Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Q and A for CMV

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

bellyYou may have heard of CMV because it’s the most common virus passed from mothers to babies during pregnancy.

Cytomegalovirus, also called CMV, is a kind of herpesvirus. There are many different kinds of herpesviruses – some of which are sexually transmitted diseases, but others can cause cold sores or infections like CMV.

Q. Who gets it?

A. Many people get CMV at some point in their lives, most often during childhood. Most people with CMV have no signs or symptoms but some may have a sore throat, a fever, swollen glands, or feel tired all the time.

Q. Is CMV dangerous?

A. It can be  – CMV can pass to your baby at any time during pregnancy, labor and delivery and even while breastfeeding. If you have CMV during pregnancy, there is a 1 in 3 chance it will pass to your baby. Eighty percent of babies born with CMV never have symptoms or problems caused by the infection. But about fifteen percent of babies develop a disability such as hearing loss, vision loss or an intellectual disability like trouble learning or communicating.

Q. Can you find out if you or your baby have CMV?

A. Yes. You can have a blood test done during pregnancy to test for CMV. And you can have prenatal tests to see if your baby has CMV. After birth, your baby’s bodily fluids like her urine and saliva can be tested for CMV. Some babies with CMV will have signs or symptoms at birth, but many will appear healthy so testing is important.

Q. Is there any treatment?

A. Yes. If your baby was born with CMV, she may be treated with antiviral medicines to kill the infection. Scientists are working to develop a vaccine for CMV.

In the meantime, remember to always wash your hands well after being in contact with body fluids, when changing diapers or wiping noses, and carefully throw diapers and tissues away. Don’t kiss young children on the mouth or cheek and don’t share food, glasses and eating utensils with children or anyone who may have CMV. These precautions can help you protect yourself and your baby.

Q. If you had CMV in a previous pregnancy, what are the chances you may get it again in another pregnancy? See this post for answers.

If you think you may have (or had) CMV, be sure to talk to your prenatal care provider. See our article to learn more about CMV including treatments.

Questions? Email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Preeclampsia: Impact on mom and baby

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

May was Preeclampsia Awareness Month. We blogged about the signs, symptoms and causes of preeclampsia and how it may lead to premature birth. We also hosted a Twitter chat with Dr. Kjersti Aagaard of Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women, which generated some follow-up questions.

We’re happy to welcome back Dr. Aagaard and her colleague Dr. Martha Rac as guest bloggers. Both doctors are maternal-fetal medicine specialists at Texas Children’s. They will share some insight into who is most at risk of developing preeclampsia and how it can impact both mom and baby.

First, we must ask, who is at the highest risk for developing preeclampsia?

 Risk factors for preeclampsia include:

  • First time mothers
  • Pregnancy with a new partner than previous pregnancies – different partners may have varying genetic factors that may increase preeclampsia risk
  • Older mothers (>35 years old)
  • Black women
  • Medical problems including chronic high blood pressure, kidney disease, lupus, diabetes and heart disease
  • Pregnancies with multiples (twins, triplets, etc.)
  • Obesity
  • Preeclampsia in prior pregnancies
  • IVF pregnancies – particularly those with donor eggs. This is thought to occur as a result of genetic differences between the mother and fetus, causing the mother’s immune system to attack the “foreign” fetal tissue and cause excess inflammation.

In addition to the risk factors above, mothers with pregnancies spaced too closely together or very far apart can be at risk. Too close may be defined as 18 months or less and far apart as 4-5 years between pregnancies.

How does preeclampsia affect pregnancy?

Preeclampsia is classified as either mild or severe based on a woman’s symptoms, and how severely it affects her organs. It is a progressive disorder, which means that mild cases will eventually develop into severe preeclampsia, if not treated.

Preeclampsia can be very dangerous to both the mother and the baby. The very high blood pressure associated with preeclampsia can result in anything from seizures, stroke, liver and kidney dysfunction, bleeding problems, placental detachment and even death if left untreated.

If a mother-to-be suspects she may be experiencing preeclampsia, she should contact her doctor immediately.

How does preeclampsia impact the baby?

 This dangerous disorder can cause the baby’s growth to be restricted and increases the risk of stillbirth. In the most severe cases, preterm delivery may be required which may then expose the baby to the complications of prematurity such as under-developed organs, breathing difficulties, jaundice, anemia, a lowered immune system, etc.

In the worst cases, fetal death can occur from a sudden detachment of the placenta from the uterus.

For these reasons, women diagnosed with preeclampsia undergo additional monitoring such as: ultrasounds every 4 weeks to evaluate fetal growth, lab work to determine if there is multi-organ involvement, etc. and delivery no later than 37 weeks.

If you are worried you are at risk of developing this dangerous disorder, please be sure to consult with your doctor and discuss your concerns immediately.

Dr. Kjersti AagaardDr. Martha Rac

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many thanks to Dr. Aagaard  (left) and Dr. Rac  (right) for contributing their expertise. 

If you have questions, send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

 

What’s one often forgotten, but very important, “must do” during pregnancy?

Monday, June 19th, 2017

teethThere are so many “do’s and don’ts” during pregnancy that it’s sometimes hard to keep track of them all. But one important “do” that sometimes gets overlooked is the need to keep up with oral care.

Somehow, brushing your teeth and going for regular dental cleanings seem to fall down on the list. But did you know that at-home and professional dental care are also important parts of a healthy pregnancy?

Pregnancy can affect dental health

During pregnancy, your changing hormones may affect the way your body reacts to plaque that builds up on your teeth. The result can be redness, swelling and bleeding gums called “pregnancy gingivitis.” In fact, nearly 70% of women experience gingivitis during pregnancy.

You also have more blood flowing through your body and more acid in your mouth when you are pregnant. All these changes mean you are more likely to have dental problems, such as loose teeth, gum disease, non-cancerous “pregnancy tumors” which form on your gums, tooth decay and even tooth loss. (See our article for more details on any of these dental issues.)

What’s the answer?

Consider oral care a “must do” on your healthy pregnancy list. Regular professional dental care as well as a good daily oral routine (brushing, flossing) are very important parts of your pregnancy.

Brushing your teeth is something that you’ve done since childhood. Even going to the dentist is something that (hopefully) you are doing regularly. Dental exams help to prevent tooth decay and gingivitis (gum inflammation), and let’s face it – your teeth look sparkly clean afterwards!

Bottom line

Take your prenatal vitamins, get plenty of rest, eat well, stay active, keep up with brushing your teeth, AND go to your prenatal and dental appointments.

Your smile and baby will thank you.

 

Have questions? Email AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Too much? Too little? Or just right?

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

pregnant-woman-on-weight-scale-shrunkWeight gain seems to always be one of the topics of conversation for pregnant women. “How much should I gain?” “How do I stay healthy?” Turns out, how much weight you gain during pregnancy is very important.

Gaining the right amount of weight during pregnancy can help protect your health and the health of your baby. And gaining too much or too little can be harmful.

So how much weight gain is recommended?

Your health care provider uses your body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy to figure out how much weight you should gain during pregnancy. BMI is your body fat based on your height and weight.

  • Underweight = BMI less than 18.5
  • Healthy weight = BMI 18.5 to 24.9
  • Overweight = BMI 25 to 29.9
  • Obese = BMI more than 30

If you’re pregnant with one baby, the recommendations are as follows:

  • If you were underweight before pregnancy, you want to gain about 28 to 40 pounds during pregnancy.
  • If you were at a healthy weight before pregnancy, you want to gain about 25 to 35 pounds during pregnancy.
  • If you were overweight before pregnancy, you want to gain about 15 to 25 pounds during pregnancy.
  • If you were obese before pregnancy, you want to gain about 11 to 20 pounds during pregnancy.

And while you don’t want to gain too much or too little weight, don’t ever try to lose weight during pregnancy. If you have questions about healthy weight gain during pregnancy, talk to your health care provider.

Cooking out this weekend?

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

pregnant couple with grocery bagMemorial Day weekend is prime time for cookouts and family gatherings. And there’s one activity that can always bring people together – eating! Whether you’re hosting or preparing a side dish, be sure you take precautions in your preparations and in how your dish is served. These tips are especially important for pregnant women.

Before you begin your prep, here’s some tips to ensure your meal is a success:

  • Wash your hands. And then wash all of your fruits and vegetables and cut away any damaged sections.
  • Keep your raw meats and the tools you used to prepare them and keep them separate from the rest of your foods and supplies.
  • Make sure your meats such as hamburgers and grilled chicken are cooked thoroughly.
  • Be sure any salads and dishes with mayonnaise are kept cold and out of the sun.
  • Be sure to put leftovers away quickly – within 2 hours after eating.

Why the extra precaution?

Bacteria from foods can cause Salmonella and Listeriosis, both of which can be harmful to pregnant women.

Listeriosis is a kind of food poisoning caused by Listeria bacteria. This type of bacteria can come from hot dogs, unwashed fruits and vegetables and cold salads.

Salmonella is another kind of food poisoning caused by Salmonella bacteria. You can find this kind of bacteria in undercooked poultry, meat, fish or eggs.

If you’re pregnant, one of these types of food poisoning can cause serious problems for you and your baby, including premature birth, miscarriage and stillbirth. This is why it’s important to prepare your foods properly and serve foods that are safe. Your guests will be sure to thank you for a wonderful cookout and great company.

Have questions about a certain dish you are planning to make? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Repeat lead tests are advised for certain children, pregnant women and breastfeeding moms

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

blood-testsToday, the FDA and CDC issued a notice that some lead tests done by Magellan Diagnostics may be incorrect.

The FDA says “certain lead tests manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics may provide inaccurate results for some children and adults in the United States.”

If you have a child age 6 years old or younger, are pregnant or breastfeeding, speak with your healthcare provider or local health department to determine if retesting is needed.

The dangers of lead

Lead is a metal that comes from the ground, but it can be in air, water and food. You can’t see, smell or taste it. High levels of lead in your body can cause serious health problems for you and your family.

Children younger than 6 years of age can be severely affected by lead. It can cause developmental problems, hearing loss, vomiting, irritability, belly pain and weight loss. Very high levels of lead may even cause death.

Lead poisoning (high levels of lead in your body) can cause serious problems during pregnancy, such as premature birth, miscarriage, and high blood pressure. It can also cause fertility problems, mood disorders, headaches, muscle or joint pain, trouble concentrating, belly pain, anemia and fatigue in adults.

Where is lead?

Most lead comes from paint in older homes. When old paint cracks or peels, it makes dust that has lead in it. The dust may be too small to see. You can breathe in the dust and not know it.

Lead may be found in drinking water, at construction sites, in arts and crafts materials used to make stained glass, lead crystal glassware, and some soil.

For more information on lead poisoning, see our web article and the CDC’s information.

Bottom line

If you have a child age 6 or younger, or you are pregnant or breastfeeding, contact your healthcare provider to determine if a lead test should be repeated.

Have questions? Contact our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

You can find more news on our News Moms Need blog.

 

Need a few ways to get to a healthier you? We’ve got them!

Monday, May 15th, 2017

#MCHchat 5.16.17This week is National Women’s Health Week.

Join our Twitter chat tomorrow from 12 – 1pm EST, to learn about ways to feel good and be your best self.

Use #MCHChat to join the conversation!

In the meantime, here are some ways to jump start getting to a healthier you.

The good thing about summer coming is the warm weather. There is nothing I love more than going out for a walk on my lunch break. I get my blood moving and it’s a chance to listen to an audio book, catch up with a friend or just take in the scenery. When I get back to my desk I feel refreshed and ready to tackle the next project.

Living a healthy lifestyle isn’t just about getting out and exercising though, it’s about your whole self. This includes your body and your mind. Things like getting enough sleep at night and managing your stress levels are related to your health. Even wearing your seatbelt and avoiding texting while driving will help you take steps to a healthier lifestyle.

What are a few ways you can make a big difference in your life?

  • Schedule a checkup with your health care provider for a well-woman visit. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant soon, this is a perfect time to schedule a preconception visit. You’ll want to be as healthy as possible before getting pregnant.
  • Keep tabs on how your mind and emotions are doing – are you stressed? sad? anxious? Your provider can help you figure out ways to manage all that life throws your way.
  • Make a grocery list before you go to the store – this will help you plan meals and avoid making unhealthy impulse purchases.
  • Take advantage of the nice weather! Go for a walk or bike ride.
  • Are you a smoker? You can get help to quit – ask your provider for resources or call 1-800-Quit-Now.

Small steps can lead to big changes

If making healthy changes feels overwhelming, take it one item at a time. This week, call your provider and make your well-woman appointment. Next week try to add on something else, like a 10 minute walk during lunchtime.

Small changes can lead to big leaps in getting to a healthier you. Take it day by day, and week by week.

 

Sharing Mommy Moments for Mother’s Day

Friday, May 12th, 2017

Family walking outdoorsMother’s Day is coming up this Sunday. Let’s take some time to share special moments and memories.

What are some meaningful memories you have of your mother?

Are you a mom? What are some of the most memorable moments with your child that you cherish?

Do you have any humorous stories that would be fun to share?

Here are a couple from me to start us off:

“Dinner’s ready! Wash your hands!” my mother calls. We all show up at the table and it’s obvious that my brother’s hands are not clean. “But I washed them!” he protested. “So why are they still dirty ?” my mother asks. He looks at his hands to see the dirt on the top of his hands (not on his palms) and says “Oh – I had to wash the top, too??”

When we got a new TV and I was having trouble figuring out how the remote control worked, my son picked up the remote and took over effortlessly. My daughter then turned to me and said “Mommy – you need to practice more!”

Here are some from my colleagues:

“Walk…don’t run” my mother said. I wish I had listened. I was so excited that “our” lake was frozen enough that I could ice-skate, so I started to run up the outside stairs from the lake to the house, and of course, slipped on the icy step and fractured my wrist.  No skating that season for me…

One great memory I have from growing up with my mom is her surprise lunches. Every day at school I would sit down and open my lunch box to see what she had put together for me. She always cut my peanut butter and jelly sandwiches into fun shapes and designs and often included a little love note. It was as if I was getting a hug from her all the way at school and it always put a big smile on my face.

What’s your mommy moment? Please share.

And to all moms and moms-to-be, have a wonderful Mother’s Day!

 

Thank you to all nurses!

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

Nurse holding babyIf your baby was in the NICU, you most likely spent a great deal of time with her team of nurses. Likewise, if you had a difficult pregnancy, a nurse was probably by your side assisting you the whole way.

Nurses are critical in the care of mothers and babies. Many families who have had a baby born prematurely or with a health condition have told us just how fantastic the nursing staff was at their hospital. Nurses are hardworking, compassionate, highly educated professionals who work around the clock to ensure that you and your baby get the care you need.

In honor of National Nurse’s Week we want to thank all of the nurses that have impacted March of Dimes’ families. In particular, we wish to congratulate the four nurses who won the March of Dimes Graduate Nursing Scholarship Awards.

To recognize and promote excellence in nursing care of mothers and babies, the March of Dimes offers several $5,000 scholarships annually to registered nurses enrolled in graduate programs of maternal-child nursing. The March of Dimes Dr. Margaret C. Freda Graduate Nursing Scholarship Award was established in 2016 to honor long-time March of Dimes National Nurse Advisory Council Chair, volunteer, and friend, Dr. Margaret Comerford Freda. This award is given each year to the highest scoring graduate nursing scholarship applicant. Congratulations to our winners!

Did you have an amazing nurse that took care of you or your baby? How did he or she impact your NICU stay?

Share your story and help us thank all nurses for their unending dedication and incredibly hard work.

 

Prevent syphilis in your baby

Monday, May 8th, 2017

doctorCongenital syphilis (present at birth) can cause serious lifelong health conditions, or even death, for a baby. Unfortunately, the number of congenital syphilis cases in the United States increased 46 percent between 2012 and 2015.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD), also known as a sexually transmitted infection (STI). You can get it by having unprotected sex with someone who is infected with syphilis. You can also get it by having direct contact with an infected person’s syphilis sore which may be on a person’s lips, in their mouth or on their genitals.

If a woman has syphilis and gets pregnant, she needs to be treated for syphilis. If she doesn’t receive treatment, syphilis can pass to her baby.

The good news is that congenital syphilis is preventable:

  1. Protect yourself first. Either don’t have sex or have safe sex by using a condom or other barrier method.
  2. Go to all your prenatal care checkups; your provider will test you for syphilis.
  3. If you have syphilis, your provider will begin treatment. The sooner you receive treatment, the less likely you and your baby may have complications from the infection.
  4. Ask your partner to be tested (and treated) for syphilis, so that you don’t get infected or re-infected.

If you’re not sure whether you have syphilis, or think you may have been exposed to it, contact your healthcare provider.

See our article for more details about protecting yourself and your baby from syphilis. Our article includes diagnosis and treatment information, too.

If you have questions, text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.