See how your state is doing on childhood vaccination rates

07
Dec
Posted by Sara

baby vaccinationYou know that vaccines are very important. They protect your baby from serious childhood illnesses. Over the years vaccines have prevented countless cases of disease and saved millions of lives.

However, immunization rates across the United States vary. In order to show how vaccination rates differ among individual states, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has developed an interactive digital map that shows state immunization rates for vaccine-preventable diseases, including:

  • Flu: The best way to protect your baby from the flu is to make sure he gets a flu shot each year before flu season (October through May). Even though your baby’s more likely to get the flu during flu season, he can get it any time of year. The flu shot contains a vaccine that helps prevent your baby from getting the flu. Children older than 6 months can get the flu shot. Your baby gets two flu shots in his first year life. He then gets one shot each year after.
  • Varicella: This vaccine protects your child from chickenpox, an infection that spreads easily and causes itchy skin, rash and fever.
  • Diptheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTaP): Diptheria causes a thick covering in the back of the throat and can lead to breathing problems, paralysis, heart failure, and even death. Tetanus (lockjaw) is a serious disease that causes painful tightening of the muscles, usually all over the body. And pertussis (also called whooping cough) is a highly contagious respiratory tract infection that is dangerous for a baby.
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR): This vaccine protects your baby against measles, mumps and rubella (also called German measles). Measles is a disease that’s easily spread and may cause rash, cough and fever. Mumps may cause fever, headache and swollen glands. Rubella causes mild flu-like symptoms and a skin rash.
  • HPV (human papillomavirus): This vaccine protects against the infection that causes genital warts. The infection also may lead to cervical cancer. The CDC recommends that women up to age 26 get the HPV vaccine.

According to the AAP, “The map also highlights recent outbreaks of disease that have occurred in communities where pockets of low-immunization rates left the population vulnerable. While immunization rates have remained steady or increased for many vaccines over the past decade, recent studies show that unvaccinated children are often geographically clustered in communities. These pockets of under-immunization are at higher risk of disease and have been the source of disease outbreaks, as seen with the 2014 measles outbreak in California.”

Vaccines don’t just protect the person who receives them, but they also protect more vulnerable populations, such as infants and children who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons.

Check out the map to find out what the childhood vaccination rate is in your state and how it compares to others. And remember to make sure that you and your children are up to date on all your vaccinations!

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Looking for a reason to get a flu shot? Here are 10 good ones.

05
Dec
Posted by Barbara

DoctorPregnant_zps3ac96800Many myths abound about whether a flu shot is important. Here are 10 facts that should convince you that a flu shot is good for you and your family:

  1. Flu can be life threatening. Children younger than 5, and especially kids younger than 2 are at a higher risk of complications from flu.
  2. Children of any age with long term health conditions, including developmental disabilities, are at a higher risk of serious problems from flu.
  3. Children with neurologic conditions, and kids who have trouble with lung function, difficulty coughing, swallowing or clearing their airways can have serious complications from flu.
  4. Pregnant women can have consequences from flu that include miscarriage, preterm labor, premature birth or giving birth to a baby with a low birthweight. It’s safe to get a flu shot any time during pregnancy.
  5. Babies can’t get their own flu shot until they are at least 6 months of age. This is another reason why women should get a flu shot during pregnancy. The protection will pass to the baby when she is born.
  6. Since babies are at risk until they’re vaccinated, protect them by making sure the people around them are vaccinated – all caretakers, family members and relatives.
  7. Adults older than age 65 (grandparents!) can suffer serious consequences from the flu.
  8. You don’t get the flu from the flu shot. It is made up of inactivated (dead) flu virus. You may experience soreness at the injection site, have a headache, aches or a fever but these symptoms should go away within a day or two. The flu lasts much longer and is more severe.
  9. Aside from barricading yourself in a room all winter long (?!) the best way to protect yourself from flu is to get vaccinated.
  10. This year, the flu vaccines have been updated to better match circulating viruses. There are also different options available, including one for people with egg allergies. Your healthcare provider can advise you.

So, what are you waiting for? Go get protected!

Here’s more info about people at high risk of developing flu-related complications and answers to frequently asked questions can be found here.

Helping your baby thrive in the NICU

02
Dec
Posted by Sara

This video clip contains great information on nurturing your baby in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In the video, real NICU parents describe different ways to bond with your baby while in the hospital, including skin-to-skin or kangaroo care.

 

 

For more helpful information about caring for your baby in the NICU, please visit our website. Learn about resources and support that can help you and your family while your baby’s in the NICU. Also, you can go to Share Your Story, the March of Dimes online community for families to share experiences with prematurity, birth defects or loss.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Zika virus case believed to be found in Texas

29
Nov
Posted by Barbara

Aedes aegypti mosquitoHealth officials in South Texas believe they have identified their first locally transmitted case of Zika virus in a woman living in Brownsville.

A locally transmitted case means that the person who got the Zika virus did not get it by traveling to a place where it is commonly found nor did the person have sex with someone who has the virus. She also did not get it through a blood transfusion or in a lab setting. In other words, it was most likely spread by an infected mosquito.

Texas health officials have set up surveillance sites in the Brownsville area where the infected woman lives, to test mosquitoes for possible infection. They are also trying to find out if anyone else in the area has been infected with the virus.

CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. said “Even though it is late in the mosquito season, mosquitoes can spread Zika in some areas of the country. Texas is doing the right thing by increasing local surveillance and trapping and testing mosquitoes in the Brownsville area.”

The CDC’s press release states: “As of Nov 23, 2016, 4,444 cases of Zika have been reported to CDC in the continental United States and Hawaii; 182 of these were the result of local spread by mosquitoes. These cases include 36 believed to be the result of sexual transmission and one that was the result of a laboratory exposure. This number does not include the current case under investigation in Texas.”

Now that the cold weather has arrived, you may think that the Zika virus is a thing of the past. But, this announcement of a likely locally transmitted case of Zika should be a reminder that Zika is still here, and it is still a threat.

If a woman gets infected with Zika during pregnancy, she can pass it to her baby. It can cause a birth defect called microcephaly, congenital Zika syndrome, and other developmental problems.

Read why Zika is harmful to pregnant women and babies, and what you need to know to keep you and your family safe.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Vote for us in Healthline’s Best Health Blog Contest

25
Nov
Posted by Barbara

We’re thrilled! News Moms Need has been nominated in Healthline’s “Best Health Blog Contest.” Now, we need your votes to win.

Won’t you take a moment each day, from now until December 12th, to cast your vote for us? It’s simple:

2016 Healthline winner widgetWe were grateful when we were selected as a winner in Healthline’s Best Pregnancy Blogs earlier this year.  Now, Healthline’s Best Health Blog award would be an even greater honor, especially as we cover topics from preconception to childbirth, to babies with special needs and staying safe from Zika.

Our goal is to keep you and your family healthy  – all News Moms Need!

We’d love to receive this award. But most of all, we’d love to know that you support our blog.

Thanks so much in advance for voting.

Your bloggers,

Barbara, Sara and Lauren

 

 

Pass the turkey, gravy, and the family health history form

23
Nov
Posted by Lauren

thanksgiving-turkey21Thanksgiving, or any other family gathering, is a great time to share good times, delicious food, and family memories. It is also a great time to learn about your family health history.

Taking your family health history can help you make important health decisions. It can help you learn about the health of your baby even before he’s born! Knowing about health conditions before or early in pregnancy can help you and your health care provider decide on treatments and care for your baby.

By understanding the health issues that run in your family, you can take positive steps for a healthier future. Since 2004, the Surgeon General has declared Thanksgiving as National Family History Day.  Here are a couple of ways you can easily gather your FHH:

So, somewhere between dinner and dessert, start a conversation with your relatives, and find out about your family health history.  The info you learn may make a huge difference in all of your lives, and in your baby’s life!

 

Prematurity Awareness Month continues…and here’s why

21
Nov
Posted by Barbara

WPD12-541WorldPrematurityDay2012Memes_01

Smoking increases the chance of premature birth

18
Nov
Posted by Sara

cigarette-buttsAlthough many people know that smoking during pregnancy can cause problems, 10% of pregnant women reported smoking during the last 3 months of pregnancy. When you smoke during pregnancy, your baby is exposed to dangerous chemicals like nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar. These chemicals can lessen the amount of oxygen that your baby gets. This can slow your baby’s growth before birth and can damage your baby’s heart, lungs and brain.

If you smoke during pregnancy, you’re more likely to have:

If you smoke during pregnancy, your baby is more likely to:

Secondhand and thirdhand smoke are also bad for your baby’s health. Being around secondhand smoke during pregnancy can cause your baby to be born with low birthweight.  Babies who are around secondhand smoke are more likely than babies who aren’t to have health problems, like pneumonia, ear infections and breathing problems, such as asthma, bronchitis and lung problems. There are also at an increased risk of SIDS.

If you quit smoking during pregnancy, you and your baby immediately benefit. According to the CDC, here’s how:

  • Your baby will get more oxygen, even after just one day of not smoking.
  • There is less risk that your baby will be born too early.
  • There is a better chance that your baby will come home from the hospital with you.
  • You will be less likely to develop heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, chronic lung disease, and other smoke-related diseases.
  • You will be more likely to live to know your grandchildren.
  • You will have more energy and breathe more easily.
  • Your clothes, hair, and home will smell better.
  • Your food will taste better.
  • You will have more money that you can spend on other things.
  • You will feel good about what you have done for yourself and your baby.

So make a plan to quit today. Need help? Check out these resources:

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Join in World Prematurity Day activities tomorrow

16
Nov
Posted by Barbara

Light the world purple

The world will light up purple tomorrow to bring awareness to the problem of preterm birth.

Landmarks all over the world will be ablaze in purple to honor premature babies.

Tomorrow marks the 6th annual World Prematurity Day (WPD).

One in ten babies is born too soon. Premature birth is the leading cause of death in children under the age of five worldwide. Babies born too early may have more health issues than babies born on time, and may face long term health problems that affect the brain, lungs, hearing or vision. World Prematurity Day on November 17 raises awareness of this serious health crisis.

In New York City, the Empire State Building will be bathed in purple lights. State Capitol buildings in Alabama, Pennsylvania and Tennessee will light up purple, too.Here are just a few more places where World Prematurity Day will be glowing:

  • Birmingham Zoo, AL;
  • Union Plaza Building (downtown skyline), Little Rock, AR;
  • All 5 river bridges spanning the Arkansas River;
  • Hippodrome Theater, Gainesville, FL;
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH;
  • Howard Hughes Corporation Building, Honolulu, HI;
  • Power & Light Building, Kansas City, MO;
  • Biloxi Lighthouse, MS;
  • Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA;
  • The Auxilio Mutuo Hospital, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico.

What can you do?

Share your story and video about babies born too soon here on our blog, as well as on Facebook.

Get decked out in purple tomorrow, take a photo and post it to social media with #worldprematurityday and #givethemtomorrow.

Together, we can honor the 380,000 babies born too soon each year in the U.S.

Together, we can let people know that 15 million babies are born too soon around the world every year, and that 1 million of them won’t live to their first birthday.

Together, we can change the face of premature birth and give every baby a fighting chance.

Please join us tomorrow, to raise your voice.

4

Sometimes, love comes early – Pampers is offering a touch of love for those who do

14
Nov
Posted by Lauren

Kangaroo care Skin-to-Skin-223x300Today we welcome guest blogger Amy Tally, Senior Scientist, Pampers Hospital Diaper Development, P&G.

At Pampers, we believe every touch of love matters to the health and development of babies, especially the most vulnerable ones. That is why we’ve joined forces with the March of Dimes under the Pampers Touches of Love campaign this fall to celebrate all babies, especially those in the NICU, and those who care for them.

As part of this campaign, through World Prematurity Day on November 17, we’re asking everyone to show us all the ways that you give babies touches of love (from a hand hold or kiss on the forehead to wrapping your baby in a blanket chosen especially for her or him). For every #touchesoflove moment shared with @Pampers on Twitter & Facebook and @PampersUS on Instagram, we’ll make a $1 donation to the March of Dimes.*

One of the main reasons for our Touches of Love campaign was to underscore the importance of another major development from Pampers. We’ve worked closely with hospitals, pediatricians and nurses for 40 years, and as my colleagues and I met with hundreds of nurses over the past three years, they shared that current preemie diapers do not properly fit the smallest premature babies, and they were having to cut or fold the diaper or improvise ways to make it fit.

This is why we recently introduced our smallest diaper yet – the new Pampers Preemie Swaddlers Size P-3 diaper– because of all the challenges faced by babies who are born prematurely, a properly fitting diaper shouldn’t be one of them. Designed in partnership with NICU nurses, this diaper caters to the unique needs of babies weighing as little as one pound (500 grams) – to offer them a small touch of love. From the narrow core which offers Pampers excellent protection and allows their legs to lay comfortably and be optimally positioned, to the Absorb Away Liner™ that pulls away wetness and loose stools, a common side effect of antibiotics that premature babies are given, the new size P-3 diaper was created with the care and comfort of these tiny, premature babies at the forefront every step of the way. These size P-3 diapers are currently available in select hospitals in the United States, and will be available to hospitals across the U.S. and Canada before the end of 2016.

Being part of the development team, I can tell you that the creation of the new Pampers Preemie Swaddlers P-3 diapers was truly a labor of love. We wanted to make sure that our new diaper wrapped the tiniest babies in a gentle, loving touch because we understand that for premature babies, touch is not only a sign of love, but also a catalyst for survival and growth.

*Up to a maximum of $5,000. In addition, Pampers has made a donation of $100,000 in support of the Touches of Love campaign.

The March of Dimes does not endorse specific brands or products.