Posts Tagged ‘sore nipples’

Breastfeeding: Common discomforts and what to do about them

Thursday, August 2nd, 2018

Breast milk is the best food for your baby. Breast milk gives your baby important nutrients that help him grow healthy and strong. Do not feel discouraged if you have some discomforts when you first start breastfeeding. Many new moms have difficulties. However, with the right support and information, you will be able to breastfeed your baby.

Here are some common problems moms may have and what you can do about them:

“My baby won’t latch-on.”

When your baby’s latched on, her mouth is securely attached to your nipple for breastfeeding. To help your baby latch on, first, find a comfortable place to breastfeed your baby. It could be in a chair, on the couch or on your bed. Remove your clothes from the waist up and have your baby wear only his diaper. Lay your baby between your breasts so that your tummies are touching. Skin-to-skin contact is the best way to help your baby get comfortable and ready to latch-on. Here’s how to make sure your baby gets a good latch:

  • When your baby opens his mouth, bring him to your breast. Bring him to you — don’t lean into him.
  • Hold your baby close. Both his nose and chin should touch your breast. Don’t worry — he can breathe and eat at the same time. Your baby should have a good mouthful of your areola (the area around your nipple).
  • When your baby has a good latch, you will feel his tongue pull your breast deep into his mouth. If you feel his tongue at the tip of your nipple, it’s not a good latch.

“My nipples hurt.”

Many women feel nipple pain when they first start breastfeeding. If your nipples are cracked and sore, you may need to change the position you use to breastfeed. If you have nipple pain:

  • Make sure your baby is fully latched on. If she’s not latched on, remove her from your breast and try again.
  • After feeding, put some fresh breast milk on your nipples. Just like breast milk is good for your baby, it can help you too. Creams also may help. Ask your provider which kind to use.
  • Talk to your provider or lactation consultant if the pain doesn’t go away.

“My breast is swollen and feels hard.”

Your breasts swell as they fill up with milk. They may feel tender and sore. Most of the time the discomfort goes away once you start breastfeeding regularly. Here are some ways to help feel better:

  • Try not to miss or go a long time between feedings. Don’t skip night feedings.
  • Express a small amount of milk with a breast pump or by hand before breastfeeding.
  • Take a warm shower or put warm towels on your breasts. If your breasts hurt, put cold packs on them.
  • If your breasts stay swollen, tell your provider.

With patience and practice, you and your baby can be great at breastfeeding! Give yourself time to learn this new skill and trust yourself. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. You may just need a little extra support to get started. Your health care provider, a lactation consultant, a breastfeeding peer counselor or a breastfeeding support group can help you. Find out more about how to get help with breastfeeding by visiting marchofdimes.org.

Breastfeeding counseling, breast pumps, and supplies are services covered by most health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act, at no extra cost to you. Learn more about recommended preventive services that are covered under the Affordable Care Act at Care Women Deserve.

 

Breastfeeding myths debunked – part 2

Monday, June 23rd, 2014

mom breastfeeding1. Your baby needs water too.

False: Supplementing with water is not recommended for babies. Breast milk or formula contains all the water a baby needs and will keep your baby hydrated even in hot, dry climates.

2. You don’t produce enough milk.

Often False: The amount of milk you produce depends on a number of factors, including how often you feed and how your baby sucks at the breast. You can check if your baby is getting enough to eat by the amount of wet or soiled diapers in a day. The American Academy of Pediatrics tells moms to “expect 3-5 urines and 3-4 stools per day by 3-5 days of age; 4-6 urines and 3-6 stools per 5-7 days of age.” Your baby’s health care provider will check if your baby is gaining weight at his well-baby visits.

3. Breastfeeding is easy

False: Breastfeeding can be very challenging. Many moms face sore, cracked and bleeding nipples. It can hurt when you try to feed your baby. It’s important that when you start to feel pain or discomfort you seek help from a lactation counselor or support group. Many times the soreness can be relieved if the latch or position is changed. Some moms are able to breastfeed right away and others experience discomfort for months. Breastfeeding is learning a new skill; it takes lots of practice, time and patience.

4. Breastfeeding reduces the risk of SIDS

True: Breastfeeding can reduce the risks associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Feed your baby only breast milk for at least 6 months. Continue breastfeeding your baby until at least her first birthday. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says “Breastfeed as much and as long as you can. Studies show that breastfeeding your baby can help reduce the risk of SIDS.”

5. My baby should always breastfeed from both breasts

Not always true: Babies, especially newborns may have periods of preferring only one breast. Your baby may cry, become fussy or refuse to feed on one breast. If your baby is getting enough milk and you are not having any other trouble, it is fine for your baby to feed from only one breast. If you are having problems with your milk supply, or experience engorgement or pain, there are tips to get your baby back on both breasts.  For example try starting your baby on the preferred breast, and then slide him over to other side without changing the position of his body. To learn more, ask a lactation specialist.

Did you have an assumption about breastfeeding that was false? Or did someone give you advice that helped? We’d love to hear from you.

Check out the first 5 breastfeeding myths from last week.

Breastfeeding myths debunked

Monday, June 9th, 2014

woman breastfeedingWhether you are currently breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed in the future, there are many myths that could lead you toward or away from breastfeeding.

1. Breastfeeding will ruin my breasts.

False: breastfeeding does not affect the shape of your breasts. Your breasts may become engorged while breastfeeding, but your breasts will return to their usual shape once you have weaned feedings. Aging and gravity are the culprits of changing breast shape!

2. Breastfeeding will make my nipples sore.

True and False: Breastfeeding may make your nipples sore, but there are things you can do to prevent or solve the soreness. Sore nipples may happen when the baby is not latched on properly. You can seek help and support from a lactation counselor or support group.

3. Breastfeeding may help you lose your baby weight.

True! Breastfeeding burns extra calories (up to 500 a day), helping you return to your pre-pregnancy weight in a gradual and healthy way.  Remember pregnancy weight was not gained overnight so it will not disappear quickly. It is important to maintain a healthy diet and to wait until you feel ready and for your health care provider’s OK to purposely lose weight.

4. You must drink milk to make milk.

False: You do not need to drink milk to make milk. However it is important for you to maintain a healthy diet of vegetables, fruits, grains, proteins and water. These are the only nutrients you need to produce milk. If you are concerned about getting enough calcium, you can drink milk or eat non-dairy foods that contain calcium such as dark green vegetables or nuts.

5. My milk isn’t good enough.

False: Breast is still best. Breast milk composition changes within the feeding, within the day and over the course of lactation, but breast milk has higher amounts of nutrients than other foods or supplements, including formula. Your breast milk can help protect your baby from things like diarrhea and infections, and help brain development.

These are the first 5 myths debunked. Stay tuned next week for more.

Did you have an assumption about breastfeeding that was false? Or did someone give you advice that helped? We’d love to hear from you.