Archive for the ‘Baby’ Category

What causes gas in breastfed babies?

Friday, March 17th, 2017

Dad calming babyEveryone has gas, adults and babies alike. Gas is a result of both swallowing air and the digestion process. If your baby has a lot of gas though, you probably have concerns about the cause and more importantly, how to fix the problem.

So what can cause gas in your baby?

  • Anything that could cause your baby to swallow air: This includes crying, sucking a pacifier and eating from either the breast or a bottle.
  • A forceful letdown: If you’re nursing and have an oversupply of milk, your baby may take in too much milk at one time and swallow air. Changing positions, nursing frequently or expressing some of your milk before latching can help.  Reach out to a Lactation Consultant for assistance.
  • An intolerance to proteins in your diet: Most breastfed babies do not have allergic reactions to their mom’s milk. However, if food allergies run in your family, you should discuss this with your lactation consultant. The proteins from foods such as cow’s milk and peanuts pass through breast milk.  Also, be sure to watch your baby for any allergic reactions such as green, mucus-like stools with signs of blood.

What can help your baby’s gas?

  • Change your position while feeding: Tilt your baby up so her head is higher than her stomach. This will allow air to come up and out and milk to go down more smoothly.
  • Burping more often: Try burping during as well as after a feeding. If you are switching breasts, try burping before moving your baby over to your other side.
  • The bicycle: Lay your baby on her back and move her legs in a bicycle motion. Tummy time can also help put pressure on your baby’s stomach to relieve gas.
  • There are over-the-counter medications that may help relieve your baby’s gas. Ask your baby’s provider for a recommendation.

If your baby has excessive gas, there may be other reasons why it is happening. Reach out to your baby’s provider or your Lactation Consultant for an evaluation.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Zika and sperm – a new concern

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

spermThe latest news about the Zika virus is that there is a potential risk that some semen donated to sperm banks in South Florida might be contaminated with Zika.

Here’s why:

  • Zika can remain in semen for several months;
  • men who donated semen may not have shown signs or symptoms of Zika yet they could have been infected with the virus;
  • semen is not tested for Zika, unlike blood and tissue donations.

Therefore, it is possible that an infected man may have unknowingly donated semen contaminated with the Zika virus.

Where is the risk?

Although the Zika virus has been identified in Miami-Dade County, the risk of it spreading to other neighboring areas is possible, since individuals in this part of the state often travel to and from Broward and Palm Beach counties.

CDC says “This analysis has led to CDC identifying that since June 15, 2016, there has been a potential increased Zika risk for residents in Broward and Palm Beach counties because of local travel to areas of active transmission in Florida and challenges associated with defining sources of exposure.” The increased risk in the overall numbers of people exposed to the virus means that donor sperm may be at risk, too.

What does this mean to women trying to become pregnant by donor sperm?

Semen contains sperm, which is necessary for a woman to become pregnant. Although the risk of Zika transmission is small, if a woman wishes to become pregnant or currently is pregnant by donor sperm from these areas in Florida, she should speak with her healthcare provider. There have not been any confirmed cases of the Zika virus infecting a pregnant woman from donor sperm, but the possibility exists that it could occur.

The CDC emphasizes that Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause brain problems, microcephaly, and congenital Zika syndrome, a pattern of conditions in the baby that includes brain abnormalities, eye defects, hearing loss, and limb defects.

See our website for more information on Zika during pregnancy, microcephaly, and congenital Zika syndrome.

The CDC website offers detailed guidance for people living or traveling to South Florida.

Have questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

March is Trisomy Awareness Month

Monday, March 13th, 2017

chromosomesWhat is trisomy?

Babies with trisomy are born with an extra copy of a specific chromosome in most or all of their cells. This means that they have three copies of this chromosome in each cell rather than the typical number, which is two. Health conditions that may be associated with trisomy include heart defects, vision or hearing problems, and intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Chromosomes are the structures in cells that contain genes. Each person normally has 23 pairs of chromosomes, or 46 in all. An individual inherits one chromosome from the mother’s egg and one from the father’s sperm. When an egg and sperm join together, they normally form a fertilized egg with 46 chromosomes.

Sometimes a mistake in cell division occurs before a woman gets pregnant. A developing egg or sperm ends up with an extra chromosome. When this cell joins with a normal egg or sperm cell, the resulting embryo has 47 chromosomes instead of 46.

Common trisomy conditions

Although trisomy can occur with any chromosome, here are the conditions that are most often associated with an extra chromosome:

  • Trisomy 21 or Down syndrome: Down syndrome is one of the most common birth defects. In the US, about 6,000 babies (or 1 in 700) are born with Down syndrome each year. Most affected individuals have intellectual disabilities within the mild to moderate range. Although health conditions such as heart defects and vision and hearing problems are associated, most of these can be treated, and life expectancy is now about 60 years.
  • Trisomy 18 is also called Edward syndrome: Trisomy 18 occurs in about 1 in 5,000 live births each year. Affected individuals may have heart defects, significant intellectual and developmental delays, and other life-threatening medical problems.
  • Trisomy 13, also known as Patau syndrome: Trisomy 13 occurs in about 1 in 10,000 to 16,000 live births each year worldwide. Individuals with trisomy 13 often have heart defects, brain or spinal cord abnormalities, severe intellectual and developmental disabilities, and multiple physical problems in many parts of the body.

It is important to understand that every individual with a trisomy is unique and not all of them will have the same symptoms. The severity of the condition and the associated problems depend on:

  • Which chromosome is duplicated: An extra copy of certain chromosomes, like chromosome 1, is not compatible with life and the embryo will not develop.
  • How much of the extra chromosome is present: If only part of the chromosome is present, symptoms may be milder. If the complete chromosome is present, the symptoms may be more severe.
  • How many cells have the extra chromosome: If the copy of the extra chromosome is in only a few cells (mosaicism), the symptoms are usually less severe than if all of the cells in the body are affected.

In the past 10 years, the March of Dimes has invested over 15  million dollars into research for chromosomal conditions, including trisomy. And many March of Dimes grantees are studying basic biological processes of development. This important research should improve our understanding of how genes and other factors affect the development of a baby.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Is the Zika virus affecting babies in the U.S.?

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

microcephalyShort answer…Yes.

The CDC just released a report that measured the number of brain related birth defects in the U.S. before and after the arrival of Zika. The study focused on data from three areas of the U.S. that track brain related birth defects – Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Atlanta, Georgia – in the year 2013-2014, before Zika arrived in the U.S.

It found that during that time, brain related birth defects occurred in 3 out of 1,000 births (.3%).

A study done looking at 2016 data shows that among women in the US with possible Zika virus infection, similar brain related birth defects were 20 times more common, affecting 60 of 1,000 pregnancies (6%).

This is a huge increase.

Here’s what we know

If a pregnant woman is infected with Zika, the virus can pass to her baby. Zika has been shown to cause a range of birth defects including brain problems, microcephaly, neural tube defects, eye defects and central nervous system problems. Although none of these birth defects are new to the medical field and they can occur for other reasons, it has been clearly established that the Zika virus can cause these serious problems, too.

Babies will require coordinated, long-term care

Babies born with Zika related birth defects will require access to coordinated medical care among a team of specialists. Such care may seem daunting to the parents and even to the medical community as they gather new information about the effects of the virus on a daily basis.

Enter the Zika Care Connect Network (ZCC)

This new website will launch in April 2017 to help parents and providers coordinate care for babies with complex medical needs due to Zika infection. The ZCC aims to improve access to medical care, which will jump-start early identification and intervention. The goal is to reduce the long-term effects of Zika on children and families by making it easier to locate a network of specialists knowledgeable about services for patients with Zika. The searchable database will feature a Provider Referral Network, patient resource tools, and a HelpLine.

Bottom line

Zika is still here, and it is seriously affecting babies and families. The best line of defense is to protect yourself from infection. Our website has detailed information on how to stay safe.

If you have questions, text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Why do we have World Birth Defects Day?

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

wbddlogoIn a day and age when many cures exist for diseases and conditions, it may seem hard to believe that birth defects still occur. Yet, unfortunately they do.

Every year, millions of babies around the world are born with a serious birth defect. In many countries, birth defects are one of the leading causes of death in babies and young children. Babies who survive and live with these conditions are at an increased risk for long-term disabilities and other health problems.

What are birth defects?

Birth defects are health conditions that are present at birth. They may change the shape or function of one or more parts of the body. Birth defects can cause problems in overall health, how the body develops, or how the body works.

There are thousands of different birth defects. The most common are heart defects, cleft lip and palate, Down syndrome and spina bifida. Our website has a list of common birth defects as well as examples of rare birth defects.

We don’t know all the reasons why birth defects occur. Some may be caused by the genes you inherit from your parents. Others may be caused by environmental factors, such as exposure to harmful chemicals. Some may be due to a combination of genes and environment. In most cases, the causes are unknown.

Why #WorldBDDay?

The goal of World Birth Defects Day is to expand birth defects surveillance, prevention, care, and research worldwide. Naturally, the goal is to raise awareness, too.

You can help.

  • Lend your voice! Register with your social media account and Thunderclap will post a one-time message on March 3rd. The message will say “Birth defects affect 3-6% of infants worldwide. It’s a major cause of death/disability. Lend your voice!”
  • Join the Buzzday on Twitter, March 3, 2017 by using the hashtag #WorldBDDay.

With your help, we’ll raise awareness, which is the first step in improving the health of all babies.

What we’re doing

The mission of the March of Dimes is to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. Our research grantees have discovered genes that cause or contribute to a number of common birth defects, including fragile X syndrome, cleft lip and palate, and heart defects. These discoveries may one day lead to interventions so that some birth defects can be prevented.

The March of Dimes offers information about how to have a healthy pregnancy on our website and this blog.

We answer health questions from the public through AskUs@marchofdimes.org, and promote messaging on our Twitter handles, @modhealthtalk, @nacersano (in Spanish) and @marchofdimes.

We welcome your comments and questions.

Rare Disease Day is February 28th. What makes a disorder rare?

Monday, February 27th, 2017

rare-disease-dayAny disease, disorder, illness or condition affecting fewer than 200,000 people in the U.S. is considered rare. The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) says there are about 7,000 rare diseases and disorders which affect roughly 30 million Americans. That’s 1 in 10 people, and more than half of them are children.

Why is rare disease awareness so important?

It is often very hard to diagnose a rare disease and it can take a long time for a correct diagnosis to be made.

Then, even if someone receives a diagnosis, 95% of the conditions have no treatment or cure (which means that only 5% of affected people have a treatment option). As a result, many infants or children die from rare disorders.

Individuals living with a rare disease move through life without getting answers to their most basic questions.

Here are a few examples of rare diseases:

Agenesis of Corpus Callosum (ACC)

This rare disorder is present at birth. The corpus callosum, which connects the left and right sides of the brain, is partially or completely absent. The cause of this condition is usually not known but it can be inherited. Symptoms include delays in reaching developmental milestones, seizures, feeding problems and impairment of mental and social development. Treatment is based on supporting an individual’s symptoms, such as therapies that focus on left/right coordination. Early diagnosis and interventions offer the best chances of improvement.

Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS)

KFS is a skeletal disorder with an abnormal union of two or more bones in the spinal column within the neck. This can cause some affected individuals to have an abnormally short neck with restricted movement. KFS seems to occur randomly for unknown reasons, although in some cases it may be inherited. Treatment is based on an individual’s specific symptoms, and may include surgery and physical therapy.

Progeria, or Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS)

According to NORD, progeria is a fatal, genetic condition of childhood that resembles premature aging. In most cases, it is not passed down in families. The gene change that causes the condition is almost always a chance occurrence that is extremely rare. “In 2012, the results of the first-ever clinical drug trial for children with progeria revealed that Lonafarnib, a type of farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI) originally developed to treat cancer, was shown to be effective for progeria. Other than Lonafarnib, which is not FDA-approved and thus only available through clinical drug trials, the treatment of HGPS is directed toward the specific symptoms that are apparent in each individual.”

Tay-Sachs

This condition is an inherited disease that affects a baby’s central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord). The central nervous system controls how the body works. There is no cure for Tay-Sachs, and a baby with Tay-Sachs usually dies by the time he is 4 years old. We have information about this disease on our website.

NORD provides information on many rare diseases.

#RareDiseaseDay

Rare Disease Day is always on the last day of February each year. This year it’s on February 28th and the focus is on research. The slogan is “With research, possibilities are limitless.” And it’s true, research can help discover treatments and in some cases cures. Research can give hope to people living their day-to-day lives in search of answers.

See rarediseaseday.us or NORD for more info.

Why reading aloud to your baby is so important

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

AA baby mom dad brother in NICU.jpg.resizedDid you know that reading to your baby helps promote language skills? Science has shown that reading to your baby helps build vocabulary, speech, and later reading comprehension, literacy and overall intelligence. Yet, less than half of children under the age of 5 are read to every day.

Reading aloud to your child is such an important aspect of language development that the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers guidance on how to read to your child, including book suggestions for every age.

But what if your baby is in the NICU?

Even if your baby is in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU), it is still incredibly valuable to read to him. The March of Dimes is partnering with Jack and Jill of America, Inc. to provide books to families who have a baby in a NICU. Parents are encouraged to choose books and read to their babies as often as they can.

In this resource, the AAP explains “Why it is never too early to read with your baby.” They say: “When parents talk, read, and sing with their babies and toddlers, connections are formed in their young brains. These connections build language, literacy, and social–emotional skills at an important time in a young child’s development. These activities strengthen the bond between parent and child.”

Why start reading today?

Today is World Read Aloud Day, a perfect time to start a new routine of reading to your child.

If you’re not sure what to read, you can ask your local librarian in the children’s room. You can also acquire books for a home library at second hand stores or even recycling stations. The “dump” in the town where I raised my kids has a book shed where you can drop off or pick up used books for free. And don’t forget, garage or yard sales are great places to get books for nickels. Having a mini-library at home has been shown to help children get off on the right academic foot.

But perhaps the best reason to read to your child is because it brings you together. The snuggles and cuddles, laughter and silliness that may result from reading a wonderful book, brings happiness to both parent and child.

Whether it is in the NICU or at home, reading aloud to your child is one of the most powerful things you will ever do. So grab a book, snuggle up, and enjoy!

 

Is breastfeeding a preemie different than a full term baby?

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

preemieThe answer is yes.

You’ve probably spent the last few months anxiously getting ready for your baby’s arrival. You’ve probably also thought about and decided how you are going to feed your baby after birth. Unfortunately, your breastfeeding plans may need to change in order to accommodate your baby, if you gave birth prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy).

Breastfeeding in the NICU

If your baby is in the NICU, you may need to start pumping to establish your milk supply. Although you won’t have your warm baby at your breast, give your baby any expressed colostrum or milk you produce. Breast milk provides many health benefits for all newborns, but especially for premature or sick babies in the NICU.

Read our tips and tricks to breastfeeding your baby in the NICU.

Late preterm babies

If your baby was born late preterm, between 34 weeks and 0 days and 36 weeks and 6 days of pregnancy,  the good news is that she may not need to spend any time in the NICU. The bad news is that breastfeeding a near-term baby can be very difficult. Late preemies are often very sleepy and lack the energy they need to latch, suck and swallow. Also, late preterm babies are vulnerable to hypothermia (low body temperature), hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), weight loss, slow weight gain and jaundice among other conditions, which may interrupt your breastfeeding progress.

Full term babies

Breastfeeding a full term baby has its challenges, too. But, compared to a preterm or late preterm baby, there are more opportunities to be successful with breastfeeding from the start, due to fewer health obstacles.

Stay positive

If your baby is spending time in the NICU or having trouble breastfeeding, the breast milk you provide your baby through expression or pumping is very beneficial to his growth and protection from illness and infection. Seek help when you need it through a Lactation Consultant, a nurse or your health care provider. If you are in the hospital, ask your nurse if they have a support group where you can connect and share with other moms going through the same situation.

Learn more in Breastfeeding 101.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Key messages from Birth Defects Prevention Month

Monday, January 30th, 2017

MOD dad and babyWe’ve had a busy month spreading the word about birth defects and what you can do to have a healthy pregnancy. If you’ve missed some posts, here’s a one page cheat sheet of key messages.

Birth defects are more common than you’d think.

  • Did you know that every 4.5 minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect in the U.S.? That’s 1 in 33 babies or more than 120,000 babies each year.
  • Birth defects are health conditions that are present at birth. They may affect how the body looks, works, or both.
  • Common birth defects include heart defects, cleft lip and cleft palate, Down syndrome and spina bifida. Some birth defects are on the rise for unknown reasons – like gastroschisis.
  • Birth defects are the leading cause of infant deaths in the first year of life in the U.S.
  • Birth defects are the leading cause of death and disability in children across the world.

There are thousands of different birth defects, and about 70 % of the causes are unknown.

  • Birth defects are thought to be caused by a complex mix of factors including our genes, behaviors and environment.
  • Many birth defects are discovered after the baby leaves the hospital or within the first year of life.
  • Babies who survive and live with birth defects are at an increased risk for long-term disabilities and lifelong challenges.

Not all birth defects can be prevented, but SOME CAN. Here’s how:multivitamin

Share and connect

Birth defects can happen to any family. Share and connect with others on our online community Share Your Story.

Have questions? Email our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Parent navigators – a lifeline for NICU moms and dads

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

Preemie on oxygen.jpg resizedIf you’re the parent of a baby born prematurely, you know the stress and anxiety that is a part of having your baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care unit (NICU).  Even if the entire NICU staff is super supportive and answers your every question, you may still feel like you’re on an ocean in a life raft without oars or directions. The feeling can be overwhelmingly scary.

Then, once your baby is discharged from the NICU, you may begin a whole new journey of medical visits, specialists, therapies, and figuring out the complex world of health insurance. If your baby has special healthcare needs, these next steps may be confusing at best.

Enter Parent Navigation Programs. These are programs designed to assist parents of children with special healthcare needs. The hook is that parents are assisting parents. The parent navigators have been in their shoes, as they have children with special healthcare needs.

One of our NICU Family Support Partner hospitals, Children’s National Health System in Washington D.C., employs parent navigators to provide support to parents of children with complex medical conditions. They help the parents of newly diagnosed babies or young children navigate the complicated healthcare system to get the care their child needs and to access vital community resources. And, perhaps the best part is that these parent navigators provide the emotional support that only another parent of a special needs child can fully understand.

Children’s National started their Parent Navigator Program in 2008, and is now launching a new program aimed specifically towards parents of newborns in the NICU. These babies may be born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), with complex medical conditions and/or with birth defects.

“This short-term, peer-to-peer “buddy” program looks to decrease stress, anxiety and depression in mothers of NICU babies during hospitalization” says Michelle Jiggetts, MD, MS, MBA, Program Administrator of the Complex Care Program and the Parent Navigator Program at Children’s National.

The success of this new program will be measured scientifically, by looking at the differences between parents who leave the NICU with a parent navigator, and those who do not. They will measure caregiver stress, anxiety and depression, as well as the amount of healthcare services a baby uses after leaving the NICU. The hope is that the group that had the benefit of a parent navigator for a year following their baby’s hospital discharge, will fare better overall – both parents and baby. You can learn more about this unique program, here.

According to Dr. Jiggetts, the parent navigator’s role is to:

  1. Provide peer-to-peer mentoring and support
  2. Link families to community resources and support groups
  3. Coach parents to be active partners and communicate effectively with health care providers
  4. Suggest useful tools (e.g. care notebooks) to help organize medical information
  5. Help families navigate the healthcare system and insurance issues
  6. Encourage families to focus on self-care

It seems like a no-brainer that a program like this will be incredibly helpful. As we all know, babies don’t come with instruction manuals, and infants with special healthcare needs have their own intense challenges. Having a peer “buddy” available to provide the low-down each step of the way must be a life-line that any parent would appreciate, but especially a parent of a preemie or baby with a health condition.

Even though you’re in a life raft on that ocean, you’ve now been given oars and a compass, and land is in sight.