Halloween safety

31
Oct
Posted by Sara

Happy HalloweenToday is Halloween and the little ghosts and goblins in my house woke up excited and ready for trick-or-treating. Everyone wants Halloween to be fun but it should also be safe. Here are some great tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP):

Costumes:
• Try to buy light-colored costumes. Make sure they fit appropriately and are not too long so your little one does not trip. Also, make sure young children choose appropriate shoes—no high heels!
• Add reflective tape to costumes and trick-or-treat bags so that drivers can see children more easily.
• Masks can interfere with vision. Instead try using make-up. Make sure hats or wigs do not drop below the line of sight. Also, do not allow children to wear decorative contact lenses. These can be very dangerous. Contact lenses should only be worn with a doctor’s prescription.
• Make sure all costumes and any accessories are flame resistant.
• Swords should not be too sharp or too long.
• Have flashlights for everyone.

Trick-or-treating:
• Young children should never go trick-or-treating by themselves. Make sure a parent or other adult accompanies them.
• Children should make sure they only go to houses with porch lights that are on and they should never go inside a house or car for a treat.
• On Halloween children are most often injured while they are out walking. To keep them safe, make sure they:
o Stay in a group at all times. Someone should have a cell phone in case of emergencies.
o Make sure costumes and trick-or-treat bags are visible (use reflective tape or carry glow sticks and flashlights).
o Use sidewalks if available and stay on streets that are well-lit.
o Never cut across yards or use alleys.
o Never cross the street between parked cars or dart out of driveways.
o People driving may have trouble seeing trick-or-treaters. Make sure you stop and wait for all cars to pass.

Healthy ideas:
• Try getting your little ones to eat a healthy meal before they start trick-or-treating. This will help them avoid the urge to devour all their candy right away.
• You may want to have non-food items at your house for children with food allergies and sensitivities—or just as a fun alternative.
• It is best to wait until you are home to go through all of the candy. Throw away anything that appears expired or dangerous.
• Save some treats for later! And you may want to consider giving some away. Some dentist offices have Halloween candy buy-back programs. My children’s dentist is offering $3 per pound!

Make sure to go to AAP’s website for a lot more helpful information about making Halloween safe and fun for the whole family.

The special language of special needs

29
Oct
Posted by Barbara

kayak without a paddleIf you have a child with special needs, you have no doubt heard tons of words, initials or acronyms that you did not understand. You may have had to stop and ask for clarification or a definition. Or, even worse, you did not ask and were lost as the conversation zoomed on and you kept trying to make sense of it all.

The world of special needs, including delays, disabilities, early intervention and special education, has its own language. The sooner you familiarize yourself with the many acronyms, the easier it will be to navigate your child’s world and be an effective advocate. Without this info, it is like being in a boat (or a kayak) without a paddle.

Just to drive my point home, here is an analogy. Would you ever take an upper level language class without first taking the introductory course? Would you take Algebra II without first taking basic math? Would you take your driver’s test without looking at the manual first? You’d be lost (or at least I would be), and nothing would make sense to you. This is why you need to get the basics down, especially before you go into meetings that pertain to your baby or child’s intervention services.

Help is here

Here is my blog post with tons of acronyms to use as a cheat sheet. It is appropriately called Learning the Lingo.

Next, you can find many more on the CPIR website, where the NICHCY materials have migrated. Their Alphabet Soup has an exhaustive list of words with their meanings.

Lastly, Words and terms – a whole new world breaks out the terms pertaining to early intervention and then for special education.

So check them out, click on the highlighted terms to learn more, and print out the acronym sheet for your reference. You’ll be glad to have this info in one tidy place. Then, when the conversations turn to IFSPs or LREs, you will know exactly what everyone is talking about. Soon, you’ll be paddling upstream with confidence!

 

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need, select “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date. You can also see a Table of Contents of prior posts, here.

Feel free to ask questions. Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Celebrating Jonas Salk, MD

27
Oct
Posted by Lauren

Jonas SalkTomorrow is Jonas Salk’s 100th birthday. Salk’s eldest son Peter Salk, MD, recently came to the March of Dimes National Office to speak about his father and The Jonas Salk Legacy Foundation. It was touching to hear the history and personal stories about Salk.

Peter recounted how his father had initially thought he would become a lawyer or congressman. But college chemistry set him in a new direction. While attending NYU Medical School, a microbiology class inspired him to begin his quest in vaccine research. Before long, he became one of the most famous researchers of the 20th century.

Jonas Salk, MD. was intrigued by the idea of creating a vaccine from inactivated versions of a virus. He first worked on an inactivated flu vaccine but he is most remembered for his pioneering work in creating a polio vaccine in the midst of the polio epidemic.

Basil O’Connor, President of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (now known as the March of Dimes) was intrigued by Salk’s research and decided to fund Salk’s efforts to develop the vaccine against infantile paralysis, also known as polio. In 1955, it was announced that the Salk vaccine was safe and effective against this disabling, sometimes fatal infection. Salk’s vaccine rapidly reduced polio infections by 97%. With the help of the Salk vaccine and later the Sabin oral vaccine, both developed with March of Dimes funding, polio infections have been eliminated from the United States for nearly 3 decades. Polio still occurs, however, in some developing countries.

Salk vaccineIn addition to being a preeminent physician and researcher, Salk had a philosophical side. One question Salk would ask is “Are we being good ancestors?”  It was the foundation on which he based his life, and his unending quest to help improve mankind. Peter ended the presentation with one of Jonas’ quotes: “Hope lies in dreams, in imagination and in the courage of those who dare to make dreams into reality.” Jonas believed each person was responsible for making a difference in the world. By eradicating polio in the United States, Jonas Salk fulfilled his own dream.

You can learn more about Jonas Salk’s life and contributions by watching this historical footage reel.

The March of Dimes remembers, honors and celebrates Jonas Salk’s accomplishments as we continue our mission to improve the health of babies.

Safe sleep for babies

24
Oct
Posted by Sara

cropped sleeping babySafe sleep can help protect babies from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related dangers, like suffocation (not being able to breathe). Newborns sleep about 16 hours a day, so it’s important to make sure that where and how they sleep are safe.

Here are some things you can do to help keep your baby safe when she sleeps:

Where to put your baby to sleep
• Put your baby to sleep on her back on a flat, firm surface—a crib is best. Use only the mattress made for your baby’s crib. The mattress should fit snugly in the crib so there are no spaces between the mattress and the crib frame.
• Keep crib bumpers, loose bedding, toys and other soft objects out of your baby’s crib. They put babies in danger of getting trapped, strangled or suffocating. This is important even as your baby gets older. A study recently published in Pediatrics showed that “rolling to prone [stomach], with objects in the sleep area, is the predominant risk factor for older infants.”
• Share your bedroom with your baby but not your bed. Co-sleeping means that babies and parents sleep together in the same bed. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says that babies should not co-sleep with their parents and studies have shown that bed-sharing is the biggest risk factor for SIDS in children under four months. Instead, put your baby to bed in her own crib and keep it close to your bed during the night. This will allow you keep an eye on your baby and to breastfeed her easily.
• Don’t put your baby to sleep on a waterbed, sofa, soft mattress or other soft surface. “Of nearly 8,000 infant sleeping deaths in the United States, researchers found that about 12 percent were sofa-related. And nearly three-quarters of those infants were newborns.”

How to put your baby to sleep
• Put your baby to sleep on her back every time, until she’s 1 year old. It’s not safe for babies to sleep on their side or tummy. Most babies will roll over both ways by the end of the 7th month; but start them out on their backs.
• Dress your baby in light sleep clothes. Keep the room at a temperature that’s comfortable for you. If your baby is sweating or her chest feels hot, she may be overheated.
• Give your baby a pacifier for naps and at bedtime. Pacifiers may help protect against SIDS. Don’t hang the pacifier around your baby’s neck or attach the pacifier to your baby’s clothing or a stuffed animal.
• Don’t use products, such as special mattresses or wedges, that claim to reduce the risk of SIDS. There is no evidence that they do.

Mom and baby care
• Feed your baby only breast milk for at least 6 months. Continue breastfeeding your baby until at least her first birthday.
• Don’t smoke and don’t let anyone smoke in your home or around your baby.
• Take your baby to all her well baby visits and make sure she gets her vaccinations on time.
• Give your baby tummy time every day. Tummy time helps your baby develop her neck, shoulder and arm muscles.

Have questions? Email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Halloween ideas for kids with food allergies or sensory challenges

22
Oct
Posted by Barbara

pumpkinWhen you hear the word “Halloween” do you think of candy? Chocolate? Fun costumes? For children with food allergies or sensory issues, Halloween can be a frustrating evening. The thrill of getting treats can quickly become a letdown if there is nothing that your child can eat. And, the thought of wearing a costume may be the last thing your sensory special child will want to do.

Non-foods gain in popularity

Years ago, in my neighborhood, we knew of a child on our street who had food allergies. As a result, some moms decided to have an assortment of other acceptable treats to give out, so that the child with food allergies could enjoy Halloween, too.

We offered the kids non-chocolate choices, such as bags of pretzels, crackers and pops. But, surprisingly, the most popular alternatives were non-food items. Crayons, tiny notepads, little cars, plastic jewelry, glow stick necklaces, stickers, and other inexpensive but fun playthings soon became an equally desired treat for many children. I was surprised to see kids who did not have food allergies choosing stickers instead of a chocolate treat. Their eyes lit up when they saw my bucket filled with non-candy gifts. The best part is that you can get most of these items at dollar stores or discount centers, so offering alternatives won’t be a costly venture. Just be careful that you do not get tiny toys, as they can be a choking hazard to small children.

My colleague here at the March of Dimes said that the “best” house for trick or treating in her neighborhood was the one where they gave out quarters instead of candy. She and her friends loved it, as they could buy whatever treat they wanted. (But again, be careful you don’t give coins to young children as they are liable to put them in their mouths.)

When you stop to think, it makes perfect sense to widen the net of Halloween treats. Food allergies are becoming more common, so offering non-food treats is a perfect way to keep Halloween safe and yet be tons of fun. Why not think about offering non-candy treats this year and start a whole new tradition? But watch out – you may well end up being the most popular house on the block for trick or treaters!

Can’t wear a costume?

Little Red Riding HoodIf your child has sensory issues and can’t fathom the idea of putting on a costume, don’t fret. Just yesterday, a little 2 year old in my neighborhood toddled by my front steps as I was sitting there enjoying the sunshine. Her mom told me that she is sad because her daughter refuses to even try on a costume. I suggested she create a “costume” out of her regular clothes. For instance, if she has a red dress or a red hoodie, she can carry a little basket and be Little Red Riding Hood. (True confessions – I did this for my daughter when she was about that age!) Here are more ideas on how to prepare your child with sensory challenges for Halloween.  Also, you can ask your child’s Occupational Therapist for specific ideas that can make him comfortable.

Just remember, the most important thing is that your child is comfortable and safe, and has fun on Halloween.

What tricks have you tried to help your little one have fun on Halloween? Please share.

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need, select “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date. You can also see a Table of Contents of prior posts, here.

If you have comments or questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We welcome your input!

Did you get your pertussis vaccine?

20
Oct
Posted by Lauren

Pertussis VaccinePertussis, also referred to as whooping cough, is a respiratory infection that is easily spread and very dangerous for a baby. Pertussis can cause severe and uncontrollable coughing and trouble breathing. Pertussis can be fatal, especially in babies less than 1 year of age. And, about half of those babies who get whooping cough are hospitalized. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has reported 17,325 cases of pertussis from January 1-August 16, 2014, which represents a 30% increase compared to this time period in 2013. The best way to protect your baby and yourself against pertussis is to get vaccinated.

If you are pregnant:

Pregnant women should get the pertussis vaccine. The vaccine is safe to get before, during or after pregnancy, but works best if you get it during your pregnancy to better protect your baby once he is born. Your body creates protective antibodies and passes some of them to your baby before birth, which provides short term protection after your baby is born.  Your baby won’t get the first of the 3 infant vaccinations until he is 2 months old, so your vaccination during pregnancy helps to protect him until he receives his vaccines. The pertussis vaccine is part of the Tdap vaccine (which also includes tetanus and diphtheria).

The CDC recommends women get the Tdap vaccine during every pregnancy. The best time to get the shot is between your 27th through 36th week of pregnancy.

The vaccine is also recommended for caregivers, close friends and relatives who spend time with your baby.

Click here for more information or speak with your prenatal health care provider.

Bottom line
Get vaccinated for pertussis  – it may save your baby’s life.

Keeping safe from Ebola

17
Oct
Posted by Ivette

Lots of people are talking about Ebola. Here’s the deal. Ebola is a rare, but very serious disease caused by a virus. It’s spread by coming in direct contact with body fluids (like blood, breast milk, urine or vomit) from a person sick with the disease. You also can get Ebola if you have direct contact with items, like needles or sheets, that have an infected person’s body fluids on them.

Ebola can start with flu-like symptoms, but over time it can cause more serious health problems. Eventually, it can cause heavy bleeding, organ failure and death. Some research shows that Ebola in pregnancy can cause pregnancy loss.

The question many people have is: how can you keep safe from Ebola? Right now, there’s no vaccine to help prevent Ebola infection, but researchers are working to develop one as well as other treatments. In the meantime, here’s what you can do to help keep you and your family safe:

Wash your hands often! This helps prevent many viruses from spreading, including Ebola.
Avoid travel to places where there are Ebola outbreaks.
• Avoid coming in contact with someone who may be sick.

For the latest news on Ebola, visit the CDC website. Read our article to learn more about Ebola and pregnancy.

Honoring parents with angel babies

15
Oct
Posted by Barbara

yellow butterflyThe loss of a baby is heart wrenching.  As today is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day, I want to take a moment to honor those parents who have angel babies. Most people cannot even imagine being in their shoes for an instant, yet alone having to live a day-to-day existence without the baby they continue to love.

The loss of a baby touches so many people in profound and long lasting ways. No two individuals grieve in exactly the same manner. The mother may grieve differently from the father. Children who were expecting their sibling to come home from the hospital experience their own grief as well. Even grandparents and close friends may be deeply affected. The ripple effects from the loss of a baby are widely felt.

The March of Dimes is committed to preventing premature birth, birth defects and infant mortality. It is our hope that through continued research, we will have a positive impact on the lives of all babies so that fewer families will ever know the pain of losing a child.

If you or someone you know has lost a baby, we hope that our online community, Share Your Story will be a place of comfort and support to you. There, you will find other parents who have walked in your shoes and can relate to you in ways that other people cannot. Log on to “talk” with other parents who will understand your grief. We also have bereavement materials available free of charge. Simply send a request to AskUs@marchofdimes.org and we will mail them out to you.

Please know that the March of Dimes is thinking of you today and every day.

Unexplained muscle weakness in children

10
Oct
Posted by Beverly

We have all heard of the children in Colorado who have been hospitalized with unexplained muscle weakness. It has so far affected 10 children with an illness involving the brain and spinal cord.  Let us be clear, we have been told the children have been tested and it is NOT polio. The CDC and the California Department of Health have been looking further into the cause of some cases of paralysis earlier this year. However, differences exist between the California and Colorado cases, including age of the patients, timing of cases, etc.  You may have also heard that some of the children in Colorado have had cold-like symptoms and have tested positive for Enterovirus D68; while others have not.  As the doctors, labs, various health departments and the CDC work on finding out why the children are sick, there are some things you can do:

• Be up to date on all recommended vaccinations, including polio, flu, measles and whooping cough. It is important that you and your children are vaccinated.
• Wash your hands frequently with soap and water, especially after blowing your nose, going to the bathroom or changing a diaper.
• Avoid sick people.
• Clean and disinfect objects that have been touched by a sick person or by a visiting child.

One thing is key!  If your child is having problems walking, standing or develops sudden weakness in an arm or leg, contact a doctor right away.

According to the AAP, “Doctors and nurses who see patients with unexplained muscle weakness or paralysis in the arms or legs are testing them to see if they might have this sickness. They also are reporting information to their state or local health department.” The CDC will be issuing treatment guidelines in the next several weeks. The American Academy of Pediatrics is also monitoring cases of Enterovirus D68.

CDC features: Unexplained Paralysis Hospitalizes Children, 2014

AAP News: CDC continues investigation of neurologic illness: will issue guidelines, 2014

 

Flu is dangerous for certain people

08
Oct
Posted by Barbara

You’ve all heard it: get your flu shot. It is on our blog, website, and we just finished a twitter chat with the CDC, FDA, AAP, doctors, and other notable tired-toddlerorganizations. Everyone agrees that getting the flu shot is the single best form of protection from flu.

Is it really that important?

Yes. Flu can be life-threatening. Certain groups of people are at higher risk of serious complications from flu:

• Children younger than 5 years of age and especially kids younger than 2 years old.

• Children of any age with long-term health conditions including developmental disabilities. See this post to learn which high risk conditions are included.

• Children of any age with neurologic conditions. Some children with neurologic conditions may have trouble with muscle function, lung function or difficulty coughing, swallowing, or clearing fluids from their airways. These problems can make flu symptoms worse. Learn more here.

• Pregnant women. They are at high risk of having serious health complications from flu which include miscarriage, preterm labor, premature birth or having a low-birthweight baby. In some cases, flu during pregnancy can even be deadly. By getting a flu shot during pregnancy, your baby will be protected up until six months of age.

•  Adults older than age 65 (attention grandparents!).

When should you talk to your provider?

According to the CDC, you should seek advice from your provider before getting a flu shot if you are allergic to eggs, have had Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), have had a prior severe reaction to the flu shot or to an ingredient in the shot, or are not feeling well.

Bottom line- get your flu shot

Read my post Test your flu knowledge – true or false? to learn the truth about flu.  Knowledge is powerful.

If you have questions, speak with your health care provider or visit flu.gov .

 
Note: This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need, select “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date.

If you have comments or questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We welcome your input!