Posts Tagged ‘swelling during pregnancy’

National Preeclampsia Awareness Month

Monday, May 20th, 2013

The US Department of Health and Human Services has designated May 2013 as the first National Preeclampsia Awareness Month. Throughout the month, several organizations educate about preeclampsia, a serious and common complication of pregnancy and the postpartum period. This condition is dangerous to both the mother and her unborn baby. Preeclampsia is characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine, and can also include signs and symptoms such as swelling, headaches and visual disturbances. It’s so important for pregnant women to keep all their prenatal appointments and to alert their health care providers if they have any of the symptoms.

The Preeclampsia Foundation has launched a month-long campaign of education including infographics, Twitter chats, blogs and more. Learn as much as you can to help keep yourself and your baby as healthy as possible.

Salt intake during pregnancy

Thursday, April 19th, 2012

salt1Some of my friends love cake, cookies and all kinds of sweets. Not me – I’m a crunchy salty kind of gal. Wave a pretzel, chip or popcorn under my nose and I’m in munch trouble. When I was pregnant, I was told to cut out most salt from my diet, but that’s not necessarily what I’d hear today.

Health care providers used to recommend limiting your salt intake during pregnancy because they thought it added to the swelling that occurs in most pregnant women. Today, however, most experts believe that a certain increase in body fluids is important and normal during pregnancy and that a mild amount of salt in your diet is actually beneficial because it can help maintain adequate fluid levels.

Extra fluid in your body helps prepare you for pregnancy and delivery. It allows your tissues to handle the growth of your baby.  It also prepares your pelvic area for labor and delivery. Much of the weight you gain during pregnancy is from extra fluids, which your body usually gets rid of in the days after delivery.

Some things are important to avoid during pregnancy (raw fish, soft cheeses, alcohol), but a normal salt intake seems to be something most pregnant women don’t need to worry about. Mind you, this is not a license to eat a bag of pretzels every night!

Important note: Call your health care provider if you have severe or sudden swelling, particularly in your hands or in your face around the eyes. This could be a sign of a serious condition called preeclampsia (also called toxemia) that causes high blood pressure and excess fluid retention. If your blood pressure is rising, you may be told to do a number of things, including dialing back the salt.

The pain of preeclampsia

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

May is Preeclampsia Awareness Month. Our guest post today is a personal story from Meredith Drews of the Preeclampsia Foundation.

I am the mother of four—but I only get to kiss two of my children goodnight.  I have two boys, Thomas and Henry, and two daughters, Bridget and Elsie.  Thomas is five, plays t-ball, gymnastics and thinks Justin Beiber is cool.  Henry is two, adores his big brother, loves Mickey Mouse and is talking like crazy.  Bridget and Elsie died an hour after they were both born. They should be three years old.

It was my second pregnancy and we were shocked with spontaneous twins.  Once the surprise wore off, we adjusted to the idea and to the never-ending question: “Do twins run in your family?”
 
My twenty week ultrasound came and went… in this time we’d learned the twins were both girls; we’d just picked out names, the excitement was building, the reality settling in.  Two weeks or so after my “grand” ultrasound I went back to my OB for a check-up.  We did growth checks at each appointment and the girls’ heads had grown in two weeks, but not their stomachs.  My doctor was concerned and sent me home on bedrest for two weeks. I never made it that far.

A little more than a week later I called my doctor at 5 am in the morning.  I asked to come in and she said absolutely. I wasn’t swelling.  I thought maybe I had “floaters” in my eyes.  My urine was dark. I had bruising on my legs.  I’d had a nose bleed a few days earlier that I had trouble stopping.  There was no pain under my right ribcage, but I had had a pain in my right shoulder for nearly a week.

I knew preeclampsia could be a concern because of the visual disturbances.  My blood pressure was higher. I was spilling protein in my urine. My doctor sent me to the hospital, where things went from bad to horrific.  I was told I would be in the hospital at least a week. Then my doctor and MFM delivered the bad news: I had preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome (which I had NEVER heard of).  I needed to deliver right away.  If we chose to deliver cesarean, it would give the girls the best shot, but be very risky to me (with low platelets I could bleed to death), or, I could deliver vaginally and not attempt to save my daughters.

I had to call my husband over the phone with this news and we agreed the best thing to do would be to deliver vaginally, not risk all three of us and leave behind our son without his mother.  Every kick I felt inside me was gut-wrenching, knowing these little babies I’d tried so hard to keep safe were dying.  Unable to have an epidural, I felt every push of labor, heard all the crying in the room from doctors and nurses and my husband.  We heard a deafening silence from our baby girls.

We held our daughters in our arms as they died.

I couldn’t believe this had happened to me.  I still can’t.  I recovered in the hospital another five days and went home to my computer, searching for information and found the Preeclampsia Foundation.  I found information and support which helped me stay informed through my third pregnancy, just three months after we lost our girls.  In time, I have found a place and means to give meaning to my daughters’ one hour of life through the volunteer work I do.
 
I will never understand why this had to happen, but I someday hope to know what happened to cause my body to betray me like that.  I want to know how it happened and how others can prevent it.  Really… I want my baby girls back… but I’m very blessed to have my own health and my sweet, perfect two little boys—both born completely preeclampsia-free.

You can join us for a live chat about preeclampsia on May 11th at 2 PM EST. You’ll find us, and our guests from the Preeclampsia Foundation, on Twitter at #pregnancychat.