in caring for sick newborns.

respiratory therapist — Also called RT. A health care provider who cares for babies with breathing problems. An RT is trained to use medical equipment needed to care for babies.

social worker – A person who is trained to help families cope with their baby’s NICU stay. The social worker can help families get information from health care providers about their baby’s medical conditions, give emotional support, help families work with medical insurance companies, and help plan for when their baby comes home.

speech and language therapist – A health care provider who has training to help people with speech and language problems. In the NICU, this therapist often helps newborns with feeding problems.

surgeon – A doctor who has additional specialized medical training in performing surgery and other procedures.

technician – A member of the hospital staff who may draw blood or take X-rays (a test that uses small amounts of radiation to take pictures of inside the body).

At one point or another, you may encounter many of the above people while your baby is in the NICU. They all work together to provide continuous care for your baby. Learn more about pediatric specialties and how they may help your baby.

Remember – you are also an important member of the NICU team, too. Don’t ever hesitate to ask questions or speak up for your baby.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

The survival rates of extremely premature babies are improving

Friday, September 11th, 2015

NICU preemieAdvances in treatment options may be helping to increase survival rates and reduce the number of complications for extremely premature babies, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study looked at 34,636 infants born between 22-28 weeks over 20 years (1993-2012). The researchers found that the overall rate of survival for premature babies born between 22-28 weeks increased from 70% in 1993 to 79% in 2012.

According to the researchers, “Survival rates remained unchanged from1993 through 2008. After 2008, trends in survival varied by gestational age.”

  • For babies born at 23-weeks, the survival rate rose from 27% in 2009 to 33% in 2012.
  • For babies born at 24-weeks, the survival rate rose from 63% in 2009 to 65% in 2012.
  • There were smaller increases for babies born at 25 weeks and 27 weeks.
  • There was, however, no change reported for babies born at 22, 26, and 28 weeks.

The researchers also looked at how many babies survived extreme premature birth without developing major neonatal health problems. They found that the rate of survival without major complications increased approximately 2% per year for babies born between 25-28 weeks.  However, there was no change in survival without major complications for babies born between 22 to 24 weeks.

The authors of the study also observed changes in maternal and infant care which may have contributed to the increased survival rates. For instance, the use of corticosteroids prior to birth rose to 87% in 2012 (vs. 24% in 1993). Corticosteroids help to speed up your baby’s lung development. While most babies were put on a ventilator (a breathing machine that delivers warmed and humidified air to a baby’s lungs), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) without ventilation increased from 7% in 2002 to 11% in 2012. And the rate of late-onset infection decreased for all gestational ages.

“For parents of babies born very early — 22-28 weeks — these data are showing improvements in outcome. We are gratified by the progress, but there is so much more that could be done if we could understand what causes premature labor and birth,” said Dr. Edward McCabe, Chief Medical Officer for The March of Dimes.

“Our focus is on preventing premature births and we are making excellent progress,” he said. “We have saved hundreds of thousands of babies from premature birth since the rate peaked in 2006.”

You can read more about our Prematurity Campaign and our Prematurity Research Centers on our website.

Questions? Email or text us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Brain bleeds in premature babies

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

brainThe younger, smaller and sicker a baby is at birth, the more likely he is to have a brain bleed, also called an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). If you or someone you know has a baby with a brain bleed, it can be a very scary and upsetting experience.

Bleeding in the brain is most common in the smallest of babies born prematurely (weighing less than 3 1/3 pounds). A baby born before 32 weeks of pregnancy is at the highest risk of developing a brain bleed. The tiny blood vessels in a baby’s brain are very fragile and can be injured easily. The bleeds usually occur in the first few days of life.

How are brain bleeds diagnosed?

Bleeding generally occurs near the fluid-filled spaces (ventricles) in the center of the brain. An ultrasound examination can show whether a baby has a brain bleed and how severe it is. According to MedlinePlus.gov, “all babies born before 30 weeks should have an ultrasound of the head to screen for IVH. The test is done once between 7 and 14 days of age. Babies born between 30-34 weeks may also have ultrasound screening if they have symptoms of the problem.”

Are all brain bleeds the same?

Brain bleeds usually are given a number grade (1 to 4) according to their location and size. The right and left sides of the brain are graded separately. Most brain bleeds are mild (grades 1 and 2) and resolve themselves with few lasting problems. More severe bleeds (grade 3 and 4) can cause difficulties for your baby during hospitalization as well as possible problems in the future.

What happens after your baby leaves the hospital?

Every child is unique. How well your baby will do depends on several factors. Many babies will need close monitoring by a pediatric neurologist or other specialist (such as a developmental behavioral pediatrician) during infancy and early childhood. Some children may have seizures or problems with speech, movement or learning.

If your baby is delayed in meeting his developmental milestones, he may benefit from early intervention services (EI). EI services such as speech, occupational and physical therapy may help your child make strides. Read this series to learn how to access services in your state.

Where can parents find support?

Having a baby with a brain bleed can be overwhelming. The March of Dimes online community, Share Your Story, is a place where parents can find comfort and support from other parents who have (or had) a baby in the NICU with a brain bleed. Just log on and post a comment and you will be welcomed.

You can also leave a comment here on our blog, or send a question to AskUs@marchofdimes.org where a health education specialist is ready to assist you.

 

Preemies and asthma – how to help your child

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

asthma inhalerResearch has shown that premature birth (before 37 weeks) can cause a baby to have lung and breathing problems such as asthma, a health condition that affects the airways.

Asthma causes repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and nighttime or early morning coughing. It can be mild to severe. If your child has asthma, he is far from alone. According to the CDC, 6.8 million children have asthma, or 1 in 11 children.

Asthma can be controlled by taking medicine and avoiding the triggers that can cause a flare-up. It is important to remove the triggers in your child’s environment that can make asthma worse.

What causes asthma symptoms?

Many children with asthma have allergies. Coming into contact with an allergen can set off asthma symptoms. Common allergens are: dust mites, animal dander, mold and pollen.

Other triggers include air pollution, smoke, exercise and infections in the airways. Asthma symptoms may be brought on by a change in air temperature, perfumes and odors from cleaning products.

How can you help your child?

Understand your child’s asthma condition as much as possible. Learn how to minimize triggers and know what to do in the event of an asthma flare-up. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers ways to avoid asthma triggers or irritants.

What are common treatments?

Depending on how mild or severe your child’s asthma condition is, treatments will vary. Often quick relief medicines (such as inhalers) will be prescribed to help stop an asthma flare-up. These medicines help to open the airways making breathing easier.

Long term treatments include medications that aim to keep the lungs from becoming inflamed. These medications help prevent flare-ups, and need to be taken even when there are no asthma symptoms.

What about childcare and school?

The AAP has helpful info on the various treatments available and offers management tips for different situations such as at home or school.

The CDC has recommendations on how you can make your child’s childcare or school environment as successful and asthma free as possible. In the United States, there are laws to help your child at school. For example, a 504 plan might be needed to help your child access his education through reasonable accommodations.

What should you ask your child’s health care provider?

Ask for an individualized asthma action plan. This is a written plan to help your child avoid his particular triggers and respond to asthma symptoms. The plan aims to give you more control of your child’s condition, and hopefully, to avoid emergency situations. The plan can be used anywhere – at home, day care or school.

How can your child understand his asthma?

There are books, videos and podcasts available that you can explore with your child to help him learn about his condition (if he is old enough to understand):
How to use your asthma inhaler video shows kids using an inhaler properly.
Dusty the asthma goldfish and his asthma triggers is a downloadable fun book that helps kids and parents understand triggers.
• The CDC’s Kiddtastics podcast is another way for parents and kids to learn about managing symptoms.
• Here are other resources specifically geared towards kids. Check them out.

Bottom line

No two children are alike, and each asthma case is unique. As with any health condition, be sure to speak with your child’s health care provider about all of your concerns. With knowledge, medical advice and an action plan, your child can live a very full and active life.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Read more about how to help your child with a delay, disability or health condition.