Archive for the ‘Mommy’ Category

Reduce the risk of SIDS in your baby

Monday, October 5th, 2015

back to sleepEach year 3500 infants die suddenly and unexpectedly in the U.S. These deaths are called sudden unexplained infant deaths (SUID). Most of them happen while the infant is sleeping in an unsafe environment.

SUIDs are reported as one of three types of infant deaths:

  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
    SIDS is the sudden death of an infant less than one year of age that cannot be explained. It can happen without warning to a baby who seems healthy. One reason a baby is more likely to die of SIDS is if he is  born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) or with low birthweight (less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces).
  • Unknown cause
    This is the death of an infant less than one year of age that cannot be explained because an investigation was not conducted. Therefore, cause of death could not be determined.
  • Accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed
    Suffocation can occur if an infant is put to sleep on soft bedding or a pillow. It can also happen when a person rolls on top of an infant or when he becomes wedged between two objects such as a mattress and the bed frame. Strangulation can happen when an infant’s head and neck become caught between two objects such as crib railings.

What can you do?

October is Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Awareness Month. It is important to understand your baby’s individual risk factors, and learn safe sleep strategies including:

  • ALWAYS, put your baby to sleep on her back, in a crib without bumpers, blankets, stuffed toys or loose bedding.
  • Do not smoke. Babies of parents who smoke are more likely to die of SIDS than other babies.
  • Give your baby a pacifier for naps and at bedtime.
  • There are many myths about SIDS – learn the facts.
  • Place your baby in her own bassinet or crib to sleep near your bed, but do not share the same bed. 

The good news is that SUIDs has significantly declined – from 130.3 deaths per 100,000 in 1990 to 39.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2013 – as a result of safe sleep messaging. See the American Academy of Pediatrics’ safe sleep recommendations and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Safe to Sleep campaign.

Have questions? Text or email us at

Before Rover meets Junior

Monday, September 28th, 2015

Bella sleepingAs you bring your baby home from the hospital for the first time, you want to keep her safe and healthy around your pet. You may feel anxious about how your pet will respond to your family’s newest addition.

Here are some tips to think about before bringing your baby home.


Before your baby comes home

  • If you are still pregnant, it may be helpful to teach your dog some basic obedience skills, which will help his behavior when your baby comes home. Introduce new rules as needed. If you don’t want your dog on the furniture, or to jump on you when you walk in the door as you hold your baby, introduce that rule now.
  • Your schedule will drastically change once your baby is home and you may not be able to feed or walk your pet when he expects. Try changing your pet’s feeding or walking schedule beforehand. For example, if you regularly feed your pet at 7am sharp, try feeding him at a different time in the morning. Or it may be easier to purchase an automatic feeder which will dispense food at a certain time every day.
  • Take a piece of clothing or a blanket with your baby’s scent on it and put it in your pet’s bed so he can get used to the smell.

Once you and your baby are discharged

  • Have everyone else go in the door first so your pet can express his excitement at seeing people. Then put a leash on him just in case he does not have a good first reaction to your baby.
  • Slowly introduce your pet to your baby. Try holding your baby and allowing your pet to sniff her feet to get her scent.
  • Never leave your pet unsupervised near your baby.
  • Keep your pet out of your baby’s sleeping area to reduce the risk of hair or pet allergens irritating your baby’s airway.
  • Once your baby is old enough to lie outside of her crib, place her on a blanket or mat to keep pet fur and dust from irritating your baby during playtime. Keep your pet away from your baby during floor time.
  • Watch for aggressive behavior from your pet. Get help from an animal behavior expert if you see your pet acting out toward your baby.

Health Benefits

Besides your pet being a loving companion, some research suggests that a baby living in a home with a dog has fewer colds, ear infections and the need for antibiotics in their first year of life than babies raised in pet-free homes. The research suggests that homes with cats may have health benefits for babies too. However, researchers think that dogs provide more exposure to dirt and allergens, which strengthen a baby’s immune system.


Although there may be health benefits, you need to keep the negative health effects in mind, too. Furry pets and even short-haired animals are the most common and powerful causes of allergy symptoms. And cats tend to be more allergenic than dogs. My brother was mildly allergic to our dog, but he loved him so much that my parents did not want to give away our dog. We made sure to brush our dog’s fur often and vacuum frequently to decrease my brother’s exposure to the allergens.

If your child has an allergy to your pet, keep the animal out of her bedroom, sweep, dust and vacuum frequently. You can also fit your forced-air heating or air-conditioning system with a central air cleaner, which will remove a lot of the pet allergens from your home. If you are not sure whether your pet is the cause of your child’s allergy, ask your child’s pediatrician about allergy testing.

Do you have any tips to share? How did it go when you brought your baby home?

Have questions? Text or email us at A Health Education Specialist is available to answer your questions.

It’s time to get your flu shot…again

Friday, September 25th, 2015

midwife with pregnant womanInfluenza (also called flu) is a serious disease. It’s more than just a runny nose and sore throat. The flu can make you very sick, and it can be especially harmful if you get it during and right after pregnancy. Flu season is fast approaching and it’s time to schedule your flu shot now.

Who needs a flu shot?

Everyone 6 months and older should get an annual flu vaccine. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop full protection against the flu. Getting the flu vaccine is especially important for children over 6 months, children with special needs, pregnant women and other high-risk groups.

I got a flu shot last year, why do I need another one?

Flu viruses change every year, so just because you got a flu shot last year, doesn’t mean that you are protected this year. The flu shot is designed to protect against the flu viruses that are predicted to be the most common during the flu season. Also, immunity from vaccination decreases after a year. This is why everyone needs a flu vaccine every season.

Are flu shots safe for pregnant women?

YES! All women who are pregnant should get a flu shot. It is safe to get the flu shot during pregnancy and it will protect you and your baby from serious health problems during and after pregnancy. However, remember that if you’re pregnant, you should not get the flu mist. It’s not safe to use during pregnancy.

Why is the flu so harmful during pregnancy?

The flu can be dangerous during pregnancy because:

  • Pregnancy affects your immune system. During pregnancy your immune system doesn’t respond as effectively to viruses and illnesses. This means you are more likely to catch the flu.
  • You are more likely to have serious complications. Health complications from the flu, such as pneumonia and bronchitis, can be very serious and even deadly.
  • Pregnant women who get the flu are more likely to have preterm labor and premature birth (before 37 weeks).

Where can I get a flu shot?

You can get the vaccine from your health care provider. Many pharmacies and work places also offer it each fall. You can use the HealthMap Vaccine Finder to find where the flu vaccine is available in your area.

The flu shot is the best way to protect you and your baby from the flu. You can learn more at

Have any questions? Email or text us at


Benefits of breastfeeding

Monday, August 31st, 2015

sg_breastfeeding1Breast milk is the best food for your baby during the first year of life and we recommend exclusively breastfeeding for about the first six months. Your milk helps your baby grow healthy and strong and can protect him from many illnesses. How does your breast milk do this?

Breast milk…

• has hormones and the right amount of protein, sugar, fat and most vitamins to help your baby grow and develop.
• has antibodies that help protect your baby from many illnesses. Antibodies are cells in the body that fight off infection.
• has fatty acids, like DHA (docosahexanoic acid), which help support your baby’s brain and eye development. It may lower the chances of sudden infant death syndrome, also known as SIDS, too (SIDS is the unexplained death of a baby younger than 1 year old).
• is easy to digest. A breastfed baby may have less gas and belly pain than a baby who is fed formula.
• changes as your baby grows so he gets exactly what he needs at the right time. For example, for the first few days after giving birth, your breasts make a thick, yellowish form of breast milk called colostrum. Colostrum has nutrients and antibodies that your baby needs in the first few days of life. It changes to breast milk in 3 to 4 days.
• is always ready when your baby wants to eat. Your body makes as much breast milk as your baby needs. The more your baby breastfeeds, the more milk your body makes.

What if you are sick? Should you still breastfeed?

In most cases, yes, you should continue to breastfeed. The antibodies your body produces to fight off an illness will be passed to your baby through your milk and protect him. If you stop breastfeeding when you are sick, you will reduce your baby’s protection and even increase his chance of getting sick. If you feel a cold coming on, rest, drink plenty of fluids and keep on breastfeeding. If you are uncertain about whether to breastfeed while sick, ask your Lactation Consultant or baby’s pediatrician.

Read our blog to learn how to keep your breast milk safe and other helpful posts in Breastfeeding 101.

Have questions? Text or email us at We are here for you.

Keeping track of feedings and diapers

Monday, August 24th, 2015

Mom breastfeeding (2)Did you know the March of Dimes developed a breastfeeding log just for busy moms? We hope it will make it just a little easier to see if your baby is getting what he needs to grow and thrive.

Being a new mom can be tough. You have so many things to think about and remember while caring for your little one, such as which breast your baby last ate from or how many wet or soiled diapers he had today. But it is important to keep track of this information to make sure your baby is eating well and gaining enough weight.

The breastfeeding log can be used to track:

• Day and times of your baby’s feedings
• How long your baby feeds from each breast
• Which breast you started nursing from at each feeding (so you can begin the next feeding from the other breast).
• How much breast milk you pump
• Number of wet diapers or bowel movements per day
• Breastfeeding problems or concerns

Our breastfeeding log is especially helpful if your baby is in the NICU. You can track how often and how much milk you express. Many moms struggle to make breast milk when their babies are sick and it may take a few days of pumping before you produce enough milk. If you have trouble making enough breast milk, ask for help and support. A lactation consultant can use the information in your log to make sure you’re on the right track.

To ensure your baby is gaining enough weight, bring your log to each of your baby’s visits with his health care provider. If your baby is slow to gain weight, the breastfeeding log can help you and your baby’s provider spot and take care of feeding issues before they become a problem.

See other breastfeeding posts here.

Have questions? Text or email us at We are here to help.

Car seat recall

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

minivanBritax is recalling over 200,000 child car seats regarding concerns about the harness adjuster buttons.  According to the company’s website “certain ClickTight model convertible car seats may contain a defect with the harness adjuster button, which would pose a safety hazard. The harness adjuster button may remain down in the ‘release’ position after the harness is tightened. This will enable the shoulder harnesses to loosen from a child’s movements while secured in the seat. A loose harness may not adequately protect a child in the event of a motor vehicle crash.”

The voluntary safety recall includes certain Advocate ClickTight, Boulevard ClickTight, and Marathon ClickTight model convertible car seats manufactured between August 1, 2014 – July 29, 2015 with the following US model numbers: E9LT95Q, E9LT95Z, E9LT95N, E1A025Q, E9LT86F, E1A135Q, E9LT86G, E9LT85Q, E9LT86A, E9LT86H, E9LT85S, E1A015Q, E1A016A, E1A016H, E1A166F, E9LT87J, E1A116L, E9LT76P, E9LT71Q, E9LT76N, E9LT76B, E9LT75R, E9LT76L, E1A006B, E1A005R.

Britax is automatically mailing a free remedy kit to all registered owners of the recalled car seats within 7-10 business days of the announcement. The remedy kit includes one (1) non-toxic food-grade lubricant, a label indicating that the remedy has been completed, as well as an instruction sheet for applying the lubricant to the harness adjuster button (red).

Owners can confirm if their product is included in the recall by visiting or by verifying the model number and date of manufacture.

Questions? Text or email them to

Breastfeeding and hair treatments

Monday, August 17th, 2015

breastfeeding and hair treatmentsYou’ve given birth to your little peanut, congrats! You may be thinking that now you can finally return to some of the activities you enjoyed before becoming pregnant. For example, you may have stopped dying your hair during pregnancy. The fall season is around the corner and a new cut and color may be in order, but if you’re breastfeeding now, is it safe to head to the salon?

Hair treatments include hair coloring, curling (permanents), bleaching and straightening agents. Low levels of hair dye can be absorbed through the skin after application, and the dye is excreted into the urine.

But, according to the experts at Mother to Baby, “There is no information on having hair treatments during breastfeeding. It is highly unlikely that a significant amount would enter the breast milk because so little enters the mom’s bloodstream. Many women receive hair treatments while breastfeeding, and there are no known reports of negative outcomes.”

Despite this good news, if you are still hesitant, you might consider highlights or streaks, as the dye is not placed directly on the scalp.

If you have any questions about breastfeeding, speak with a lactation consultant or email us at We are happy to help!

Breastfeeding 101

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

If you’re breastfeeding or thinking about breastfeeding, you’ve come to the right place. This post is your one-stop-shop for all things breastfeeding. Stop in for a quick glance or stay for a while and browse the different blog posts below. We’ll keep adding new ones as they are published. If you have questions, email us at We are here to help.

• Breastfeeding myths debunked

Breastfeeding myths debunked part 2 

The do’s and don’ts of bottle-feeding 

• Breastfeeding your baby in the NICU can be challenging 

• Breastfeeding a baby with a cleft lip/palate  

• Breastfeeding and returning to work 

• Formula switching, what you need to know 

• Alcohol and breastfeeding 

• Breastfeeding on demand vs. on a schedule 

• Keeping breast milk safe

 “Can I continue breastfeeding now that I am pregnant again?”

• Breastfeeding and hair treatments

Keeping track of feedings and diapers

Benefits of breastfeeding


Thinking about maternity leave

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

pregnant woman with ipadHave you heard that Netflix is offering unlimited paid parental leave to their employees? During their first year as new parents, Netflix employees can take as much time off as they choose while still earning their normal salary. This is really an amazing policy. If you’re working and pregnant, you probably have thought a lot about maternity leave. Over the past 30 years, the participation rate in the labor force of women with children under age 3 has risen from 34.3% in 1975 to 60.9% in 2011. Half of all mothers work during pregnancy and return to work after their baby is born. And among women who worked during their pregnancy between 2005 and 2007, 58.6% returned to work 3 months after giving birth and 72.9% returned to work 6 months after giving birth. It is important to know what options are available to you so that you can plan ahead.

Under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) employees can take time off from work without pay for pregnancy- and family-related health issues. The act provides up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave per year. It also requires that you can keep your health insurance benefits during the leave. To qualify, you must have worked for your employer for at least 12 months, worked at least 1,250 hours during the last 12 months, and worked at a location where the company has 50 or more employees within 75 miles.

In addition to the FMLA leave, your employer may have its own maternity leave policies. Talk to your boss or someone from human resources (also called HR). Here are some questions you may want to ask:

  • Does your employer offer paid maternity leave? Some employers offer paid time off for the birth of your baby. Talk with someone from HR to find out if you have paid maternity leave.
  • Does your health insurance continue while you’re on maternity leave? If you get your health insurance through your employer, your HR person can tell you about what your insurance plan covers. You may need to change your health plan after your baby’s born to make sure he’s covered, too.
  • Does your employer offer flex time or telecommuting for when you’re ready to go back to work? For example, can you work fewer hours each week or work from home at the beginning? And then increase your hours or your time in the office little by little over a few weeks?
  • Are there other programs or services that your employer offers to new moms? If you’re breastfeeding, find out if your employer has a lactation room. This is a private space (not a bathroom) that you can use to pump breast milk. Employers with more than 50 employees must provide this space for breastfeeding moms.

Finally, choosing a child care provider that works best for you can be tough. Try to explore your options and finalize your plans before your baby arrives.  If you can organize childcare before you deliver, it will make your time at home with your baby more relaxing and enjoyable.

Breastfeeding in public is getting easier

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

Alcohol and BreastfeedingIf you are a mom who is breastfeeding your baby, you may feel that your social life is sometimes curtailed. Breastfeeding every two to three hours, can make it very difficult to go out to public places if you can’t find a clean, safe place to feed your baby when she is hungry.

Now, take me out to the ballgame just got a little bit easier.

Thanks to lactation rooms and breastfeeding pods which are popping up in all sorts of places, nursing moms can escape to a quiet, private place to breastfeed and not miss any of the fun.

Breastfeeding pods (portable enclosed spaces designed specifically for breastfeeding or expressing milk) are already at somebreastfeeding pod airports, making travel much easier for a mom on the go. They are also popping up at ball parks. Recently, Fenway Park in Boston, MA, added a breastfeeding pod, so baseball enthusiasts need never miss a game.

Before you head out of the house to a public place, call ahead and ask if they have accommodations for breastfeeding moms. You may not have ever noticed or seen a lactation room or pod at the venue. But if you know it is there, you may feel more comfortable bringing your baby along. You will enjoy yourself without missing a feeding. You can also go to the Mamava pod website or use their app to locate a pod.

Another option is to use the Moms Pump Here lactation room locator. It tells you where you can find quiet, clean, safe places to breastfeed or pump. Use their website or download their app for info on the go.

So much has changed from the days when women would breastfeed their babies in a ladies room (ugh) or worse yet – stay home and miss special events. With the known benefits of breastmilk, it is logical that more accommodations are being made for lactating moms, so that they can feed their babies when they are away from home.