Posts Tagged ‘winter season’

Wind chill, hypothermia and frostbite, oh my

Monday, December 8th, 2014

snowstorm1Outdoor activities during this season can help you and your family beat the winter blues. The days are getting colder and the sun is going down earlier, but if you’re busy having fun, you may hardly notice. Last week I talked about keeping you and your baby warm during the winter. But even if you and your little one are bundled, things like wind chill, hypothermia or frostbite can still happen.

Wind Chill

• Wind chill is the temperature your body feels when the air temperature is combined with the wind speed. It is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by the effects of wind and cold. As the speed of the wind increases, it can carry heat away from your body much more quickly, causing skin temperature to drop.
• Always be aware of what the wind temperature is before you or your children go outside. If you are unaware of the wind chill, it could be only a matter of time before frostbite and hypothermia set in.

Frostbite

• Frostbite is when the skin and outer tissues of the body have become frozen. This can happen on fingers, toes, ears and nose. They may appear pale, gray and blistered. Your child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
• Frostbite can happen quickly. The risk is increased in people with reduced blood circulation and among those not dressed properly for extremely cold temperature.
• The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) say a victim is usually unaware of frostbite until someone else points it out because the frozen tissues are numb.
• If frostbite occurs, bring your child inside and place the frostbitten part in warm (not hot) water or apply warm washcloths to the area. Call your child’s health care provider if numbness continues for more than a few minutes.

Hypothermia

• Hypothermia is a medical emergency that occurs when your body loses heat faster than it can produce heat, causing a dangerously low body temperature. This can happen when your child is playing outside in extremely cold weather, if his clothing gets wet or if he is not dressed appropriately for the weather.
• Hypothermia is most likely to occur at very cold temperatures, but it can occur even at cool temperatures (above 40 degrees Fahrenheit) if you become chilled from rain, sweat or submerged in cold water.
• Signs of hypothermia include shivering, becoming lethargic or clumsy and slurring speech. Infants will become bright red, have cold skin and very low energy.
• If you notice any of these signs in your child, contact his health care provider immediately or call 911. Take your child indoors, remove any wet clothing and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes until help arrives.

With a little knowledge and some advance preparation, you and your child will enjoy the cold, winter season without any problems. Click here for more information on how to stay warm and safe this winter.