Posts Tagged ‘#worldbdday’

Why do we have World Birth Defects Day?

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

wbddlogoIn a day and age when many cures exist for diseases and conditions, it may seem hard to believe that birth defects still occur. Yet, unfortunately they do.

Every year, millions of babies around the world are born with a serious birth defect. In many countries, birth defects are one of the leading causes of death in babies and young children. Babies who survive and live with these conditions are at an increased risk for long-term disabilities and other health problems.

What are birth defects?

Birth defects are health conditions that are present at birth. They may change the shape or function of one or more parts of the body. Birth defects can cause problems in overall health, how the body develops, or how the body works.

There are thousands of different birth defects. The most common are heart defects, cleft lip and palate, Down syndrome and spina bifida. Our website has a list of common birth defects as well as examples of rare birth defects.

We don’t know all the reasons why birth defects occur. Some may be caused by the genes you inherit from your parents. Others may be caused by environmental factors, such as exposure to harmful chemicals. Some may be due to a combination of genes and environment. In most cases, the causes are unknown.

Why #WorldBDDay?

The goal of World Birth Defects Day is to expand birth defects surveillance, prevention, care, and research worldwide. Naturally, the goal is to raise awareness, too.

You can help.

  • Lend your voice! Register with your social media account and Thunderclap will post a one-time message on March 3rd. The message will say “Birth defects affect 3-6% of infants worldwide. It’s a major cause of death/disability. Lend your voice!”
  • Join the Buzzday on Twitter, March 3, 2017 by using the hashtag #WorldBDDay.

With your help, we’ll raise awareness, which is the first step in improving the health of all babies.

What we’re doing

The mission of the March of Dimes is to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. Our research grantees have discovered genes that cause or contribute to a number of common birth defects, including fragile X syndrome, cleft lip and palate, and heart defects. These discoveries may one day lead to interventions so that some birth defects can be prevented.

The March of Dimes offers information about how to have a healthy pregnancy on our website and this blog.

We answer health questions from the public through AskUs@marchofdimes.org, and promote messaging on our Twitter handles, @modhealthtalk, @nacersano (in Spanish) and @marchofdimes.

We welcome your comments and questions.

Birth defects research changes lives

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

March of Dimes invests in birth defects research

Sick babyFor many years, March of Dimes grantees have been seeking to identify genes and environmental factors that cause or contribute to birth defects. For example, in 2015, there were 78 million dollars in active birth defects research grants.

Today is World Birth Defects Day

Understanding the causes of birth defects is a crucial first step towards developing effective ways to prevent or treat them. Some birth defects are caused by a mutation (change) in a single gene. In 1991, Stephen Warren, PhD, a March of Dimes grantee at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, identified the gene that causes fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disabilities.

Current grantees are seeking to identify genes that may play a role in other common birth defects, such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Others are working on identifying environmental exposures that can cause birth defects. In fact, did you know that in 1973, March of Dimes grantees were the first to link drinking alcohol during pregnancy to a specific pattern of birth defects and intellectual disabilities now known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders? By understanding the connection between alcohol and birth defects, pregnant moms are now able to have healthier pregnancies.

Many other birth defects appear to be caused by multiple genes and environmental factors, adding to the complexity of understanding their causes. March of Dimes grantees have discovered genes that contribute to heart defects and to cleft lip/palate, both of which are among the most common birth defects.

Please help us raise awareness of this serious global problem and advocate for more, surveillance, prevention, care and research to help babies and children. 

Join us on Twitter #WorldBDDay.

Share your stories and lend your support.

Get ready – tomorrow is World Birth Defects Day

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

baby with cleft lipEvery parent wants a healthy baby. But, the reality is that many babies are born with birth defects.

Some birth defects are clearly seen at birth. Other times it may be weeks, months or even years before the birth defect is discovered. There are thousands of different birth defects. Some are common while others are rare.

Here are a few facts about birth defects

  • Every 4 ½ minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect in the United States. That’s 1 in 33 babies.
  • About half of all birth defects have no known cause. The other half are caused by genetic conditions (such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell disease) or a combination of factors.
  • Some birth defects have decreased in prevalence, such as cleft lip and palate, while others have increased, such as gastroschisis.
  • Birth defects are the leading cause of death in the first year of life. Sadly, babies who survive often face a lifetime of disabilities.
  • Birth defects affect all races and ethnicities.
  • Worldwide, more than 8 million babies are born each year with a serious birth defect.
  • Learn what you can do to prevent certain birth defects.

Here’s what’s new

The PUSH! Global Alliance – People United for Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus –is launching tomorrow for World Birth Defects Day. The mission is to provide a collective global platform for all organizations to work towards research, prevention, care, and improved quality of life for people with spina bifida or hydrocephalus. Check them out at pu-sh.org.

Help us raise awareness

You can observe World Birth Defects Day by participating in social media activities and sharing a story or picture about the impact of birth defects on you and your family.

If you are a health care professional, speak about the steps a woman can take to help lower her risk of having a baby with a birth defect. Lend us your voice! Here’s how:

  • Join the buzzday on Twitter tomorrow, March 3rd – #WorldBDDay
  • Register to be a part of the Thunderclap – a message will be sent out at 9:00 a.m. EST tomorrow to help raise awareness.

The March of Dimes and over 60 other international organizations working for birth defects are joining World Birth Defects Day. We hope you’ll join us, too!