Posts Tagged ‘pain’

Understanding preemie cues

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

preemie handFor parents, seeing your little one in the hospital, hooked up to tubes and machines can be scary and overwhelming. We want the best for our children, and it can be unbearable to wonder if your baby is in pain or uncomfortable. Worrying comes naturally, especially when your baby can’t talk and tell you how she is doing. But did you know that babies have certain expressions and behaviors or “cues” that can tell you a lot about how she is feeling? By observing your preemie, she will give you signals that tell you if she is happy, sleepy, in pain, or ready to interact with you.

Learn your baby’s behaviors

Here are a few cues that may help you understand your baby better:

• Happy and content – A calm baby will have relaxed arms, legs and face, stable breathing, an even skin color, and may look around.

• Stressed – Her fingers may splay out wide, she will frown or grimace. Her breathing may increase and her skin become blotchy or pale. She may arch her back or neck, cry and even suddenly become limp or fall asleep.

• Self-soothing – Your baby will try to soothe herself by sucking on her fingers, grasping something (like your finger or a blanket), put her hands on her face or clasp her hands together.

Your preemie’s cues will tell you what she needs. For example, if your baby is stressed, she may be getting too much stimulation. The stimulation can come from too much sound, light or even the combination of being touched AND spoken to at the same time. According to authors Linden, Paroli and Doron in Preemies – the Essential Guide for Parents of Premature Babies, 2nd Edition, “a premature baby is less able to shut out stimuli and to calm herself down after being disturbed.”

What can you do?

Ask the NICU nurse how to comfort your baby. For example, if your baby arches her back, hold back or change your touch. See whether she calms when you cup her head and feet with your hands.

If your baby turns toward you, offer her eye contact or a gentle voice — or both. If she turns away when you talk but toward you when you sing, she’s showing a preference for that kind of voice. Keep in mind that some preemies can only process one stimulus at a time. She may like and respond to touch but not touch in combination with your voice.

Your premature baby’s cues will change as she gets older. As you get to know your baby, you will be amazed at how well you interpret her movements and expressions, and understand how she is feeling or what she wants.

By knowing infant cues, you can learn how to connect with your baby, and respond to her needs. Hopefully, knowing how your baby is feeling will help you to relax and not worry so much.

Source: Preemies- The Essential Guide for Parents of Premature Babies, 2nd Edition, by Linden, Paroli and Doron, 2010.

Note: This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need, select “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date. You can also view the Table of Contents of prior posts.

Heavy backpacks hurt- how to lighten the load

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

backpacks-150x150Pain and strain. Did you know heavy backpacks can be the cause of posture and back problems? Many children with special needs have musculoskeletal issues. A very heavy backpack may add additional challenges to an already sensitive child.

Yesterday, on my way to work, I noticed a group of kids headed for the bus stop. I could not help but observe their gigantic backpacks, full to the brim, and noticeably heavy. One little girl was struggling to stay upright as she shifted the weight of her backpack from left to right, in an effort to hurry along and catch her bus.

The daily carrying of heavy packs can cause muscle strain and pain, and may lead to back, shoulder or neck injuries. The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) has designated today as National School Backpack Awareness Day. They are holding events in different areas of the country. Even if you don’t make it to a backpack event, it is well worth your time to read AOTA’s tip sheet on Backpack Strategies for Parents and Students.

AOTA offers strategies on how to lighten the load, pack the backpack properly and wear it correctly. For instance, did you know that the pack should not weigh more than 10% of your child’s weight? (If your child weighs 80 pounds, the loaded pack should not weigh more than 8 pounds.) Also, you can make hoisting a pack easier by packing the heaviest items close to your child’s back. Using both shoulder straps is also key to minimizing injuries. Learn more helpful tips on their sheet.

So, help your child “pack it light and wear it right.” You could well avoid injuries and pain with a few simple changes.

Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. Go to News Moms Need and click on “Help for your child” on the menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date.

If you have comments or questions, please send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org. We welcome your input!