Posts Tagged ‘breastfeeding’

Is donor milk right for your preemie?

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

feeding in the NICUFor premature babies, breast milk can be lifesaving. It is more easily digested and provides protection against many diseases. Providing breast milk, however, can be a challenge for some moms. Many moms are not able to provide their baby with their own breast milk for various reasons, they:

  • are recovering from surgery or have certain medical conditions that make it difficult to initiate and maintain a milk supply;
  • find it difficult to pump enough milk to meet their baby’s needs;
  • have chronic conditions and need to take medications that may make their breast milk unsafe.

In these cases, donor milk may be the best option for your preemie, and a better alternative to formula.

What is donor milk and where does it come from?

A milk bank is a service that collects, screens, processes and distributes safe human milk to babies in need. All donated milk goes through a pasteurization process to eliminate bacteria while keeping the milk’s essential nutrients. The milk is then packaged, stored and ready to ship to hospitals or individual recipients at home. Lactating women who wish to donate their breast milk may do so through a milk bank.

Does your preemie need donor milk?

The nutritional needs of each baby depends on many different factors. It’s important to talk to your baby’s doctor to see if donor milk is right for your baby. Some hospitals have their own donor milk bank or have a partnership with a milk bank near them. If your baby’s doctor indicates that your baby will benefit from donor milk, he can write a prescription. For more information about the milk bank closest to you, visit the Human Milk Banking Association of North America.

Can you buy breast milk from another mom who has milk to spare?

There are risks with getting breast milk from a stranger or a friend; this milk is not tested or screened for infectious diseases or contamination. A study published in the American Academy of Pediatrics showed that out of 101 samples of milk purchased online from different mothers, 74% of samples were contaminated with bacteria and 21% of samples contained cytomegalovirus (CMV) bacteria.

It’s important to be informed when making feeding decisions for your preemie. If you have any questions about donor milk or your baby’s nutritional needs, speak with your baby’s healthcare provider.

Benefits of breastfeeding

Monday, August 31st, 2015

sg_breastfeeding1Breast milk is the best food for your baby during the first year of life and we recommend exclusively breastfeeding for about the first six months. Your milk helps your baby grow healthy and strong and can protect him from many illnesses. How does your breast milk do this?

Breast milk…

• has hormones and the right amount of protein, sugar, fat and most vitamins to help your baby grow and develop.
• has antibodies that help protect your baby from many illnesses. Antibodies are cells in the body that fight off infection.
• has fatty acids, like DHA (docosahexanoic acid), which help support your baby’s brain and eye development. It may lower the chances of sudden infant death syndrome, also known as SIDS, too (SIDS is the unexplained death of a baby younger than 1 year old).
• is easy to digest. A breastfed baby may have less gas and belly pain than a baby who is fed formula.
• changes as your baby grows so he gets exactly what he needs at the right time. For example, for the first few days after giving birth, your breasts make a thick, yellowish form of breast milk called colostrum. Colostrum has nutrients and antibodies that your baby needs in the first few days of life. It changes to breast milk in 3 to 4 days.
• is always ready when your baby wants to eat. Your body makes as much breast milk as your baby needs. The more your baby breastfeeds, the more milk your body makes.

What if you are sick? Should you still breastfeed?

In most cases, yes, you should continue to breastfeed. The antibodies your body produces to fight off an illness will be passed to your baby through your milk and protect him. If you stop breastfeeding when you are sick, you will reduce your baby’s protection and even increase his chance of getting sick. If you feel a cold coming on, rest, drink plenty of fluids and keep on breastfeeding. If you are uncertain about whether to breastfeed while sick, ask your Lactation Consultant or baby’s pediatrician.

Read our blog to learn how to keep your breast milk safe and other helpful posts in Breastfeeding 101.

Have questions? Text or email us at We are here for you.

Keeping track of feedings and diapers

Monday, August 24th, 2015

Mom breastfeeding (2)Did you know the March of Dimes developed a breastfeeding log just for busy moms? We hope it will make it just a little easier to see if your baby is getting what he needs to grow and thrive.

Being a new mom can be tough. You have so many things to think about and remember while caring for your little one, such as which breast your baby last ate from or how many wet or soiled diapers he had today. But it is important to keep track of this information to make sure your baby is eating well and gaining enough weight.

The breastfeeding log can be used to track:

• Day and times of your baby’s feedings
• How long your baby feeds from each breast
• Which breast you started nursing from at each feeding (so you can begin the next feeding from the other breast).
• How much breast milk you pump
• Number of wet diapers or bowel movements per day
• Breastfeeding problems or concerns

Our breastfeeding log is especially helpful if your baby is in the NICU. You can track how often and how much milk you express. Many moms struggle to make breast milk when their babies are sick and it may take a few days of pumping before you produce enough milk. If you have trouble making enough breast milk, ask for help and support. A lactation consultant can use the information in your log to make sure you’re on the right track.

To ensure your baby is gaining enough weight, bring your log to each of your baby’s visits with his health care provider. If your baby is slow to gain weight, the breastfeeding log can help you and your baby’s provider spot and take care of feeding issues before they become a problem.

See other breastfeeding posts here.

Have questions? Text or email us at We are here to help.

Breastfeeding and hair treatments

Monday, August 17th, 2015

breastfeeding and hair treatmentsYou’ve given birth to your little peanut, congrats! You may be thinking that now you can finally return to some of the activities you enjoyed before becoming pregnant. For example, you may have stopped dying your hair during pregnancy. The fall season is around the corner and a new cut and color may be in order, but if you’re breastfeeding now, is it safe to head to the salon?

Hair treatments include hair coloring, curling (permanents), bleaching and straightening agents. Low levels of hair dye can be absorbed through the skin after application, and the dye is excreted into the urine.

But, according to the experts at Mother to Baby, “There is no information on having hair treatments during breastfeeding. It is highly unlikely that a significant amount would enter the breast milk because so little enters the mom’s bloodstream. Many women receive hair treatments while breastfeeding, and there are no known reports of negative outcomes.”

Despite this good news, if you are still hesitant, you might consider highlights or streaks, as the dye is not placed directly on the scalp.

If you have any questions about breastfeeding, speak with a lactation consultant or email us at We are happy to help!

Breastfeeding 101

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

If you’re breastfeeding or thinking about breastfeeding, you’ve come to the right place. This post is your one-stop-shop for all things breastfeeding. Stop in for a quick glance or stay for a while and browse the different blog posts below. We’ll keep adding new ones as they are published. If you have questions, email us at We are here to help.

• Breastfeeding myths debunked

Breastfeeding myths debunked part 2 

The do’s and don’ts of bottle-feeding 

• Breastfeeding your baby in the NICU can be challenging 

• Breastfeeding a baby with a cleft lip/palate  

• Breastfeeding and returning to work 

• Formula switching, what you need to know 

• Alcohol and breastfeeding 

• Breastfeeding on demand vs. on a schedule 

• Keeping breast milk safe

 “Can I continue breastfeeding now that I am pregnant again?”

• Breastfeeding and hair treatments

Keeping track of feedings and diapers

Benefits of breastfeeding


“Can I continue breastfeeding now that I am pregnant again?”

Friday, August 7th, 2015

pregnant woman and toddlerThis is a question we often receive from moms who are breastfeeding their child when they find out they are pregnant again. And the answer is yes, you can still breastfeed throughout your pregnancy depending on your medical history, your older baby’s responses, your milk supply and your own feelings. There is no documented danger to mother or fetus when a mother breastfeeds through a healthy pregnancy. There are some things however to keep in mind and consider as your pregnancy progresses.

Talk to your health care provider

There are a few medical reasons why a pregnant woman should consider weaning during pregnancy. Speak to your provider about continuing breastfeeding if you have:

• Uterine pain or bleeding
• Miscarried in the past
• A history of premature delivery
• lost weight during your pregnancy

Changes to your breast milk

After the first few months of pregnancy, your milk supply may decrease. As your milk changes to colostrum in preparation for birth the taste will change. These two things may lead your child to wean on his own. If your child continues to breastfeed though, make sure he goes to all his well-baby visits with his health care provider to ensure he is gaining enough weight throughout your pregnancy.

Make adjustments

As your body continues to change, you may experience emotional ups and downs with breastfeeding. Nipple tenderness, caused by hormonal changes, is one of the first symptoms of pregnancy and may make breastfeeding uncomfortable. As pregnancy continues, and your belly grows, it may also become difficult for your child to reach the nipple. It may help to experiment with different nursing positions, such as lying on your side while nursing.

Take care of yourself

Pregnancy and breastfeeding both require extra energy. Make sure you get plenty of rest. Putting your feet up while breastfeeding your child may also allow you to get some much needed relaxation. It is important that you gain the appropriate amount of weight during your pregnancy, eat nutritious foods and drink plenty of water. It may be necessary to consume extra calories while breastfeeding during pregnancy. Speak with your provider about what is right for you.

Stay positive

Take your pregnancy and breastfeeding day by day. As emotions and your comfort level continue to change, try to avoid expectations about how breastfeeding will go. Being flexible is the key to making breastfeeding during pregnancy a positive experience. If you need extra assistance and support, don’t hesitate to ask for help. Speak with your provider, a lactation consultant or a peer counselor to help you through your pregnancy. You can also look for a breastfeeding support group in your area. Read our web article for more information.

Thinking about maternity leave

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

pregnant woman with ipadHave you heard that Netflix is offering unlimited paid parental leave to their employees? During their first year as new parents, Netflix employees can take as much time off as they choose while still earning their normal salary. This is really an amazing policy. If you’re working and pregnant, you probably have thought a lot about maternity leave. Over the past 30 years, the participation rate in the labor force of women with children under age 3 has risen from 34.3% in 1975 to 60.9% in 2011. Half of all mothers work during pregnancy and return to work after their baby is born. And among women who worked during their pregnancy between 2005 and 2007, 58.6% returned to work 3 months after giving birth and 72.9% returned to work 6 months after giving birth. It is important to know what options are available to you so that you can plan ahead.

Under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) employees can take time off from work without pay for pregnancy- and family-related health issues. The act provides up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave per year. It also requires that you can keep your health insurance benefits during the leave. To qualify, you must have worked for your employer for at least 12 months, worked at least 1,250 hours during the last 12 months, and worked at a location where the company has 50 or more employees within 75 miles.

In addition to the FMLA leave, your employer may have its own maternity leave policies. Talk to your boss or someone from human resources (also called HR). Here are some questions you may want to ask:

  • Does your employer offer paid maternity leave? Some employers offer paid time off for the birth of your baby. Talk with someone from HR to find out if you have paid maternity leave.
  • Does your health insurance continue while you’re on maternity leave? If you get your health insurance through your employer, your HR person can tell you about what your insurance plan covers. You may need to change your health plan after your baby’s born to make sure he’s covered, too.
  • Does your employer offer flex time or telecommuting for when you’re ready to go back to work? For example, can you work fewer hours each week or work from home at the beginning? And then increase your hours or your time in the office little by little over a few weeks?
  • Are there other programs or services that your employer offers to new moms? If you’re breastfeeding, find out if your employer has a lactation room. This is a private space (not a bathroom) that you can use to pump breast milk. Employers with more than 50 employees must provide this space for breastfeeding moms.

Finally, choosing a child care provider that works best for you can be tough. Try to explore your options and finalize your plans before your baby arrives.  If you can organize childcare before you deliver, it will make your time at home with your baby more relaxing and enjoyable.

Breastfeeding in public is getting easier

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

Alcohol and BreastfeedingIf you are a mom who is breastfeeding your baby, you may feel that your social life is sometimes curtailed. Breastfeeding every two to three hours, can make it very difficult to go out to public places if you can’t find a clean, safe place to feed your baby when she is hungry.

Now, take me out to the ballgame just got a little bit easier.

Thanks to lactation rooms and breastfeeding pods which are popping up in all sorts of places, nursing moms can escape to a quiet, private place to breastfeed and not miss any of the fun.

Breastfeeding pods (portable enclosed spaces designed specifically for breastfeeding or expressing milk) are already at somebreastfeeding pod airports, making travel much easier for a mom on the go. They are also popping up at ball parks. Recently, Fenway Park in Boston, MA, added a breastfeeding pod, so baseball enthusiasts need never miss a game.

Before you head out of the house to a public place, call ahead and ask if they have accommodations for breastfeeding moms. You may not have ever noticed or seen a lactation room or pod at the venue. But if you know it is there, you may feel more comfortable bringing your baby along. You will enjoy yourself without missing a feeding. You can also go to the Mamava pod website or use their app to locate a pod.

Another option is to use the Moms Pump Here lactation room locator. It tells you where you can find quiet, clean, safe places to breastfeed or pump. Use their website or download their app for info on the go.

So much has changed from the days when women would breastfeed their babies in a ladies room (ugh) or worse yet – stay home and miss special events. With the known benefits of breastmilk, it is logical that more accommodations are being made for lactating moms, so that they can feed their babies when they are away from home.

Keeping breast milk safe

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

mom breastfeedingThere are a few things you need to take into consideration if you are breastfeeding or pumping your breast milk, in addition to
avoiding alcohol while breastfeeding.


Consuming coffee, tea and caffeinated sodas in moderation is fine if you are breastfeeding or pumping. If you find that your baby is fussy or irritable when you consume a lot of caffeine (usually more than 5 caffeinates beverages per day) you should consider decreasing your consumption. Keep in mind that caffeine can be found in:

• Coffee and coffee-flavored products, like yogurt and ice cream
• Tea
• Soft drinks
• Chocolate and chocolate products, such as syrup and hot cocoa
• Medications used for pain relief, migraines and colds

The amount of caffeine in different products varies as well, depending on how it was prepared and served (such as an espresso or latte beverage.) Make sure you check packaging for the number of milligrams of caffeine in one serving.


You probably knew during your pregnancy to avoid eating fish that contains high amounts of mercury such as shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish. The same is true while you are breastfeeding. Including fish in your diet is a good way to get protein and healthy omega-3 fatty acids, so eat fish that contain less mercury, like canned light tuna, shrimp, salmon, Pollock and catfish.


Some prescription medicines, such as those to help you sleep, painkillers and drugs used to treat cancer or migraine headaches, aren’t safe to take while breastfeeding. Others, like certain kinds of birth control, may affect the amount of breast milk you make. Read our post on medications and breastfeeding and speak with your provider about any over-the-counter and prescriptions medications you are taking.

Medical conditions

Certain medical conditions can make breastfeeding unsafe for your baby. These include:

• If your baby has galactosemia, a genetic condition where your baby can’t digest the sugar in breast milk.
• If you have HIV.
• If you have cancer and are getting treated with medicine or radiation.
• If you have human T-cell lymphotropic virus. This is a virus that can cause blood cancer and nerve problems.
• If you have untreated, active tuberculosis. This is an infection that mainly affects the lungs.
• If you have Ebola, a rare but very serious disease that can cause heavy bleeding, organ failure and death.

Smoking and street drugs

Don’t smoke. Nicotine, a drug found in cigarettes can pass to your baby through breast milk and make him fussy and have a hard time sleeping. It can also reduce your milk supply so your baby may not get the milk he needs.

Don’t take street drugs, like heroin and cocaine. You can pass these substances to your baby through breast milk.

Tell your provider if you need help to quit smoking or using street drugs.

Bottom Line

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. If you need support, read our article on how to receive help with breastfeeding.



Breastfeeding on demand vs. on a schedule

Monday, June 29th, 2015

breastfeedingWe often receive questions from new moms asking when they should start their newborn’s next feeding. If they breastfed their baby at 2pm, they wonder if they should wait to feed their baby until 5pm. The golden rule is to feed your baby when she’s hungry, called “on-demand” feeding. It is more important to watch your baby for cues that she’s hungry rather than worry about the timing of her feeding.

If you have ever gone to a party, the hostess usually will offer you food or a drink without first asking “are you hungry?” She offers you the food and then you can decide if you want to eat. The same should go for your baby. If she seems unsettled, try breastfeeding. If she is hungry and feeds, you made a good guess; but if not, then you know you can try to settle her in another way (rocking, walking, etc.)

Newborns may eat between 8 and 12 times over 24 hours, which is about once every 2 to 3 hours. If that seems like a lot, it is! Feedings may last about 15-30 minutes. But each baby is different and your baby may need to feed more often or for longer amounts of time.

Will you have enough milk for all these feedings?

The amount of milk a woman can produce and store varies greatly and is not determined by the size of her breasts. As your baby sucks on your nipple, she stimulates your hormones to send a message to your brain telling your body to produce milk. Your hormones, along with your baby’s suckling causes your breasts to “letdown” and provides the milk to your baby’s mouth. Letdown may also occur when you think about your baby, or hear her or even another baby cry.

The more often you nurse, the more milk your body will produce. Your milk production will slow between feedings when milk accumulates in your breast and will speed up when the breast is emptier. Your body is producing milk all the time, the only thing that changes is the speed of production. Your breasts do not need to feel “full” in order to produce enough milk for your baby. The key to breastfeeding on demand is to feed your baby when she wants for as long as she wants. Ignore the clock!

Still not convinced? Here’s the science behind milk production

Your body produces two hormones, prolactin and oxytocin. The hormone prolactin tells your body to use its proteins, sugars and fat from your blood supply to make breast milk. The oxytocin tells your body’s muscles to contract and push the milk into your ductal system and into your nipple as your baby sucks. As your baby continues to suck, your body releases more prolactin which triggers your body to make more breast milk. Between feedings your body’s prolactin levels off, but once you start feeding again, your milk production restarts. So, if you want to produce more milk, you will need to breastfeed or pump more often.

Tips to keep in mind

• If your baby feeds more often than every two hours, it does not mean there is a supply problem.
• For most babies, breast milk is easier to digest than formula. This is why a breastfed baby may feed more often than a formula fed baby.
• You do not need to wait for your breast to ‘refill’ before your baby’s next feeding.
• Certain factors can affect your letdown reflex such as being tired, being stressed or having pain in your breast. Seek support when you need it. 
• Read about common breastfeeding myths in Breastfeeding myths debunked -part 1 and part 2.
• Remember, any breast milk you provide your baby is beneficial. It’s important to find the methods and solutions that work best for you and your baby.

Worried if your baby is getting enough to eat? Visit our page.

Have questions? Email us at