Archive for the ‘Baby’ Category

World BD day gets word out globally

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

Sick babyThe twitter-sphere was all aglow yesterday for the first-ever World Birth Defects Day. In fact, 3,378,673 people were reached worldwide! Yup. It’s not a typo.

Twelve leading global organizations including the March of Dimes, along with scores of other foundations, hospitals, health care providers, government agencies, parents and individuals with birth defects took to Twitter to raise awareness. People in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, England, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Mexico, Mongolia, Netherlands, Panama, Philippines, Rwanda, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, Tanzania, Turkey, and individuals from all over the United States participated. As the day progressed, #worldbdday tweets continually popped up on my computer screen. In case you missed it, here is a snapshot of important messages.

Birth defects are surprisingly common

Did you know that every 4 ½ minutes a baby is born with a birth defect in the US?

In the US, about 1 in 5 babies die before their 1st birthday due to birth defects.

Birth defects affect 1 in 33 infants worldwide.

More than 8 million babies worldwide are born each year with a serious birth defect.

There are thousands of different birth defects, and about 70% of the causes are unknown.

The most common birth defects are heart defects, neural tube defects and Down syndrome.

In the US, a baby is born with a congenital heart defect every 15 minutes.

More than 300,000 major birth defects of the brain and spine occur worldwide each year.

Many birth defects are discovered after the baby leaves the hospital or within the 1st year of life.

More than 3.3 million children under 5 years of age die from birth defects each year.

Babies who survive & live with birth defects are at an increased risk for long-term disabilities & lifelong challenges.

Early intervention services may help babies w/ BDs; get your child help by starting early.

Birth defects are costly. Financial and emotional costs of birth defects take a toll on families and communities worldwide.

Learn how to decrease your risk of having a baby with birth defects

Taking folic acid before & early in pregnancy can help to reduce the risk for BDs of the brain & spine.

Smoking during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of certain BDs. It’s never too late to quit.

We can’t prevent all birth defects. We CAN prevent FASD! (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders)

FASDs are 100% preventable.

Alcohol can cause your baby to have BDs (heart, brain & other organs). Don’t drink if you are pregnant or trying to conceive.

Being overweight before pregnancy can increase the risk for some birth defects.

Not all BDs are preventable, but women can take steps toward a healthy pregnancy.

Make a PACT: plan ahead, avoid harmful substances, choose a healthy lifestyle, and talk to your doctor.

Raise awareness

Awareness of birth defects & the importance of care for children with these lifelong conditions is key.

The mission of the March of Dimes is to prevent birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.

March of Dimes has invested more than $50 million in birth defects research in the last 5 years.

Genetics has long been a main theme of March of Dimes research.

MOD grantees have discovered genes that cause or contribute to a number of common birth defects, including fragile X syndrome, cleft lip and palate, and heart defects.

These discoveries pave the way for treatments and preventions for these birth defects.

 

For more information, email AskUs@marchofdimes.org. See other topics in the series on Delays and Disabilities- How to get help for your child, here.

Caring for your baby’s teeth

Friday, February 27th, 2015

teethTooth decay is the most common preventable chronic disease among children in the United States. If left untreated, it can negatively affect a child’s physical and social development, as well as his school performance.

Did you know you can start to clean your baby’s teeth and gums as soon as he is born? Here are some tips from the American Dental Association (ADA):

• Before your baby has teeth, wipe the gums with a clean, moist gauze pad or washcloth.
• Most babies get their first tooth at around 6 months. It is important to remember that as soon as teeth appear, decay can occur. So once your baby has teeth, start brushing them.
• Use a soft-bristle toothbrush and ask your baby’s dentist if you should be using a toothpaste that contains fluoride.
• Teeth should be brushed twice per day (morning and night) or as directed by a dentist or health care provider. Once your child is old enough to brush on his own (or wants to give it a try) make sure you watch him closely.
• As soon as he has two teeth that touch, you can begin flossing daily.

Once your baby’s first tooth comes in, it is time to schedule a trip to the dentist. The ADA recommends that the first dental visit take place within six months after the first tooth appears, but no later than a child’s first birthday. Although the dentist will check your baby’s mouth, teeth, and gums, this visit is really more about getting your child comfortable with the dentist.

When it is time to schedule your child’s first dental appointment, you can ask your dentist if she sees children. If not, you can find a pediatric dentist who specializes in treating babies, children and teens. Also, all children enrolled in Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) have coverage for dental services – including check-ups, x-rays, fluoride treatments, dental sealants, fillings, and more. Check out your state’s complete list of dental benefits for children in Medicaid and CHIP.

You can read more about your baby’s dental health on our website. Starting healthy dental habits early will help protect your baby’s teeth for a lifetime.

March 3rd is the first ever World Birth Defects Day

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

WBDD_LogoFamilies frequently write to the March of Dimes and share a story about their child’s struggle with a birth defect. Often, they ask what else they can do to help raise awareness. Well, here is a great way to get involved.

Help us mark the first World Birth Defects Day by participating in social media activities and sharing a story about the impact of birth defects on you and your family.

The March of Dimes and 11 other international organizations, including the CDC and the WHO, have created the first-ever World Birth Defects Day on March 3rd. We hope to raise awareness of this serious global problem and advocate for more prevention, care and research to help babies and children.

Birth defects affect 1 in 33 infants worldwide. Half of these birth defects will be detected soon after birth; the other half will be diagnosed during the first year of life. Birth defects are a major cause of death in infants and young children. Babies who survive are at an increased risk for life-long disabilities.

We need you.

On March 3rd, share your story about the impact of birth defects on you, your child or someone you know. With our partners, we’ll be urging governments, non-governmental organizations, policymakers, researchers, and health care providers around the world to help us work together toward a healthier future for children.

What can you do?

1.  Post an announcement on your blog, Facebook, Twitter or other social media platform.

2.  Register to be a part of the World Birth Defects Day Thunderclap. A message will be sent out at 9:00 a.m. EST on March 3 to help raise awareness.

3.  Join the Buzzday on Twitter on March 3rd. Plan to send one or more messages using the #WorldBDDay tag at some point during the day. Retweet both promotional and day-of messages to build our buzz for the day.

We look forward to having you join the conversation. Together, we can make strides to improve knowledge and raise awareness.

For more information, email AskUs@marchofdimes.org. See other topics in the series on Delays and Disabilities- How to get help for your child, here.

Peanut allergies in children

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

Peanuts or no peanuts? That is the question many new parents ask themselves as they look at the ingredients in their baby’s food. When I started my babies on solid foods, I remember hovering over them for days at time, scanning every square inch of their skin to see if there was any sign of a food allergy. Over the last 10 years, the number of children with peanut allergies has doubled, causing many parents, like me, to wonder at what age is it OK to begin giving children foods made with peanuts.

A recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that giving your baby foods made with peanuts in the first year of life may actually help prevent peanut allergies later in life. The study involved over 600 babies and followed them until they reached age 5. These babies had a history of egg allergy or eczema, a condition that causes patches of dry, red and itchy skin. Some babies were given foods made with peanuts and other babies avoided these foods until they turned age 5. The study found that babies who were given foods made with peanuts were less likely to develop peanut allergies than babies who avoided these foods until they were older.

More research needs to be done to understand peanut and other kinds of food allergies. In the meantime, talk to your baby’s health provider if you have concerns about food allergies. As you start your baby on solid foods, give her one kind of food at a time and wait a few days before trying a new food. If your baby has signs of an allergic reaction, contact her health provider. Introducing new foods one at a time may help you find out which food caused an allergic reaction.

From NICU to EI services

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

preemie hand in adult handIf your baby was born prematurely or at a low birth weight, chances are he or she may benefit from Early Intervention (EI) services. EI services are designed to help your baby catch up developmentally. They can include speech, physical or occupational therapy, as well as other kinds of treatment.

Usually, the hospital NICU staff will give you the information to have your baby screened or evaluated so that services may begin soon after your baby gets home (if they are needed). But, parents – you should know that a doctor or hospital referral is not needed to start the process of requesting early intervention services. You can contact your state’s agency yourself. Although it is very helpful for hospitals to give parents all of the information they need to get services started early, a hospital referral is not a requirement for a screening.

Read this post on Early intervention for babies and toddlers to learn how to request a screening. In many cases, a phone call to your state’s early intervention program is all you need to initiate an evaluation (which is free of charge to you). EI services are available in every state and territory of the United States.

Don’t delay with delays. The sooner your baby gets help, the sooner he can start catching up. If you are concerned about your baby’s development, make the call, get the free screening, and put your mind at rest.

See other topics in the Delays and Disabilities series here.

Coughing, sniffling, and sneezing…oh my!

Monday, February 16th, 2015

baby_sickbabycareDid you know that by the time most babies are two years old they have had eight to ten colds? Colds in little ones can be very unpleasant. Coughing, sneezing, runny nose…all these symptoms can be more uncomfortable for a baby than for an older child or adult. A baby can’t blow her nose and has a hard time breathing through her mouth. And a stuffy nose can make it difficult for a baby to suck which can affect feeding.

Lots of times you may want to give your little one some over-the-counter medicine to help relieve her runny nose and cough. But it is important to remember that over-the-counter cold medicines can be dangerous for children under two and should not be used.

Colds are caused by viruses and can be spread through the air and on surfaces.  A child or adult can spread a cold directly through a sneeze or cough or indirectly through touching hands and surfaces. For instance, if an infected person coughs into their hand and then shakes someone else’s hand, and that person then touches their nose or mouth, they may catch the cold and the virus is spread.

As we all know, colds are a part of life, and unfortunately there is no treatment. Antibiotics will not cure a cold. Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections, not viruses. If your baby has a cold accompanied by a mild fever, a single ingredient fever-reducer (such as acetaminophen) can help. But over-the-counter combination medications that treat cold symptoms, such as coughing and runny nose, should not be used in children under age two. These medicines can cause life-threatening side effects in children under two. And according to the American Academy of Pediatrics “…several studies show that cold and cough products don’t work in children younger than six years and can have potentially serious side effects. In addition, keep in mind that coughing clears mucus from the lower part of the respiratory tract, and ordinarily there’s no reason to suppress it.”

So if your baby or child has a cold, what can you do to make her feel better? If your baby is having trouble sucking, try using a rubber suction bulb to help clear her nose before each feeding. Your health care provider may recommend saline (salt water) nose drops to help clear up stuffiness. A cool-mist humidifier in her room may also help—just make sure to clean and dry the humidifier each day to prevent mold and bacteria from developing.

Most children do not need to see a health care provider when they have a cold. However, if you have a baby three months or younger, you should call your pediatrician as soon as you notice any signs of illness. Check out our website for more information about when to call your baby’s provider. And remember, prevention is the best medicine—make sure to keep your infant away from people who are coughing and sneezing, and teach older children about washing hands and the best way to cough and sneeze.

Passing the time while your baby is in the NICU

Friday, February 13th, 2015

Passing the time while your baby is in the NICUIt may be difficult to know what to do with your time when your baby is in the NICU. Going home to an empty house may seem impossible. All you can think about is how your little one is doing. However, there are all kinds of productive things you can do, to pass the time until your baby is ready to come home.

While at the hospital

• Learn about your baby’s condition as well as what to expect on the NICU journey.
• Get to know your baby. As soon as your baby’s condition allows, take an active role in his care. Feed, hold, bathe, diaper and dress your baby. Learn about preemie cues to help you understand your baby’s behaviors.
• Room-in with your baby. Some hospitals (depending on your baby’s condition) will allow you to spend the night caring for baby. Ask your nurse if this is an option.
• Read to your baby
• Learn how to take care of your other children while your baby is in the NICU. See if they can visit your baby in the NICU.
• Is a holiday coming up? Read our blog on spending the holidays in the NICU for tips.

While at home

• Get the right car seat for your child.
• Prepare your home for your preemie.
• Make sure you have food in the house or ask a friend or relative to get some groceries for you. Eating healthy foods will help you maintain your energy.
• Keep up with your chores; ask a relative or friend to help if you need it.
• Visit our website for information on managing the NICU experience.

Relax and rejuvenate

• Put your feet up. You need to take care of yourself in order to be able to take care of your baby.
• Take a nap: Getting enough rest is important during this time.
• Be active.  A short 10 minute walk once or twice a day will be more beneficial to you than you can imagine. If you can manage a longer walk, go for it. Or, join a class (like Zumba) where you can dance off your frustrations as you have fun.
• Take a yoga, meditation or a stretch and tone class or use a DVD. You can take them out of a library for free. These classes combine getting in shape with learning to calm down. Believe it or not, most people need to learn how to relax.

While at home or by your baby’s side, seek support by visiting Share Your Story®, the March of Dimes online community for NICU families. You will be welcomed and comforted by other NICU moms who are or have been in your situation and know how you are feeling.

Do you have a baby in the NICU? Email us at Askus@marchofdimes.org with your questions. We are here to help.

Parenting your child with a heart defect

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

in the NICUWhen your baby has a heart defect, it is overwhelming, exhausting, emotionally draining, and beyond scary. Have I left any adjectives out?

Congenital (present at birth) heart defects (CHDs) affect 1 in 100 babies every year. These heart defects can affect the heart’s structure, how it works, or both. Did you know that congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects? Each year, about 40,000 babies are born with a heart defect in the U.S. The good news is that more and more children born with CHDs are living longer, healthier lives, due to medical advances.

Heart defects develop in the early weeks of pregnancy when the heart is forming. Severe congenital heart defects are usually diagnosed during pregnancy or soon after birth. Less severe heart defects often aren’t diagnosed until children are older. Depending on the heart defect, your child may or may not need active treatment. For example, some defects resolve on their own. However, there are heart defects that require more intensive treatment and care.

What is CCHD?

Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a group of the seven most severe congenital heart defects:  Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS); Pulmonary atresia (PA); Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF); Total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPV, or TAPVR); Transposition of the great arteries (TGA); Tricuspid atresia (TA); Truncus arteriosus.

About 1 in 4 babies born with a heart defect has CCHD, or about 4,800 babies in the U.S. every year. Babies with CCHD need treatment soon after birth – often within hours, days or months, depending on the severity of the condition. A baby with CCHD will need ongoing treatment from a pediatric cardiologist, a medical doctor with advanced training.

Your child with CCHD

Some babies with CCHD will receive surgery soon after birth, and others require subsequent surgeries as they get older. The treatment your child receives will depend on the type and severity of the defect. If your child has been diagnosed with CCHD, it is important to understand his disease and the treatment that is required. Ask your child’s pediatric cardiologist and pediatrician all of your questions. The doctor can tell you if your child’s activity should be encouraged or restricted, if your child needs antibiotic treatment before certain procedures, if your child requires extra calories (from food) to help maintain his health, if he needs physical therapy or other kinds of therapies.

Children with heart defects may be delayed in reaching their developmental milestones. Early intervention may help enable your child to make strides and catch up. Other children may develop a disability over time. The early intervention program is designed to be family centered – moms and dads receive help in parenting their child, and the child receives therapy to keep progressing. Early intervention, together with medical advances, are helping children with CCHD live richer, fuller lives.

You may need support

Parenting a child with a congenital heart defect involves a blend of vigilance, medical interventions, health advocacy and lots of love and patience. The March of Dimes’ online community, Share Your Story, is a place where parents of babies with heart defects as well as other birth defects or disabilities, can go to find support, comfort and information. There is nothing like the camaraderie of another parent who has walked in your shoes to help you through your journey.  Just log on and post a comment and you will be welcomed and supported.

Where can you learn more?

Visit our website to learn more about CCHD. We discuss the most common heart defects, how they are diagnosed and treated, as well as possible causes. You will also learn about screening tests your baby can have to determine if he has CCHD. Additional guidance on parenting a child with a heart defect is available on the CDC website.

For more information about any of the heart defects listed above, contact us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org and we will be happy to help. To see similar posts in the Delays and Disabilities series, click here.

 

 

 

 

Does your baby have the right car seat?

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

rear-facing car seatFinding the right car seat can be a challenge. There are so many different kinds and sizes, how do you know which car seat is right for your child’s age and weight? What should you do if you have a baby born prematurely? This guide can help:

Step 1: Find the right car seat

• Should you get a rear facing car seat? Forward facing? Booster seat? Click here to learn the kind you need as your child grows. This handy visual guide is also helpful; just click on each box for details.
• Next, find a car seat based on your child’s height and weight.
• Car seats are also rated on ease of use. This info may be helpful to narrow down the kind of seat to buy.

Step 2: Correctly install your car seat

A car seat that is not installed correctly can be hazardous to your child.

• Learn proper car seat installation based on the kind of seat you have.
• Click here to learn about the inch test and pinch test – two simple ways to see if the seat is installed properly.
• And, did you know child seat safety inspectors can check your child’s car seat to make sure it is safely installed? (I didn’t!) Check it out.

Step 3: Register your car seat

• You can receive updates and notices about possible recalls by registering your car seat. Here’s how.

Preemies and tiny babies

If you have a premature or low birth weight baby, take time to read these special recommendations and our blog post on tips for tiny babies.

The right car seat, installed and used correctly is a MUST to keep your child safe.

Measles outbreak continues

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Measles picture from the Public Health Image LibraryAre you and your family immunized against measles?

On my way to work today, I heard that the number of measles cases in the United States has continued to rise. At last count, there were 78 cases in 11 states. Most of those cases originated at Disneyland or Disney’s California Adventure theme park. Visitors who went to the parks in December 2014 who were infected with measles spread it to people who were unvaccinated.

What should you do?

If you or your child have not been vaccinated against measles, or if your child is under 12 months old, you need to take precautions. According to the California Department of Public Health: “Any place where large numbers of people congregate and there are a number of international visitors, like airports, shopping malls and tourist attractions, you may be more likely to find measles, which should be considered if you are not vaccinated. It is absolutely safe to visit these places, including the Disneyland Resort, if you are vaccinated.”

The only way to protect against measles is through immunization. The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine protects against the measles disease, as well as the mumps and rubella diseases. Your baby gets the MMR vaccine in two doses: the first between 12 and 15 months, and the second between 4 and 6 years. Adolescents and adults should be up to date on vaccinations. If you are not sure if you have had the vaccine, talk with your health care provider.

Measles and pregnancy

If you are thinking of having a baby, and are not sure if you have been vaccinated, speak with your health care provider. A simple blood test can tell you what vaccines you may need. If you need to get the MMR vaccine, make sure you do so before becoming pregnant. Wait at least 1 month before trying to get pregnant after the shot. If you are already pregnant, get the MMR vaccine after you give birth.

Measles on the rise

Last year, the U.S. had a record number of measles cases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states there have been 644 confirmed measles cases reported for 2014 in the United States. This is the highest number of cases since the U.S. declared that measles was eliminated in 2000. Measles is still common in other parts of the world. International travelers may carry it to the U.S. where they can spread the disease to other people who have not been vaccinated.

As many as one in 20 children with measles develop pneumonia. This is the most common cause of death from measles in young children, according to the CDC. For every 1,000 children with measles, one or two will die.  Children under 5 and adults over 20 are at higher risk for getting complications from the measles virus, including hospitalization and death.

Symptoms of measles typically start to appear one to two weeks after exposure to the virus. Symptoms include a runny nose, watery eyes, cough, a high fever and finally a rash. Measles is so contagious that any child who is exposed to it and is not immune will most likely get the disease.

Special thanks to the CDC and the Public Health Image Library for permission to use the above photo of a boy’s face after three days with measles rash.