Archive for the ‘Prematurity’ Category

New research links premature birth to mom’s risk of heart disease later in life

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

preemie and momThis headline has raised concerns among women who have had a premature baby (birth before 37 weeks) – and for good reason.

In a published study, researchers analyzed data from more than 70,000 women to look at the association between premature delivery and future cardiovascular disease (CVD). They found that women who delivered a baby before 37 weeks gestation in their first pregnancy had a 40 percent greater risk of heart disease later in life, compared to women with term deliveries. This finding occurred even after accounting for pre-pregnancy sociodemographic, lifestyle, and CVD risk factors.

And there’s more.

Women who delivered before 32 weeks gestation had double the risk of CVD later in life compared to women with term deliveries.

So what does this mean for moms who gave birth early?

The results from the study are concerning, but researchers have stated that premature delivery may be an early warning sign of future heart problems, but not the cause of them. Factors such as pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes, both of which can cause preterm labor, are already considered risk factors for future CVD. More research is needed to determine exactly how premature delivery and CVD are linked.

The March of Dimes funds research to help discover the causes of preterm labor and premature birth. In about half of cases, the cause is unknown. We hope that with our groundbreaking research, we will be able to help prevent premature birth and improve the health of mothers and babies throughout their lifetimes.

If you have questions or concerns about your future risk of CVD, speak with your health care provider.

Is breastfeeding a preemie different than a full term baby?

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

preemieThe answer is yes.

You’ve probably spent the last few months anxiously getting ready for your baby’s arrival. You’ve probably also thought about and decided how you are going to feed your baby after birth. Unfortunately, your breastfeeding plans may need to change in order to accommodate your baby, if you gave birth prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy).

Breastfeeding in the NICU

If your baby is in the NICU, you may need to start pumping to establish your milk supply. Although you won’t have your warm baby at your breast, give your baby any expressed colostrum or milk you produce. Breast milk provides many health benefits for all newborns, but especially for premature or sick babies in the NICU.

Read our tips and tricks to breastfeeding your baby in the NICU.

Late preterm babies

If your baby was born late preterm, between 34 weeks and 0 days and 36 weeks and 6 days of pregnancy,  the good news is that she may not need to spend any time in the NICU. The bad news is that breastfeeding a near-term baby can be very difficult. Late preemies are often very sleepy and lack the energy they need to latch, suck and swallow. Also, late preterm babies are vulnerable to hypothermia (low body temperature), hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), weight loss, slow weight gain and jaundice among other conditions, which may interrupt your breastfeeding progress.

Full term babies

Breastfeeding a full term baby has its challenges, too. But, compared to a preterm or late preterm baby, there are more opportunities to be successful with breastfeeding from the start, due to fewer health obstacles.

Stay positive

If your baby is spending time in the NICU or having trouble breastfeeding, the breast milk you provide your baby through expression or pumping is very beneficial to his growth and protection from illness and infection. Seek help when you need it through a Lactation Consultant, a nurse or your health care provider. If you are in the hospital, ask your nurse if they have a support group where you can connect and share with other moms going through the same situation.

Learn more in Breastfeeding 101.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

New study offers clues as to why some women give birth prematurely

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

research_birthdefectsresearch_rdax_50Why do some women give birth early and others don’t? March of Dimes researchers are trying to find the answer to this question. A new study has revealed important clues.

The type of bacteria found in a woman’s cervix and vagina during pregnancy may either increase the risk of premature birth or protect against it.

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Maryland collected cervicovaginal (CV) bacteria from 2,000 women at three different times during their pregnancies. They then analyzed the bacteria. They found that some of the bacteria actually lowered the risk of spontaneous preterm birth. But other types of bacteria increased the chance of preterm birth significantly. The bacteria associated with spontaneous preterm birth, either providing a protective effect or increasing risk, were different between African-American and non-African-American women.

If the study is confirmed, it could mean that targeting CV bacteria may be a new therapy to prevent premature birth. Edward R.B. McCabe, MD, PhD, senior vice president and chief medical officer of the March of Dimes, stated, “From these data, we may learn how to prevent preterm birth either by eliminating the CV bacteria that are associated with an increased risk and/or by enhancing the presence of protective bacteria. This is a promising new area that should become a research priority.”

Learn more about how March of Dimes researchers are working to better understand the causes of premature birth on our website.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Parent navigators – a lifeline for NICU moms and dads

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

Preemie on oxygen.jpg resizedIf you’re the parent of a baby born prematurely, you know the stress and anxiety that is a part of having your baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care unit (NICU).  Even if the entire NICU staff is super supportive and answers your every question, you may still feel like you’re on an ocean in a life raft without oars or directions. The feeling can be overwhelmingly scary.

Then, once your baby is discharged from the NICU, you may begin a whole new journey of medical visits, specialists, therapies, and figuring out the complex world of health insurance. If your baby has special healthcare needs, these next steps may be confusing at best.

Enter Parent Navigation Programs. These are programs designed to assist parents of children with special healthcare needs. The hook is that parents are assisting parents. The parent navigators have been in their shoes, as they have children with special healthcare needs.

One of our NICU Family Support Partner hospitals, Children’s National Health System in Washington D.C., employs parent navigators to provide support to parents of children with complex medical conditions. They help the parents of newly diagnosed babies or young children navigate the complicated healthcare system to get the care their child needs and to access vital community resources. And, perhaps the best part is that these parent navigators provide the emotional support that only another parent of a special needs child can fully understand.

Children’s National started their Parent Navigator Program in 2008, and is now launching a new program aimed specifically towards parents of newborns in the NICU. These babies may be born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), with complex medical conditions and/or with birth defects.

“This short-term, peer-to-peer “buddy” program looks to decrease stress, anxiety and depression in mothers of NICU babies during hospitalization” says Michelle Jiggetts, MD, MS, MBA, Program Administrator of the Complex Care Program and the Parent Navigator Program at Children’s National.

The success of this new program will be measured scientifically, by looking at the differences between parents who leave the NICU with a parent navigator, and those who do not. They will measure caregiver stress, anxiety and depression, as well as the amount of healthcare services a baby uses after leaving the NICU. The hope is that the group that had the benefit of a parent navigator for a year following their baby’s hospital discharge, will fare better overall – both parents and baby. You can learn more about this unique program, here.

According to Dr. Jiggetts, the parent navigator’s role is to:

  1. Provide peer-to-peer mentoring and support
  2. Link families to community resources and support groups
  3. Coach parents to be active partners and communicate effectively with health care providers
  4. Suggest useful tools (e.g. care notebooks) to help organize medical information
  5. Help families navigate the healthcare system and insurance issues
  6. Encourage families to focus on self-care

It seems like a no-brainer that a program like this will be incredibly helpful. As we all know, babies don’t come with instruction manuals, and infants with special healthcare needs have their own intense challenges. Having a peer “buddy” available to provide the low-down each step of the way must be a life-line that any parent would appreciate, but especially a parent of a preemie or baby with a health condition.

Even though you’re in a life raft on that ocean, you’ve now been given oars and a compass, and land is in sight.

 

Three quarters of a century young (yes – we’re 79 years old!)

Monday, December 19th, 2016

fdr-warm-springs-kidsIt’s that time of year, when magazines are full of stories and photos of the year in review, and people look back to take stock of their accomplishments. This post is taking it a step further…here is a celebration of our past 79 years!

Why the dimes? (we get this question a lot)

The March of Dimes was started in 1938 when Franklin Roosevelt’s personal struggle with polio led him to create the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. It was a time when polio was on the rise nationwide. The name for the fundraiser “March of Dimes” was coined by comedian and radio personality Eddie Cantor as a pun on a popular movie newsreel of the era, The March of Time. Cantor asked his radio audience to send dimes to the White House to help polio patients and support research. After billions of dimes were received, the organization became known as the March of Dimes. The end result of this effort was the development of the polio vaccines, which have almost completely rid the world of this disabling disease.

check in boxIt is very unusual for a nonprofit organization to fulfill its mission as completely as that of the March of Dimes. So, when the March of Dimes checked off the box on the successful development of the Salk and Sabin polio vaccines, we turned our focus to that of preventing birth defects and infant mortality. With thousands of birth defects on record, we’ve had our hands full.

Our work after polio

The March of Dimes has funded research looking for the underlying genetic causes of birth defects to help us better understand what can go wrong and hopefully how to prevent them. We’ve funded research into the development of surfactant therapy to treat breathing problems in premature infants, which has saved thousands of lives since 1990. We’ve successfully championed and promoted newborn screening so that more infants with devastating conditions are identified and treated in a timely manner; and we led the campaign to add folic acid to grain foods in the United States, thereby reducing serious birth defects of the brain and spine by 27%.

We began educating the public on how to have a healthy pregnancy by producing a robust website of articles, print materials, this blog, and using social media to help women understand what they can do to have a full-term, healthy baby. We began answering individual health questions from the public in 1996 and still continue to answer thousands of questions every year.

But we didn’t stop there.

Our work with babies, birth defects and infant mortality provided a natural transition into fighting premature birth, the number 1 cause of deathPassing the time while your baby is in the NICU among babies in the U.S. Nearly 1 in 10 babies is born prematurely. Despite the advances in neonatal medicine, many babies still die, and the ones who survive often face a lifetime of disability – from mild to severe. In short, it is simply something that we knew we needed to fight.

So, in 2003 we launched our Prematurity Campaign. And in 2011, we launched the first of five prematurity research centers, each one staffed by the best and brightest scientists, and each one focused on a different aspect of prematurity. The best part of this 5-pronged approach is that the researchers all talk to one another and collaborate, encouraging synergy. Our goal is to be as successful with ending prematurity as we were with eliminating polio.

We also continued in the quest to allow folic acid to be added to corn masa flour in the U.S., and…drum roll please…we were successful this year! This is very important for the Hispanic community as corn masa flour is a staple for many Hispanic families. Fortifying corn masa flour products such as tortilla chips, tacos, and tamales, with folic acid will help prevent more devastating neural tube birth defects like Spina Bifida.

Wait…there’s more…

In the meantime, another related mission has surfaced – stopping the Zika virus. The devastating effects that Zika can have on a developing baby are well documented (microcephaly, congenital Zika syndrome, and developmental delays).

The March of Dimes led a coalition of almost 100 organizations to educate Congress about the dangers of Zika and was successful in the passage of federal funding to combat the virus. We continue to raise awareness with our #ZAPzika campaign to let women know how to protect themselves. By working with the CDC, we‘re educating the public about this virus so that pregnant women can protect themselves and their babies from Zika.

Yes. We’ve been very busy. The past 78 years have gone by quite fast.

Is there anything else in our future? Glad you asked!

A new March of Dimes President.

With the start of 2017, we will be under the leadership of President, Stacey D. Stewart, MBA, a woman of experience, intelligence, creativity and integrity. We’re so excited to welcome her.

The mission of the March of Dimes is to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.

We are confident that under the leadership of Ms. Stewart, we will once again check off the box on a mission accomplished.

 

 

Can the benefits of kangaroo mother care last into adulthood?

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

kangaroo-care-21Parents who have had a baby in the NICU are familiar with kangaroo care or skin-to-skin care. Kangaroo care is a way to hold your baby so that there is as much skin contact between you and your baby as possible. It has wonderful benefits for parents and preemies. A new study shows that the benefits of an intensive form of kangaroo care, kangaroo mother care (KMC), may last into adulthood.

Kangaroo mother care was initially developed in Bogota, Columbia in the late 1970s. It was initiated in response to a shortage of incubators and a high rate of severe hospital infections. KMC involves continuous skin-to-skin contact, exclusive breastfeeding (or nearly exclusive), and timely (early) discharge with close follow-up. At the time, this was a revolutionary idea and very different than the typical practice of limited parental access to premature and low-birthweight infants. From 1993-1996 a study was conducted to scientifically prove the benefits of kangaroo mother care. It found that the survival, growth, development, and other selected health-related outcomes were equal to or better than those of infants cared for in a traditional manner.

The same researchers have now done a follow-up study of these children to see if the benefits of KMC have lasted into adulthood. They again compared the groups who had kangaroo mother care vs. traditional care. The researchers found that the KMC group had “significant, long-lasting social and behavioral protective effects 20 years after the intervention.” They were less aggressive, less impulsive, and less hyperactive than the group that did not receive KMC.

More studies are needed to help better understand how KMC influences long-term outcomes. But we know that kangaroo care has immediate benefits for both parents and babies while they are in the NICU. Kangaroo care may help your baby:

  • Keep his body warm
  • Keep his heart rate and breathing regular
  • Gain weight
  • Spend more time in deep sleep
  • Spend more time being quiet when awake and less time crying
  • Have a better chance of being able to breastfeed

And, kangaroo care may help you:

  • Make more breast milk
  • Reduce your stress
  • Feel close to your baby

Kangaroo care can be beneficial, even if your baby is connected to machines. Whatever your situation, kangaroo care is a precious way to be close to your baby.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Looking for a reason to get a flu shot? Here are 10 good ones.

Monday, December 5th, 2016

DoctorPregnant_zps3ac96800Many myths abound about whether a flu shot is important. Here are 10 facts that should convince you that a flu shot is good for you and your family:

  1. Flu can be life threatening. Children younger than 5, and especially kids younger than 2 are at a higher risk of complications from flu.
  2. Children of any age with long term health conditions, including developmental disabilities, are at a higher risk of serious problems from flu.
  3. Children with neurologic conditions, and kids who have trouble with lung function, difficulty coughing, swallowing or clearing their airways can have serious complications from flu.
  4. Pregnant women can have consequences from flu that include miscarriage, preterm labor, premature birth or giving birth to a baby with a low birthweight. It’s safe to get a flu shot any time during pregnancy.
  5. Babies can’t get their own flu shot until they are at least 6 months of age. This is another reason why women should get a flu shot during pregnancy. The protection will pass to the baby when she is born.
  6. Since babies are at risk until they’re vaccinated, protect them by making sure the people around them are vaccinated – all caretakers, family members and relatives.
  7. Adults older than age 65 (grandparents!) can suffer serious consequences from the flu.
  8. You don’t get the flu from the flu shot. It is made up of inactivated (dead) flu virus. You may experience soreness at the injection site, have a headache, aches or a fever but these symptoms should go away within a day or two. The flu lasts much longer and is more severe.
  9. Aside from barricading yourself in a room all winter long (?!) the best way to protect yourself from flu is to get vaccinated.
  10. This year, the flu vaccines have been updated to better match circulating viruses. There are also different options available, including one for people with egg allergies. Your healthcare provider can advise you.

So, what are you waiting for? Go get protected!

Here’s more info about people at high risk of developing flu-related complications and answers to frequently asked questions can be found here.

Helping your baby thrive in the NICU

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

This video clip contains great information on nurturing your baby in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In the video, real NICU parents describe different ways to bond with your baby while in the hospital, including skin-to-skin or kangaroo care.

 

 

For more helpful information about caring for your baby in the NICU, please visit our website. Learn about resources and support that can help you and your family while your baby’s in the NICU. Also, you can go to Share Your Story, the March of Dimes online community for families to share experiences with prematurity, birth defects or loss.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Join in World Prematurity Day activities tomorrow

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

Light the world purple

The world will light up purple tomorrow to bring awareness to the problem of preterm birth.

Landmarks all over the world will be ablaze in purple to honor premature babies.

Tomorrow marks the 6th annual World Prematurity Day (WPD).

One in ten babies is born too soon. Premature birth is the leading cause of death in children under the age of five worldwide. Babies born too early may have more health issues than babies born on time, and may face long term health problems that affect the brain, lungs, hearing or vision. World Prematurity Day on November 17 raises awareness of this serious health crisis.

In New York City, the Empire State Building will be bathed in purple lights. State Capitol buildings in Alabama, Pennsylvania and Tennessee will light up purple, too.Here are just a few more places where World Prematurity Day will be glowing:

  • Birmingham Zoo, AL;
  • Union Plaza Building (downtown skyline), Little Rock, AR;
  • All 5 river bridges spanning the Arkansas River;
  • Hippodrome Theater, Gainesville, FL;
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH;
  • Howard Hughes Corporation Building, Honolulu, HI;
  • Power & Light Building, Kansas City, MO;
  • Biloxi Lighthouse, MS;
  • Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA;
  • The Auxilio Mutuo Hospital, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico.

What can you do?

Share your story and video about babies born too soon here on our blog, as well as on Facebook.

Get decked out in purple tomorrow, take a photo and post it to social media with #worldprematurityday and #givethemtomorrow.

Together, we can honor the 380,000 babies born too soon each year in the U.S.

Together, we can let people know that 15 million babies are born too soon around the world every year, and that 1 million of them won’t live to their first birthday.

Together, we can change the face of premature birth and give every baby a fighting chance.

Please join us tomorrow, to raise your voice.

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Sometimes, love comes early – Pampers is offering a touch of love for those who do

Monday, November 14th, 2016

Kangaroo care Skin-to-Skin-223x300Today we welcome guest blogger Amy Tally, Senior Scientist, Pampers Hospital Diaper Development, P&G.

At Pampers, we believe every touch of love matters to the health and development of babies, especially the most vulnerable ones. That is why we’ve joined forces with the March of Dimes under the Pampers Touches of Love campaign this fall to celebrate all babies, especially those in the NICU, and those who care for them.

As part of this campaign, through World Prematurity Day on November 17, we’re asking everyone to show us all the ways that you give babies touches of love (from a hand hold or kiss on the forehead to wrapping your baby in a blanket chosen especially for her or him). For every #touchesoflove moment shared with @Pampers on Twitter & Facebook and @PampersUS on Instagram, we’ll make a $1 donation to the March of Dimes.*

One of the main reasons for our Touches of Love campaign was to underscore the importance of another major development from Pampers. We’ve worked closely with hospitals, pediatricians and nurses for 40 years, and as my colleagues and I met with hundreds of nurses over the past three years, they shared that current preemie diapers do not properly fit the smallest premature babies, and they were having to cut or fold the diaper or improvise ways to make it fit.

This is why we recently introduced our smallest diaper yet – the new Pampers Preemie Swaddlers Size P-3 diaper– because of all the challenges faced by babies who are born prematurely, a properly fitting diaper shouldn’t be one of them. Designed in partnership with NICU nurses, this diaper caters to the unique needs of babies weighing as little as one pound (500 grams) – to offer them a small touch of love. From the narrow core which offers Pampers excellent protection and allows their legs to lay comfortably and be optimally positioned, to the Absorb Away Liner™ that pulls away wetness and loose stools, a common side effect of antibiotics that premature babies are given, the new size P-3 diaper was created with the care and comfort of these tiny, premature babies at the forefront every step of the way. These size P-3 diapers are currently available in select hospitals in the United States, and will be available to hospitals across the U.S. and Canada before the end of 2016.

Being part of the development team, I can tell you that the creation of the new Pampers Preemie Swaddlers P-3 diapers was truly a labor of love. We wanted to make sure that our new diaper wrapped the tiniest babies in a gentle, loving touch because we understand that for premature babies, touch is not only a sign of love, but also a catalyst for survival and growth.

*Up to a maximum of $5,000. In addition, Pampers has made a donation of $100,000 in support of the Touches of Love campaign.

The March of Dimes does not endorse specific brands or products.