Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Cooking out this weekend?

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

pregnant couple with grocery bagMemorial Day weekend is prime time for cookouts and family gatherings. And there’s one activity that can always bring people together – eating! Whether you’re hosting or preparing a side dish, be sure you take precautions in your preparations and in how your dish is served. These tips are especially important for pregnant women.

Before you begin your prep, here’s some tips to ensure your meal is a success:

  • Wash your hands. And then wash all of your fruits and vegetables and cut away any damaged sections.
  • Keep your raw meats and the tools you used to prepare them and keep them separate from the rest of your foods and supplies.
  • Make sure your meats such as hamburgers and grilled chicken are cooked thoroughly.
  • Be sure any salads and dishes with mayonnaise are kept cold and out of the sun.
  • Be sure to put leftovers away quickly – within 2 hours after eating.

Why the extra precaution?

Bacteria from foods can cause Salmonella and Listeriosis, both of which can be harmful to pregnant women.

Listeriosis is a kind of food poisoning caused by Listeria bacteria. This type of bacteria can come from hot dogs, unwashed fruits and vegetables and cold salads.

Salmonella is another kind of food poisoning caused by Salmonella bacteria. You can find this kind of bacteria in undercooked poultry, meat, fish or eggs.

If you’re pregnant, one of these types of food poisoning can cause serious problems for you and your baby, including premature birth, miscarriage and stillbirth. This is why it’s important to prepare your foods properly and serve foods that are safe. Your guests will be sure to thank you for a wonderful cookout and great company.

Have questions about a certain dish you are planning to make? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Repeat lead tests are advised for certain children, pregnant women and breastfeeding moms

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

blood-testsToday, the FDA and CDC issued a notice that some lead tests done by Magellan Diagnostics may be incorrect.

The FDA says “certain lead tests manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics may provide inaccurate results for some children and adults in the United States.”

If you have a child age 6 years old or younger, are pregnant or breastfeeding, speak with your healthcare provider or local health department to determine if retesting is needed.

The dangers of lead

Lead is a metal that comes from the ground, but it can be in air, water and food. You can’t see, smell or taste it. High levels of lead in your body can cause serious health problems for you and your family.

Children younger than 6 years of age can be severely affected by lead. It can cause developmental problems, hearing loss, vomiting, irritability, belly pain and weight loss. Very high levels of lead may even cause death.

Lead poisoning (high levels of lead in your body) can cause serious problems during pregnancy, such as premature birth, miscarriage, and high blood pressure. It can also cause fertility problems, mood disorders, headaches, muscle or joint pain, trouble concentrating, belly pain, anemia and fatigue in adults.

Where is lead?

Most lead comes from paint in older homes. When old paint cracks or peels, it makes dust that has lead in it. The dust may be too small to see. You can breathe in the dust and not know it.

Lead may be found in drinking water, at construction sites, in arts and crafts materials used to make stained glass, lead crystal glassware, and some soil.

For more information on lead poisoning, see our web article and the CDC’s information.

Bottom line

If you have a child age 6 or younger, or you are pregnant or breastfeeding, contact your healthcare provider to determine if a lead test should be repeated.

Have questions? Contact our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

You can find more news on our News Moms Need blog.

 

Need a few ways to get to a healthier you? We’ve got them!

Monday, May 15th, 2017

#MCHchat 5.16.17This week is National Women’s Health Week.

Join our Twitter chat tomorrow from 12 – 1pm EST, to learn about ways to feel good and be your best self.

Use #MCHChat to join the conversation!

In the meantime, here are some ways to jump start getting to a healthier you.

The good thing about summer coming is the warm weather. There is nothing I love more than going out for a walk on my lunch break. I get my blood moving and it’s a chance to listen to an audio book, catch up with a friend or just take in the scenery. When I get back to my desk I feel refreshed and ready to tackle the next project.

Living a healthy lifestyle isn’t just about getting out and exercising though, it’s about your whole self. This includes your body and your mind. Things like getting enough sleep at night and managing your stress levels are related to your health. Even wearing your seatbelt and avoiding texting while driving will help you take steps to a healthier lifestyle.

What are a few ways you can make a big difference in your life?

  • Schedule a checkup with your health care provider for a well-woman visit. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant soon, this is a perfect time to schedule a preconception visit. You’ll want to be as healthy as possible before getting pregnant.
  • Keep tabs on how your mind and emotions are doing – are you stressed? sad? anxious? Your provider can help you figure out ways to manage all that life throws your way.
  • Make a grocery list before you go to the store – this will help you plan meals and avoid making unhealthy impulse purchases.
  • Take advantage of the nice weather! Go for a walk or bike ride.
  • Are you a smoker? You can get help to quit – ask your provider for resources or call 1-800-Quit-Now.

Small steps can lead to big changes

If making healthy changes feels overwhelming, take it one item at a time. This week, call your provider and make your well-woman appointment. Next week try to add on something else, like a 10 minute walk during lunchtime.

Small changes can lead to big leaps in getting to a healthier you. Take it day by day, and week by week.

 

Sharing Mommy Moments for Mother’s Day

Friday, May 12th, 2017

Family walking outdoorsMother’s Day is coming up this Sunday. Let’s take some time to share special moments and memories.

What are some meaningful memories you have of your mother?

Are you a mom? What are some of the most memorable moments with your child that you cherish?

Do you have any humorous stories that would be fun to share?

Here are a couple from me to start us off:

“Dinner’s ready! Wash your hands!” my mother calls. We all show up at the table and it’s obvious that my brother’s hands are not clean. “But I washed them!” he protested. “So why are they still dirty ?” my mother asks. He looks at his hands to see the dirt on the top of his hands (not on his palms) and says “Oh – I had to wash the top, too??”

When we got a new TV and I was having trouble figuring out how the remote control worked, my son picked up the remote and took over effortlessly. My daughter then turned to me and said “Mommy – you need to practice more!”

Here are some from my colleagues:

“Walk…don’t run” my mother said. I wish I had listened. I was so excited that “our” lake was frozen enough that I could ice-skate, so I started to run up the outside stairs from the lake to the house, and of course, slipped on the icy step and fractured my wrist.  No skating that season for me…

One great memory I have from growing up with my mom is her surprise lunches. Every day at school I would sit down and open my lunch box to see what she had put together for me. She always cut my peanut butter and jelly sandwiches into fun shapes and designs and often included a little love note. It was as if I was getting a hug from her all the way at school and it always put a big smile on my face.

What’s your mommy moment? Please share.

And to all moms and moms-to-be, have a wonderful Mother’s Day!

 

Thank you to all nurses!

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

Nurse holding babyIf your baby was in the NICU, you most likely spent a great deal of time with her team of nurses. Likewise, if you had a difficult pregnancy, a nurse was probably by your side assisting you the whole way.

Nurses are critical in the care of mothers and babies. Many families who have had a baby born prematurely or with a health condition have told us just how fantastic the nursing staff was at their hospital. Nurses are hardworking, compassionate, highly educated professionals who work around the clock to ensure that you and your baby get the care you need.

In honor of National Nurse’s Week we want to thank all of the nurses that have impacted March of Dimes’ families. In particular, we wish to congratulate the four nurses who won the March of Dimes Graduate Nursing Scholarship Awards.

To recognize and promote excellence in nursing care of mothers and babies, the March of Dimes offers several $5,000 scholarships annually to registered nurses enrolled in graduate programs of maternal-child nursing. The March of Dimes Dr. Margaret C. Freda Graduate Nursing Scholarship Award was established in 2016 to honor long-time March of Dimes National Nurse Advisory Council Chair, volunteer, and friend, Dr. Margaret Comerford Freda. This award is given each year to the highest scoring graduate nursing scholarship applicant. Congratulations to our winners!

Did you have an amazing nurse that took care of you or your baby? How did he or she impact your NICU stay?

Share your story and help us thank all nurses for their unending dedication and incredibly hard work.

 

Prevent syphilis in your baby

Monday, May 8th, 2017

doctorCongenital syphilis (present at birth) can cause serious lifelong health conditions, or even death, for a baby. Unfortunately, the number of congenital syphilis cases in the United States increased 46 percent between 2012 and 2015.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD), also known as a sexually transmitted infection (STI). You can get it by having unprotected sex with someone who is infected with syphilis. You can also get it by having direct contact with an infected person’s syphilis sore which may be on a person’s lips, in their mouth or on their genitals.

If a woman has syphilis and gets pregnant, she needs to be treated for syphilis. If she doesn’t receive treatment, syphilis can pass to her baby.

The good news is that congenital syphilis is preventable:

  1. Protect yourself first. Either don’t have sex or have safe sex by using a condom or other barrier method.
  2. Go to all your prenatal care checkups; your provider will test you for syphilis.
  3. If you have syphilis, your provider will begin treatment. The sooner you receive treatment, the less likely you and your baby may have complications from the infection.
  4. Ask your partner to be tested (and treated) for syphilis, so that you don’t get infected or re-infected.

If you’re not sure whether you have syphilis, or think you may have been exposed to it, contact your healthcare provider.

See our article for more details about protecting yourself and your baby from syphilis. Our article includes diagnosis and treatment information, too.

If you have questions, text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Allergies and pregnancy – can you get relief safely?

Monday, May 1st, 2017

allergies2It seems that everyone I know is struggling with allergy symptoms right now. The chief complaints are itchy eyes, sneezing, congestion, and generally feeling like a marshmallow invaded your head. Spring looks so beautiful but taking a deep breath outside can make you miserable!

There are many over-the-counter remedies and prescription medications available to help with symptoms, but if you’re pregnant it may not be wise to use any of them.

Here’s the low-down…

Pros and cons of possible allergy relief remedies during pregnancy

First of all, check with your health care provider before you take any over-the-counter medicine, supplement or herbal product to make sure it’s safe for you and your baby. Your provider will weigh the risks and benefits of taking any medication during pregnancy.

  • As a general rule, nasal saline (salt water) is good to use as it keeps your nasal passages moist and helps you blow away the allergens that accumulate in your nose. Avoid nasal steroids though, unless prescribed by your prenatal provider.
  • Decongestants, such as pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine, usually should be avoided, especially during the first trimester, as there is a possible association between its use and certain birth defects in babies. There are too many brand name decongestants to list here. Your best bet is to ask your prenatal provider about a medication before you take it.
  • Antihistamines, such asdiphenhydramine, doxylamine and chlorpheniramine, block your reaction to an allergen. You may know them by their brand names, such as Benadryl, Nytol, Unisom, Triaminic, and others. Some are considered safe to use during pregnancy, with the ok of your provider.
  • Read labels. Many symptom relief medications contain more than one ingredient. Also, these meds are meant for short-term, not long-term use. Your prenatal provider is the perfect person to ask if/when/how long you should be on any particular medication.

How about allergy tests and shots?

  • If you’re thinking about being tested for allergies, either test before you become pregnant, or wait until after your baby is born. Allergy skin testing is not done during pregnancy due to a small risk that a severe reaction can occur. Reactions such as hives, swelling of your tongue and throat and even loss of consciousness may occur. During pregnancy, a severe reaction may be harmful to your baby.
  • If you are currently receiving allergy shots (known as immunotherapy), be sure you let your allergist know you are pregnant or hoping to become pregnant. He may decide to continue the shots, adjust your dosage or stop them entirely during your pregnancy.

Other suggestions

  • Decreasing exposure to allergy triggers is key in helping you breathe easier. Some allergy healthcare providers recommend keeping windows and doors shut and running an air conditioner to keep the indoor air as free from outdoor allergens as possible. You may find it helpful to run a small air purifier in the bedroom at night to help you sleep.
  • Breathing steam or taking a warm shower may also help to decongest your nasal passages.

Bottom line

Every woman and every pregnancy is different; your provider will know the remedy that is best for you. The good news is that once you give birth, you will have more options available to you to combat Mother Nature’s pollen parade.

Have questions? If you are wondering about taking a specific medication during pregnancy or while breastfeeding, you can text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Join the blog-a-thon for NIIW

Wednesday, April 26th, 2017

niiw-blog-a-thon-badgeThis week is National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), a time to talk about vaccines.

Do you remember mumps? How about chicken pox? For so many children, these are diseases they never had or will never get. But I remember them well – the incredible pain and swelling from mumps, the constant itching and scars from chicken pox, not to mention the many days of school that I missed. I knew kids who were hospitalized due to complications from both mumps and chickenpox.

Even my kids had chicken pox – one more severely than the other – as the vaccine was not yet available. How I wish they could have avoided that disease!

Rotavirus is another potentially very serious condition that most babies and children can avoid today. My daughter ended up in the hospital for two days due to complications from rotavirus – a very scary experience!

But perhaps the one that hits home the most for me is polio. The March of Dimes would not be here if it were not for this devastating disease. When President Franklin D. Roosevelt contracted this paralyzing disease, he called on our organization to raise money in order to fund research to develop a vaccine. The March of Dimes is named for the dimes that were “marched” to Washington from countless people to fund research into finding a vaccine in time to spare any more men, women, children and babies from getting this crippling disease.

We were successful. The polio vaccine was rolled out to the public in 1955 as a result of the pioneering work of March of Dimes’ funded researchers Drs. Salk and Sabin.

Due to the development of this vaccine, polio is practically a part of world history. It no longer exists in America, and is almost totally eradicated in other parts of the world. When you stop to think about it, that is really AMAZING. This little vaccine prevents lifelong paralysis and pain in millions of people.

What started with combating polio has led March of Dimes to continue working hard to ensure all babies get a fighting chance for a healthy start in life.

But vaccines are not just for babies

As important as it is for babies and children to receive their vaccines, it’s also critical that adults who come in contact with children stay up-to-date with immunizations. For example, pertussis (whooping cough) can be fatal for a baby. When parents and caretakers get the vaccine, they are ensuring that their baby will be protected until he is old enough to be immunized. In fact, it is so important to get this vaccine that all pregnant women are recommended to receive the Tdap vaccine during each pregnancy.

There’s no doubt about it -even adults need vaccines. And women need them before, during and after pregnancy.

It would be a very different world without the lifesaving vaccines that have spared us from so many diseases. NIIW is a time to highlight the importance of protecting babies and children from vaccine-preventable diseases and to celebrate the achievements of immunization programs in the U.S.

We’re a healthier nation and world because of them.

Please share your support for childhood immunizations by participating in this week’s blog-a-thon. Here are the details.

 

Zika Care Connect website offers access to specialists

Monday, April 24th, 2017

Mom & BabyA new website has been created specifically to help families affected by the Zika virus. It’s called Zika Care Connect (ZCC).

ZCC offers a network of specialized healthcare providers who can care for families potentially affected by the Zika virus.

Developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with March of Dimes, the ZCC features resources for families as well as healthcare providers.

Through the ZCC, parents and providers can locate and find specialists to provide the unique care a pregnant woman or a baby with Zika needs.

ZCC helps pregnant women and parents of Zika affected babies (patients):

  • find services and providers in their location who take their insurance and speak their language;
  • find resource tools such as fact sheets and Zika checklists;
  • get answers to questions through a HelpLine as well as the FAQ page.

All ZCC network healthcare providers can:

  • stay up to date on the most recent clinical guidance issued by the CDC in order to manage and care for patients with the Zika virus;
  • receive patient resource tools including downloadable materials;
  • make and receive referrals to/from other providers within the ZCC network.

Why is the ZCC important to babies affected by Zika?

It is important that babies born to a mother who tested positive for Zika be evaluated thoroughly after birth, and regularly as they grow. Some babies do not show signs of being infected with the virus at birth, but they may have developmental problems as they get older. This is why babies need to be continuously monitored. If they need specialty care, it is important that affected babies receive help as soon as possible.

If a baby is born with a Zika-related birth defect, developmental delay or disability, parents may feel overwhelmed by their baby’s complex medical needs. They will require support and guidance as their baby receives medical care from multiple providers. Healthcare providers need to work closely with one another and the family, to monitor the baby’s development and coordinate care.

The ZCC can help parents and specialists by providing resources and a network of healthcare providers, all in one place.

Check out the Zika Care Connect website:  www.zikacareconnect.org.

Call the ZCC Helpline 1-844-677-0447 (toll-free), Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm EST, to get answers to questions and get referrals to healthcare providers.

With ZCC, pregnant women and families may now get the medical help and support they need.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Can sleep affect your child with special needs? Or you?

Friday, April 21st, 2017

dad-and-daughter-asleep

Quick answer…YES. Sleep is more than, well, sleep. It is restorative and essential to a healthy life. It is as important as water, food and air. For a child with special needs, it can make the difference between an “okay day” and a horrible one.

What does sleep do for your child?

A study in Pediatrics revealed that “Children with non-regular bedtimes had more behavioral difficulties…Having regular bedtimes during early childhood is an important influence on children’s behavior.”

Non-regular bedtimes can disrupt your child’s behavior because it interferes with a body’s circadian rhythms (sleep cycle). It may also result in sleep deprivation, which may then negatively affect the part of the brain responsible for regulating behaviors. But, when children with non-regular bedtimes changed to regular bedtimes, parents reported positive changes in their behaviors. (Yay!)

Sleep also helps a person…

• get to and maintain a healthy weight

• stay healthy (you get sick less frequently)

• grow (if you are a baby, child or teen)

• lower your risk of high blood pressure and diabetes

• boost your mood

• think clearly, be more focused, and sharp

All of these benefits will allow your child to feel happier, do better at school, avoid injuries and be at his best – and that includes being better behaved.

For adults, the benefits are the same, making you more efficient at work, more energetic, less likely to make mistakes, and able to maintain a positive outlook. It also helps you to maintain patience – something needed when you are dealing with babies, children or teenagers, with or without special needs.

How much sleep do you really need?

• newborns need 16 -18 hours of sleep each day

• preschoolers need 11-12 hours per day

• school-aged kids need at least 10 hours

• teens need at least 9 hours of sleep each night

• adults need about 7-8 hours of sleep each night (some people need more, some less).

Note the words “at least,” as there are many kids who need much more sleep in order to function properly, depending on their lifestyle and medical condition.

What happens if you don’t get enough sleep?tired-family-in-car3

Children and teens need sleep to help their bodies grow. Cells regenerate at night during sleep. By not getting enough sleep, the hormone balance in a child will be thrown off. Without adequate sleep, a child’s immune system will have a harder time fighting off germs and diseases.

If you don’t get enough sleep, your “sleep debt” will increase to a point when you will need to make up for the lost sleep. If you do not get the sleep you need, your body won’t operate as it should. Your judgment and reaction times will be negatively affected. This can be dangerous for adults, especially if you are caring for an infant or child, or you are driving a car. Lack of sleep and driving is risky – it is as dangerous a combination as drinking alcohol and driving!

Where can you get more info?

For information on how to get a restful night’s sleep, sleep tips for children and adults, and when to see a doctor regarding possible sleep problems, see this handy guide.

If you are pregnant, you may have trouble finding a comfortable sleep position. Try sleeping on your left side with a pillow between your legs. Here are other tips.

Bottom line

Sleep is not a luxury; it is a necessity. By keeping a regular bedtime, your child’s health and behaviors may improve. Think of sleep as an essential nutrient (like a vitamin). Then, you may be able to make sleep one of the priorities in your life.

If you and your little one get the sleep you need, you will see and feel a positive difference.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org

For additional information on parenting a child with special needs, see our series on Delays and Disabilities.