Posts Tagged ‘ligaments’

Snowy days and pregnancy – what you need to know

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

shovel in snow If you’re pregnant, you need to be extra careful about walking on the snow and ice. Here’s why:

During pregnancy, your ligaments become looser to allow your body to accommodate your growing baby. The hormone relaxin helps to prepare your body for labor and delivery, but it can also affect your joints making you feel unsteady. This change can put you at risk for injury, especially on slippery pavements.

If you are in your third trimester of pregnancy, your center of gravity may be off balance, which could make you prone to slips and falls. Your center of gravity refers to the place in your body that helps anchor you to the earth, so that you don’t tip over. A natural point of balance is below the navel and halfway between the abdomen and lower back. Having a strong center of gravity helps you have good balance.

During pregnancy, as your baby grows, your center of gravity moves forward and upward. Therefore, feeling off-balance is likely to worsen later on in your pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. Slipping and falling is much easier when your center of gravity has shifted.

Be prepared

Try to get help from family or friends with shoveling snow. Keep a bag of calcium chloride handy and sprinkle it on slippery walks to melt the snow and ice.

With a little thought and planning, you can remain safe during the cold, winter months. Then, when your baby is born, your center of gravity and ligaments will slowly return to normal again, and you can resume your usual activities.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Baby feet

Friday, October 23rd, 2009

19393021_thbBelieve it or not, the human foot is one of the most complicated parts of the body. It has 26 bones, including a complex system of ligaments, muscles, blood vessels and nerves. The feet of young children are soft, pliable and grow quite rapidly during the first year. For these reasons, podiatrists consider this period to be the most critical stage of the foot’s development.

Here are some suggestions from the American Podiatric Medical Association to help promote normal development:

Look carefully at your baby’s feet. If you notice something that does not look normal to you, contact the baby’s pediatrician or a podiatrist. Many deformities will not correct themselves if left untreated.

Keep your baby’s feet unrestricted. No shoes or booties are necessary for infants. These can restrict movement and can inhibit toes and feet from normal development.

Provide an opportunity for exercising the feet. Lying uncovered enables the baby to kick and perform other related motions which prepare the feet for weight bearing.

Change the baby’s position several times a day. Lying too long in one spot can put excessive strain on the feet and legs. Be sure to limit how much time your baby spends standing in an activity center to no more than 15 minutes at a time.

It is not recommended to force a child to walk. A child will walk when physically and mentally ready. When a baby first begins to walk, shoes are not necessary indoors. As a toddler, walking barefoot allows the youngster’s foot to grow normally and to develop its musculature and strength, as well as the grasping action of toes. When walking outside or on rough surfaces, babies’ feet should be protected in lightweight, flexible footwear made of natural materials.