Posts Tagged ‘ventilator’

What if my baby needs surgery?

Friday, November 11th, 2016

mom-and-preemieThe idea of surgery is scary for anyone. But learning your premature baby needs to have surgery can be terrifying. Learning what you can expect may make things a little easier. The following information is adapted from Preemies: The Essential Guide for Parents of Premature Babies.

Ask a lot of questions

  • Talk to your baby’s neonatologist, the surgeon who will be operating, the anesthesiologist, and any other specialists who may be involved in your baby’s care.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask ANY questions that you have. It may be helpful to write them down as you think of them so that you don’t forget to ask when you see your baby’s doctors.  You may meet with someone unexpectedly and you will not want to miss the opportunity to get answers to your questions. Perhaps keep a notebook or pad in your handbag so you can jot down your thoughts as they cross your mind.
  • Also, take advantage of talking to the NICU nurses. They have cared for many preemies and understand your fears and concerns and can give you an idea of what is going to happen.

Surgery

  • Most premature babies are put under general anesthesia for surgery. This means that your baby will not be able to move during the surgery. She will not feel any pain or have any memory of the procedure.
  • If general anesthesia is used, your baby will not be able to breathe on her own and will need to be on a ventilator.
  • The surgical team will be monitoring your baby to make sure she is as comfortable as possible. During the surgery, your baby will be kept warm. The room temperature will be raised and she will be covered as much as possible. IV fluids may be warmed as well.

Recovery

  • Preemies need very special care after surgery. Immediately after surgery, your baby will remain in a recovery area while the anesthesia wears off.
  • The surgical team will then accompany your baby back to the NICU and update the neonatologists and bedside nurses.
  • It will take some time for the anesthesia to leave your baby’s body. This means she may be on a ventilator to help her breathe. If your baby didn’t have a breathing problem before surgery, she may be removed from the ventilator within hours or up to a few days after surgery. Babies who did have breathing problems will most likely need to be on a ventilator for a longer period of time.
  • Pain can delay healing and recovery, so your baby’s NICU team will be watching carefully for any signs that she is uncomfortable. The medication your baby receives to manage pain depends on a number of factors. Make sure you ask the doctors and nurses if you have concerns.

Asking questions and understanding what to expect before, during, and after your baby’s surgery, can help you feel more confident and better prepared for the procedure. You may also find it helpful to talk to other parents who have been through a similar experience with their preemie. Share Your Story, our online community, will allow you to connect with other moms and dads who can offer advice and support.

And, of course, we are here to answer any questions you may have. Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

 

 

 

RDS and BPD – breathing problems in preemies

Wednesday, October 28th, 2015

NICU sign 1If your baby was born prematurely, you are probably concerned about his lungs. A baby’s lungs are not considered to be fully functional until around 35 weeks of pregnancy. If your baby was born before that, it is possible that he may struggle with breathing.

 

RDS

A serious breathing problem called respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most common illness in the NICU. But, the good news is that due to medical advances, babies with RDS have a 99% survival rate.

Babies with RDS struggle to breathe because their immature lungs do not produce enough surfactant, a protein that keeps small air sacs in the lungs from collapsing. March of Dimes grantees helped develop surfactant therapy, which was introduced in 1990. Since then, deaths from RDS have been reduced by half.

Babies with RDS also may receive a treatment called C-PAP (continuous positive airway pressure). The air may be delivered through small tubes in the baby’s nose, or through a tube that has been inserted into his windpipe. As with surfactant treatment, C-PAP helps keep small air sacs from collapsing. C-PAP helps your baby breathe, but does not breathe for him. The sickest babies may temporarily need the help of a mechanical ventilator to breathe for them while their lungs recover. Learn more about the differences between C-PAP and a ventilator, as well as causes, symptoms and treatment of RDS.

BPD

BPD (bronchopulmonary dysplasia) is a chronic lung disease common in preemies who have been treated for RDS. These babies may develop fluid in the lungs, scarring and lung damage. Medications can help make breathing easier for them. Usually babies with BPD improve by age 2 but others may develop a chronic lung condition similar to asthma. Learn about asthma, including questions to ask your child’s health care provider and how to help your child understand his breathing problems.

Even though the outlook for babies born prematurely has improved greatly, many babies still face serious complications and lasting disabilities. Many March of Dimes grantees seek new ways to improve the care of these tiny babies, while others strive to prevent premature delivery.

Have questions?  Email or text AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We are here to help.

 

In the NICU – How does C-PAP differ from a ventilator?

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

help-breathing2Some premature babies are put on C-PAP to help them breathe. Others are on a ventilator.  What’s the difference?

In C-PAP (continuous positive airway pressure), air is delivered to a baby’s lungs either through small tubes in the baby’s nose or through a tube that has been inserted into her windpipe. The tubes are attached to a machine, which helps the baby breathe but does not breathe for her.  With C-PAP, the baby breathes on her own, but the steady flow of air coming in through the tubes keeps enough pressure in her lungs to prevent the air sacs from collapsing after each breath.  It’s a little extra support to help the lungs do their job.

A mechanical ventilator is a breathing machine that delivers warmed and humidified air to a baby’s lungs. The sickest babies receive mechanical ventilation, meaning that the mechanical ventilator temporarily breathes for them while their lungs recover. The air is delivered to the baby’s lungs through an endotracheal tube (a small plastic tube that is inserted through a baby’s nose or mouth down into the windpipe). The amount of oxygen, air pressure and number of breaths per minute can be regulated to meet each baby’s needs.

For those of you who had a premature baby, was she on C-PAP or a ventilator?  How did you feel when you saw the equipment?

 

Updated October 2015.