Posts Tagged ‘early intervention’

Developmental screenings are helpful for early diagnoses

Monday, April 10th, 2017

doctor-and-babyBefore your baby leaves the hospital, he receives a series of tests called newborn screening. These tests look for serious but rare conditions, including blood, hearing and heart disorders. If a problem is discovered through newborn screening, your baby may receive treatment and often avoid a more serious health problem. Early diagnosis is critical in detecting certain medical conditions.

Other screenings occur after your baby is home from the hospital

Between birth and age 3, your baby goes through incredible changes. He is growing and developing every day. To be sure that your baby is “on track,” your baby’s healthcare provider will check his developmental milestones at each well-baby visit.

These milestones are the major achievements in your child’s life. They include smiling, babbling, rolling over, sitting up, crawling, reaching grabbing, talking, walking and other accomplishments. Parents can check milestones, too. Here is a list of behaviors to look for at specific ages.

If either you or your baby’s provider are concerned that your baby is not progressing well, you can request a developmental screening. It is free as part of the federally funded early intervention program. Similar to newborn screening, this screening helps to identify potential health or developmental problems early.

If your child qualifies, the early intervention program may include services such as speech therapy, physical or occupational therapy, or even a special preschool setting. Early intervention can be enormously helpful in helping your child improve. And, the sooner you begin intervention, the sooner your baby can reach his full potential.

One example of a diagnosis where early intervention is particularly important is Autism. April is autism awareness month, a time to remember that this developmental disorder affects 1 in 68 children in the U.S. Officially called autism spectrum disorder or ASD, it is a developmental disability that can cause social, communication and behavior challenges – from mild to severe. This is why it is referred to as a “spectrum” disorder.

ASD can be difficult to diagnose because there is no medical test, like a blood test, to give a definite answer as to whether your child has it or not. Usually, children with ASD start showing signs or symptoms of the disorder in their toddler or preschool years, and some babies show signs in their first year of life. For this reason, taking your child for regular visits with his healthcare provider is particularly important so that his development can be monitored. If your child needs early intervention services, getting it early is key in helping him progress.

Bottom line

There is a wide range of “typical development” for children. But, if you are concerned about your child’s progress or feel he is delayed in reaching his milestones, talk to his healthcare provider sooner rather than later.

You can find more information in our series on Delays and Disabilities: How to get help for your child.

Remember – don’t delay with delays.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org

Physical therapy – can it help your preemie?

Wednesday, October 14th, 2015

Preemie walkingMany children born prematurely may need help catching up with developmental milestones such as sitting, crawling or walking. They may need assistance learning everyday activities such as dressing, too. Physical therapy – one type of habilitative service – may help. Habilitative services are those therapies that help a child develop new skills needed for everyday life.

October is National Physical Therapy Month. This is a great time to become aware of the benefits that physical therapy (PT) can offer your child, whether he was born prematurely or full term.

What does PT do?

Physical therapy can help your child increase strength and flexibility. It can also improve posture, balance, coordination and movement. PT usually focuses on large muscle groups, such as the legs, but it can also involve the entire body.

A physical therapist is a professional who has specific training in understanding the way a body works – especially muscle groups. She can assess your child and provide individualized therapy which will help him improve in the areas where he is weak. PTs are very creative in their approach to working with children. In fact, the therapy can be lots of fun, and most children look forward to their PT sessions.

Does insurance cover PT?

Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), habilitative services must be covered by insurance. They are included in the ACA as Essential Health Benefits, which means they need to be covered under individual and small group health insurance plans. Check your state for specific details. For information on enrolling in your state’s marketplace for health insurance, go to HealthCare.gov or call 1-800-318-2596.

Early intervention may include PT at no cost to parents

If your child is under the age of three, he may be eligible for Early Intervention services, which is a federal program provided in every state. Physical therapy is one of many services available for eligible infants and toddlers if they qualify. Therapy is usually provided at no cost to parents.

If your child is age three or older, he may qualify for PT through your local school district as a Related Service. This post will tell you how to access it.

Bottom line

As with all delays or disabilities, it is important to seek help as early as possible. The sooner your child gets the help he needs, the sooner he can begin improving.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

See other posts on Delays and Disabilities: how to help your child.

 

Vocabulary at age 2 may predict kindergarten success

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

parents reading to toddlerThe size of a child’s vocabulary at age two may predict how well he will do in kindergarten, according to a new study. The larger the oral vocabulary, the better prepared he will be for school.

The study looked at 8,500 children in the United States. The researchers found that:

  • preemies or babies with a very low birth weight, and babies whose mothers had health issues had smaller vocabularies.
  • children with parents who frequently interacted with their children and read to them on a regular basis had larger vocabularies.
  • girls tended to have a larger vocabulary than boys.
  • children from higher socioeconomic homes had larger vocabularies.
  • children with larger vocabularies at 24 months of age did better in reading and math and had fewer behavioral problems.

The researchers believe that interventions should be started early enough so that children who are at risk due to medical/health problems or socioeconomic disadvantages, have the time to develop and catch up. Interventions need to be targeted especially to toddlers who are living in disadvantaged homes.

Keep in mind that no two children develop exactly alike. Some are early bloomers while others are later bloomers. And one study cannot predict an individual child’s development.

What can you do?

The single most effective way to help your baby expand his vocabulary is to read to him. Start when your baby is born, and read every day. Reading aloud helps promote language skills – vocabulary, speech and later on, reading comprehension. See this post to learn just how important reading is for your baby and to learn where to get books. See the AAP’s article for tips on how to make it fun. And remember, the best parts about reading to your little one are the snuggles and cuddles that go along with it.

If your baby is showing signs of a developmental delay, speak with his health care provider, or contact your Early Intervention Program and ask for a free screening. If your child qualifies, he may receive personal, targeted intervention (such as speech therapy) to help him catch up.

Don’t delay with delays!

Have questions? Text or email them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

The study appeared in the journal Child Development.

Learn how to help your child in our Delays and Disabilities series.

Helping babies with FASD

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

baby in distress

Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause your baby to have serious health conditions, called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Alcohol can also cause your baby to:

• Be born too soon (prematurely)
• Have birth defects (heart, brain and other organs)
• Have vision or hearing problems
• Be born at low birthweight
• Have intellectual disabilities
• Have learning disabilities
• Have sleeping and sucking problems
• Have speech and language delays
• Have behavioral problems

What can you do?

The earlier a child is diagnosed with FASD, the sooner interventions can begin, and the child can start making progress. Special services that can help a child with FASD include early intervention, special education, speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy and other services. This blog series can help you learn how to access services for babies and toddlers or children ages 3 and older.

Not all babies born with FASD will experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms. According to Mother-to-Baby, “There are reports of withdrawal symptoms in infants whose mothers consumed alcohol near delivery. Symptoms included tremors, increased muscle tone, restlessness and excessive crying…Once your baby is born, it is also recommended you tell your pediatrician about your alcohol use during pregnancy. Your baby can be evaluated for effects of alcohol exposure. Services and support are available for children with alcohol related problems.”

Additional resources

The FASD Center for Excellence has information, including screening, diagnosing, intervention programs and resources.

The National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) has a resource list and several fact sheets that may be very helpful to parents of children with FASD, such as FASD Identification.

March of Dimes’ role

In 1973, March of Dimes grantees were the first to link drinking alcohol in pregnancy with a specific pattern of birth defects and intellectual disabilities they called Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Since then grantees have continued to study how alcohol harms the developing brain, and to discover better ways to prevent and treat FASDs in alcohol-exposed babies.

Here is more information, including resources on how to quit drinking alcohol. The good news is that FASD is entirely preventable by avoiding alcohol during pregnancy.

If you have questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. View other posts in the Delays and Disabilities: How to get help for your child series, here.

 

World BD day gets word out globally

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

Sick babyThe twitter-sphere was all aglow yesterday for the first-ever World Birth Defects Day. In fact, 6,154,146 people were reached worldwide! Yup. It’s not a typo.

Twelve leading global organizations including the March of Dimes, along with scores of other foundations, hospitals, health care providers, government agencies, parents and individuals with birth defects took to Twitter to raise awareness. People in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, England, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Mexico, Mongolia, Netherlands, Panama, Philippines, Rwanda, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, Tanzania, Turkey, and individuals from all over the United States participated. As the day progressed, #worldbdday tweets continually popped up on my computer screen. In case you missed it, here is a snapshot of important messages.

Birth defects are surprisingly common

Did you know that every 4 ½ minutes a baby is born with a birth defect in the US?

In the US, about 1 in 5 babies die before their 1st birthday due to birth defects.

Birth defects affect 1 in 33 infants worldwide.

More than 8 million babies worldwide are born each year with a serious birth defect.

There are thousands of different birth defects, and about 70% of the causes are unknown.

The most common birth defects are heart defects, neural tube defects and Down syndrome.

In the US, a baby is born with a congenital heart defect every 15 minutes.

More than 300,000 major birth defects of the brain and spine occur worldwide each year.

Many birth defects are discovered after the baby leaves the hospital or within the 1st year of life.

More than 3.3 million children under 5 years of age die from birth defects each year.

Babies who survive & live with birth defects are at an increased risk for long-term disabilities & lifelong challenges.

Early intervention services may help babies w/ BDs; get your child help by starting early.

Birth defects are costly. Financial and emotional costs of birth defects take a toll on families and communities worldwide.

Learn how to decrease your risk of having a baby with birth defects

Taking folic acid before & early in pregnancy can help to reduce the risk for BDs of the brain & spine.

Smoking during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of certain BDs. It’s never too late to quit.

We can’t prevent all birth defects. We CAN prevent FASD! (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders)

FASDs are 100% preventable.

Alcohol can cause your baby to have BDs (heart, brain & other organs). Don’t drink if you are pregnant or trying to conceive.

Being overweight before pregnancy can increase the risk for some birth defects.

Not all BDs are preventable, but women can take steps toward a healthy pregnancy.

Make a PACT: plan ahead, avoid harmful substances, choose a healthy lifestyle, and talk to your doctor.

Raise awareness

Awareness of birth defects & the importance of care for children with these lifelong conditions is key.

The mission of the March of Dimes is to prevent birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.

March of Dimes has invested more than $50 million in birth defects research in the last 5 years.

Genetics has long been a main theme of March of Dimes research.

MOD grantees have discovered genes that cause or contribute to a number of common birth defects, including fragile X syndrome, cleft lip and palate, and heart defects.

These discoveries pave the way for treatments and preventions for these birth defects.

 

For more information, email AskUs@marchofdimes.org. See other topics in the series on Delays and Disabilities- How to get help for your child, here.

From NICU to EI services

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

preemie hand in adult handIf your baby was born prematurely or at a low birth weight, chances are he or she may benefit from Early Intervention (EI) services. EI services are designed to help your baby catch up developmentally. They can include speech, physical or occupational therapy, as well as other kinds of treatment.

Usually, the hospital NICU staff will give you the information to have your baby screened or evaluated so that services may begin soon after your baby gets home (if they are needed). But, parents – you should know that a doctor or hospital referral is not needed to start the process of requesting early intervention services. You can contact your state’s agency yourself. Although it is very helpful for hospitals to give parents all of the information they need to get services started early, a hospital referral is not a requirement for a screening.

Read this post on Early intervention for babies and toddlers to learn how to request a screening. In many cases, a phone call to your state’s early intervention program is all you need to initiate an evaluation (which is free of charge to you). EI services are available in every state and territory of the United States.

Don’t delay with delays. The sooner your baby gets help, the sooner he can start catching up. If you are concerned about your baby’s development, make the call, get the free screening, and put your mind at rest.

See other topics in the Delays and Disabilities series here.

Parenting your child with a heart defect

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

in the NICUWhen your baby has a heart defect, it is overwhelming, exhausting, emotionally draining, and beyond scary. Have I left any adjectives out?

Congenital (present at birth) heart defects (CHDs) affect 1 in 100 babies every year. These heart defects can affect the heart’s structure, how it works, or both. Did you know that congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects? Each year, about 40,000 babies are born with a heart defect in the U.S. The good news is that more and more children born with CHDs are living longer, healthier lives, due to medical advances.

Heart defects develop in the early weeks of pregnancy when the heart is forming. Severe congenital heart defects are usually diagnosed during pregnancy or soon after birth. Less severe heart defects often aren’t diagnosed until children are older. Depending on the heart defect, your child may or may not need active treatment. For example, some defects resolve on their own. However, there are heart defects that require more intensive treatment and care.

What is CCHD?

Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a group of the seven most severe congenital heart defects:  Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS); Pulmonary atresia (PA); Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF); Total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPV, or TAPVR); Transposition of the great arteries (TGA); Tricuspid atresia (TA); Truncus arteriosus.

About 1 in 4 babies born with a heart defect has CCHD, or about 4,800 babies in the U.S. every year. Babies with CCHD need treatment soon after birth – often within hours, days or months, depending on the severity of the condition. A baby with CCHD will need ongoing treatment from a pediatric cardiologist, a medical doctor with advanced training.

Your child with CCHD

Some babies with CCHD will receive surgery soon after birth, and others require subsequent surgeries as they get older. The treatment your child receives will depend on the type and severity of the defect. If your child has been diagnosed with CCHD, it is important to understand his disease and the treatment that is required. Ask your child’s pediatric cardiologist and pediatrician all of your questions. The doctor can tell you if your child’s activity should be encouraged or restricted, if your child needs antibiotic treatment before certain procedures, if your child requires extra calories (from food) to help maintain his health, if he needs physical therapy or other kinds of therapies.

Children with heart defects may be delayed in reaching their developmental milestones. Early intervention may help enable your child to make strides and catch up. Other children may develop a disability over time. The early intervention program is designed to be family centered – moms and dads receive help in parenting their child, and the child receives therapy to keep progressing. Early intervention, together with medical advances, are helping children with CCHD live richer, fuller lives.

You may need support

Parenting a child with a congenital heart defect involves a blend of vigilance, medical interventions, health advocacy and lots of love and patience. The March of Dimes’ online community, Share Your Story, is a place where parents of babies with heart defects as well as other birth defects or disabilities, can go to find support, comfort and information. There is nothing like the camaraderie of another parent who has walked in your shoes to help you through your journey.  Just log on and post a comment and you will be welcomed and supported.

Where can you learn more?

Visit our website to learn more about CCHD. We discuss the most common heart defects, how they are diagnosed and treated, as well as possible causes. You will also learn about screening tests your baby can have to determine if he has CCHD. Additional guidance on parenting a child with a heart defect is available on the CDC website.

For more information about any of the heart defects listed above, contact us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org and we will be happy to help. To see similar posts in the Delays and Disabilities series, click here.

 

 

 

 

The special language of special needs

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

kayak without a paddleIf you have a child with special needs, you have no doubt heard tons of words, initials or acronyms that you did not understand. You may have had to stop and ask for clarification or a definition. Or, even worse, you did not ask and were lost as the conversation zoomed on and you kept trying to make sense of it all.

The world of special needs, including delays, disabilities, early intervention and special education, has its own language. The sooner you familiarize yourself with the many acronyms, the easier it will be to navigate your child’s world and be an effective advocate. Without this info, it is like being in a boat (or a kayak) without a paddle.

Just to drive my point home, here is an analogy. Would you ever take an upper level language class without first taking the introductory course? Would you take Algebra II without first taking basic math? Would you take your driver’s test without looking at the manual first? You’d be lost (or at least I would be), and nothing would make sense to you. This is why you need to get the basics down, especially before you go into meetings that pertain to your baby or child’s intervention services.

Help is here

Here is my blog post with tons of acronyms to use as a cheat sheet. It is appropriately called Learning the Lingo.

Next, you can find many more on the CPIR website, where the NICHCY materials have migrated. Their Alphabet Soup has an exhaustive list of words with their meanings.

Lastly, Words and terms – a whole new world breaks out the terms pertaining to early intervention and then for special education.

So check them out, click on the highlighted terms to learn more, and print out the acronym sheet for your reference. You’ll be glad to have this info in one tidy place. Then, when the conversations turn to IFSPs or LREs, you will know exactly what everyone is talking about. Soon, you’ll be paddling upstream with confidence!

 

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need, select “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date. You can also see a Table of Contents of prior posts, here.

Feel free to ask questions. Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Good-bye NICHCY. Hello CPIR.

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

waving goodbye or helloLike most people, I am resistant to change. Once I get used to something, I am irked when it is re-arranged or changed, or worse, eliminated. But, today I am writing about a change that made me unhappy at first, but in the end, I feel good about.

In many of my blog posts, I have directed parents to NICHCY (the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities), where hundreds of helpful articles on early intervention, special education, disabilities and the law can be found in an easy to read format. The bad news is that in less than one week, NICHCY’s website will be closed. The good news is that most of the information has been moved to CPIR – the Center for Parent Information and Resources. Thankfully, the valuable information that NICHCY has created over the years will still be accessible on the CPIR site.

I recommend that you go directly to the CPIR page, Quick Find/NICHCY Resources, which links you directly to a roadmap of NICHCY’s topics. You can also access information through their alphabetical listing.

NICHCY’s specialty was helping parents access and navigate the early intervention and special education systems. They have important information on creating an IFSP and IEP. They also offer information on the IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) which is the law ensuring that children with delays or disabilities receive a free, appropriate education. You will also find fact sheets on specific disabilities as well as materials in Spanish.

So, as sad as I am to see NICHCY go, I am thrilled that this information is not lost, and it will continue to be kept current by the good folks at CPIR. This is the kind of change that I can bear quite easily.

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need,  select “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date.

If you have comments or questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We welcome your input!

Table of Contents for the Delays and Disabilities series

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

If you are new to this series, or if you want to catch up on posts you may have missed, this is a good way to see all the posts. They are grouped by topic to help you navigate your way.

Table of Contents

Why this blog series?
A new blog series is here

How to get early intervention and special education services
Babies and toddlers:

Understanding Preemie cues

Understanding developmental milestones and delays

Vocabulary at age 2 may predict kindergarten success

Preemies- adjusted age and delays

Here’s a tool to monitor your child’s physical development

Early intervention for babies and toddlers

From NICU to EI services

What is an IFSP?

Guest post from the CDC on early intervention

Don’t delay with delays

How does your state define developmental delay?

Kids ages 3 and older:

Prematurity, disabilities and special education

Turning 3 – the leap from early intervention to special ed

Early intervention and special ed for children ages 3 and older

What is an IEP?

What are related services?

IEP or 504 – that is the question!

IEP reviews in April

IEPs on TV

April is IEP month

IEP season is here

What is Prior Written Notice or “PWN?”

IEPs and LREs – the nitty gritty

An easy way to find resources for kids with special needs

Summer programs for kids with special needs

Delays, disabilities and the law

Learning the lingo

Words and terms – a whole new world

Changing a program for a child with special needs

What is peer-reviewed research?

Keeping track of your child’s records

How to get your child’s records organized

The special language of special needs

Happy 25th Anniversary ADA

Good-bye NICHCY. Hello CPIR.

Pediatric medical specialties

Getting to know your NICU healthcare team

What are pediatric specialties?

Finding pediatric specialists

What is a developmental behavioral pediatrician?

What is a child psychologist?

How to find a specialist for a birth defect or rare disease

Therapies and Treatments

What is physical therapy or “PT”?

Physical therapy – can it help your preemie?

What is occupational therapy, or “OT”?

What is speech therapy?

Respiratory therapists help babies and families breathe easier

Pragmatics – helping your child learn the rules of social language

What are hippotherapy and therapeutic riding (THR)?

What are recreation services?

Kids with challenges zoom on souped up kiddie cars

Sensory issues

Light and sound in the NICU

Sensory difficulties in children

Everyday tips for dealing with sensory special kids

Help for sensory issues

Changing seasons can be tough for a child with sensory issues

Fireworks are not fun for kids with sensitive hearing

Fourth of July – fabulous or frightful for kids with special needs?

Sensory friendly malls

Halloween ideas for kids with food allergies or sensory challenges

Heavy backpacks hurt- Here’s how to lighten the load

Understanding the diagnosis – in preemies and babies with special needs

Preemies and asthma – how to help your child

RDS and BPD – breathing problems in preemies

Pneumonia and preemies

Brain bleeds in premature babies

An allergy or a cold – learn how to tell the difference

Preemies and hearing loss

Hearing loss in babies

Did you hear me? What is Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)?

Learning differences, disabilities and disorders – are they all the same?

What are learning disabilities (LDs)?

LDs – What they ARE and are NOT

What is dyslexia?

What is dyscalculia?

What is dysgraphia?

What is dyspraxia?

Prematurity, learning disabilities and ADHD

Understanding intellectual and developmental disabilities

Oh to be understood! Learn what your child with LD experiences

Parenting your child with a heart defect

Preemies as adults – are their health problems due to prematurity?

Helping babies with FASD

Talking to your child about his medical condition

How knowing your family health history may help your baby

Tracking birth defects helps states help you

Thalidomide and Dr. Frances Kelsey

Coping – day in and day out

Staying positive in the NICU

How to cope when your baby is in the NICU

Skin to skin contact helps your baby AND you

When can your baby go home from the hospital?

NICU parents can develop PTSD due to stress and trauma

Caring for yourself as you care for your preemie

Recognizing families who care for preemies 

The NICU dad – Superman has nothing on him!

Do you know your baby’s different cries?

Breastfeeding a baby with a cleft lip or palate

Parenting your child with a heart defect

Medication mistakes are common

It’s good – no, great – to read to your baby

Avoiding and handling tantrums

More resources for handling meltdowns

Positive reinforcement – the power of one M&M’s® candy

Positive reinforcement – fortune cookie advice

Caring for your sick baby (understanding signs of illness and learning when to call the doctor)

Flu can be serious for kids with special needs

Flu is dangerous for certain people

Shingles, kids and pregnant women – know the facts

Can sleep affect your child with special needs? Or you?

Research shows a consistent bedtime routine can help your child sleep

A social skills tip for kids with special needs

Apps for math LD and other disabilities

There’s an app for that (for kids with learning challenges)

Knowing your family health history  may help your baby

Getting through transitions, holidays, vacations and disasters

A transition tip

Bracing for the holidays

Spending holidays in the NICU

Holidays and your child with special needs – tips for the NICU, visiting Santa, dinners and traveling

Taking Thanksgiving in stride

Holidays 🙂 or 🙁

Visiting Santa is do-able for kids with special needs

Toys glorious toys! (for kids with special needs)

New Year’s Resolutions – good or bad for kids with special needs?

Let it go! Let it go! Let it go! (an inspirational holiday poem)

Adjusting to life after the holidays

Getting back in the swing (after a holiday)

Camps and vacations

How to find camps for children with special needs

Tips for family travel when your child has special needs

Vacationing with your child with special needs

Accommodations help vacationers with special needs

Re-entry: life after vacation

Back to school

Kids with special needs head back to school

Summer to September

From summer to school – the big transition

Back to school is hard on kids and PARENTS!

Shopping for toys for kids with special needs

Preparing for disasters when you have a child with special needs

Surviving and thriving – Your child with special needs, your other children, and YOU

Stop. Rest. Relax…Repeat.

Getting guilt-free time off – what worked for one mom

Special moms need special care

Caring for the caretaker – put on your oxygen mask

Caring for yourself as you care for your preemie

Caring for the siblings of a child with special needs

Having a baby in the NICU can be stressful for siblings

Sibling visits to the NICU can be helpful

Do siblings of children with disabilities need help?

Fathers help mold their children’s future

Avoid a tragedy – learn safe sleep strategies

Laughter helps your body, mind and mood

It’s a marathon, not a sprint

Resilience. When struggles can be a good thing.

Have you found your child’s passion?

Brace yourself: the ShareUnion message

Living with loss

What’s Happening

World Birth Defects Day gets the word out

First ever World Birth Defects Day

You can also see all of the blog posts by clicking on Help for Your Child under “Categories” on the menu. Scroll down to read the blog posts in reverse chronological order. If you have comments or questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We welcome your input!