Posts Tagged ‘ice’

Snowy days and pregnancy – what you need to know

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

shovel in snow If you’re pregnant, you need to be extra careful about walking on the snow and ice. Here’s why:

During pregnancy, your ligaments become looser to allow your body to accommodate your growing baby. The hormone relaxin helps to prepare your body for labor and delivery, but it can also affect your joints making you feel unsteady. This change can put you at risk for injury, especially on slippery pavements.

If you are in your third trimester of pregnancy, your center of gravity may be off balance, which could make you prone to slips and falls. Your center of gravity refers to the place in your body that helps anchor you to the earth, so that you don’t tip over. A natural point of balance is below the navel and halfway between the abdomen and lower back. Having a strong center of gravity helps you have good balance.

During pregnancy, as your baby grows, your center of gravity moves forward and upward. Therefore, feeling off-balance is likely to worsen later on in your pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. Slipping and falling is much easier when your center of gravity has shifted.

Be prepared

Try to get help from family or friends with shoveling snow. Keep a bag of calcium chloride handy and sprinkle it on slippery walks to melt the snow and ice.

With a little thought and planning, you can remain safe during the cold, winter months. Then, when your baby is born, your center of gravity and ligaments will slowly return to normal again, and you can resume your usual activities.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

de Quervain’s tenosynovitis

Monday, September 21st, 2009

36237998_thbIn de Quervain’s tenosynovitis, the sheath of the tendons on the thumb side of your wrist becomes swollen. This restricts the tendons’ movement. The result with de Quervain’s tenosynovitis is discomfort and pain EVERY time you turn your wrist, grasp anything or make a fist.

This condition can occur in postpartum women due to the position of the thumb in abduction for extended periods of time while holding a baby. Additionally, prolactin levels in new mothers who are breastfeeding may have something to do with it.  Often, if a woman stops breastfeeding, de Quervain’s will disappear.

Your doctor may confirm a diagnosis of de Quervain’s tenosynovitis by doing a Finkelstein test. In this simple test, you bend your thumb across the palm of your hand and bend your fingers down over your thumb. Then you bend your wrist toward your little finger. If this causes pain on the thumb side of your wrist, the test is considered positive.

I was diagnosed with de Quervain’s tenosynovitis in BOTH hands several months ago. It’s a real pain (no pun intended). Movements like lifting the baby up from her crib, brushing my hair and picking up a pot off the stove are all very painful and aggravate the swelling. My doctor told me to immobilize my wrists and thumbs with braces (yeah, right – try doing that while taking care of a baby), ice it and take ibuprofen. Hopefully, once I stop nursing it will go away. I have no idea when that will be though, so for now I just have to grin and bare it.

Happy Monday!

I’m in labor and I’m thirsty!!

Thursday, August 27th, 2009

glass-of-water-2For years, health care providers have told thirsty women in labor, “Sorry. All you can have is ice chips.” But good news, change is on the way!

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recently announced that it is changing its guidelines. Women can now have small amounts of clear liquids during labor, if they wish. Examples of these liquids are water, fruit juice without pulp, sodas, clear tea, black coffee and sports drinks.

Women are still not allowed to have solid food. Why? If a woman needs a c-section and has anesthesia, the food could accidentally get into her lungs and cause a serious medical problem.