Posts Tagged ‘PPD’

Postpartum care: What you need to know about the new guidelines

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recently released new guidelines calling for changes to improve the postpartum care women receive after giving birth. Postpartum care is important because new moms are at risk of serious and sometimes life-threatening health complications in the days and weeks after giving birth. Too many new moms suffer or die from causes that could have been prevented.

How have ACOG’s postpartum care guidelines changed?

In the past, ACOG recommended that most women have a postpartum checkup 4 to 6 weeks after giving birth. A postpartum checkup is a medical checkup you get after having a baby to make sure you’re recovering well from labor and birth. ACOG now says that postpartum care should be an ongoing process, rather than a one-time checkup. Your postpartum care should meet your personal needs so that you get the best medical care and support. Seeing your health care provider sooner and more often can help prevent serious health complications.

ACOG recommends that all women should:

  • Have contact with their health care provider within 3 weeks of giving birth
  • Get ongoing medical care during the postpartum period, as needed
  • Have a complete postpartum checkup no later than 12 weeks after giving birth

How can you get ready for postpartum care?

Make a postpartum care plan with your provider. Don’t wait until after you have your baby — make your plan while you’re pregnant at one of your prenatal care checkups. To make your plan, talk to your provider about:

Learn more about postpartum care at marchofdimes.org.

Warning signs to look for after having a baby

Thursday, May 10th, 2018

Your body worked hard during pregnancy, helping to keep your baby healthy and safe. But your body also changes after having a baby. While some changes are normal and help you recover from pregnancy, others may be a sign that something may not be right. Seeking medical care is the best thing you can do if you have any of the following warning signs or symptoms:

  • Heavy bleeding (more than your normal period or gets worse)
  • Discharge, pain or redness that doesn’t go away or gets worse. These could be a sign of infection in your c-section incision or if you had an episiotomy.
  • Intense feelings of sadness and worry that last a long time after birth. These could be a sign of postpartum depression (also called PPD). PPD is a kind of depression that some women get after having a baby.
  • Fever higher than 100.4F
  • Pain or burning when you go the bathroom
  • Pain, swelling and tenderness in your legs, especially around your calves. These could be a sign of deep vein thrombophlebitis (also called DVT), a kind of blood clot.
  • Red streaks on your breasts or painful lumps in your breasts. These could be a sign of mastitis, a breast infection.
  • Severe pain in your lower belly, feeling sick to your stomach or vomiting
  • Vaginal discharge that smells bad
  • Severe headaches that won’t go away
  • Vision changes

Call your health care provider or dial 911 right away if you have any of these signs or symptoms:

  • Bleeding that can’t be controlled
  • Chest pain
  • Trouble breathing
  • Signs of shock, such as chills, clammy skin, dizziness, fainting or a racing heart
  • Seeing spots

If you feel like something is wrong, call your provider. It is important to get help so that you can enjoy being with your new baby.

For more information

Is it postpartum depression?

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018

Welcoming a new baby into your life is an exciting moment. But for some moms, feelings of happiness after giving birth mix with intense feelings of sadness and worry that can last a long time. These feelings can make it difficult for you to take care of yourself and your baby. This is called postpartum depression (also known as PPD).

PPD is a kind of depression that some women get after having a baby. But you’re not alone. In fact, up to 1 out of every 7 women has PPD, making it the most common complication for new moms. Postpartum depression can happen any time after having a baby. Often times, it starts within 1 to 3 weeks of having a baby.

How do you know if it’s PPD?

The exact causes of PPD are not known. We know that it can happen to any woman after giving birth, and that perhaps the changing hormones after pregnancy may lead to PPD. We also know that there are some things that may make you more likely than other women to have PPD, such as having a family health history of depression, and having had a stressful event in your life, like having a baby in the NICU. However, one of the most important things you can do is learn the signs of PPD.

You may have PPD if you have 5 or more of the following signs of PPD that last longer than 2 weeks:

Changes in your feelings:

  • Feeling depressed most of the day every day
  • Feeling shame, guilt or like a failure
  • Feeling panicky or scared a lot of the time
  • Having severe mood swings

Changes in your everyday life:

  • Having little interest in things you normally like to do
  • Feeling tired all the time
  • Eating a lot more or a lot less than is normal for you
  • Gaining or losing weight
  • Having trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
  • Having trouble concentrating or making decisions

Changes in how you think about yourself or your baby:

  • Having trouble bonding with your baby
  • Thinking about hurting yourself or your baby
  • Thinking about killing yourself

If you think you have PPD, call your health care provider right away. If you’re worried about hurting yourself or your baby, call emergency services at 911.

PPD is a medical condition that needs treatment to get better. PPD is not your fault. You didn’t do anything to cause PPD and you can get help to help you feel better and enjoy being a mom.

For more information and support:

Emotional changes after having a baby

Friday, March 30th, 2018

It is common to have emotional changes after your baby is born.

You may feel excited, exhausted, overwhelmed, and even sad at times.

Taking care of a baby is a lot to think about and a lot to do.

On top of all that, after the birth of your baby, your hormones are adjusting again.

As a result, these changes can have an effect on your emotions and how you feel.

Here are few suggestion that may help you:

  • Tell your partner how you feel. Let your partner help take care of the baby.
  • Ask your friends and family for help. Tell them exactly what they can do for you, like go grocery shopping or make meals.
  • Try to get as much rest as you can. We know it’s easier said than done, but try to sleep when your baby is sleeping.
  • Try to make time for yourself. If possible, get out the house every day, even if it’s for a short while.
  • Eat healthy foods and be active when you can (with your health care provider’s ok). Eating healthy and getting fit can help you feel better.
  • Don’t drink alcohol, smoke or use drugs. All these things are bad for you and can make it hard for you to handle stress.

If you experience changes in your feelings, in your everyday life, and in how you think about yourself or your baby that last longer than 2 weeks, call your health care provider right away. These could be signs of postpartum depression.

How do you know if you have postpartum depression?

Postpartum depression (also called PPD) is different from having emotional changes. PPD happens when the feelings of sadness are strong and last for a long time after the baby is born. These feelings can make it hard for you to take care of your baby. You may have PPD if you have five or more signs of PPD that last longer than 2 weeks. These are the signs to look for:

Changes in your feelings:

• Feeling depressed most of the day every day
• Feeling shame, guilt or like a failure
• Feeling panicky or scared a lot of the time
• Having severe mood swings

Changes in your everyday life:

• Having little interest in things you normally like to do
• Feeling tired all the time
• Eating a lot more or a lot less than is normal for you
• Gaining or losing weight
• Having trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
• Having trouble concentrating or making decisions

Changes in how you think about yourself or your baby:

• Having trouble bonding with your baby
• Thinking about hurting yourself or your baby
• Thinking about killing yourself

If you think you may have PPD, call your health care provider right away. There are things you and your provider can do to help you feel better. If you’re worried about hurting yourself or your baby, call emergency services at 911.

Postpartum depression – don’t suffer in silence

Monday, March 27th, 2017

img_postpartum_depIf you keep up with celebrity news, you may have read about model and TV series host Chrissy Teigen’s recent struggle with Postpartum Depression (PPD). Chrissy was feeling all sorts of symptoms without knowing the cause or that there could be an explanation.

Postpartum depression (also called PPD) is a kind of depression that you can get after having a baby. PPD is strong feelings of sadness that last for a long time. It is the most common complication for women who have just had a baby; in fact 1 in 9 women suffer from PPD, which is different from the “baby blues.” Many women don’t know why they are suffering or are hesitant to reach out for help.

One of Chrissy’s greatest attributes is her ability to be truthful and “tell it like it is.” In her essay that was published in Glamour, she writes “I also just didn’t think it could happen to me… But postpartum (depression) does not discriminate. I couldn’t control it. And that’s part of the reason it took me so long to speak up: I felt selfish, icky, and weird saying aloud that I’m struggling.”

Signs of PPD

You may have PPD if you have five or more signs that last longer than two weeks:

Changes in your feelings:

  • Feeling depressed most of the day every day
  • Feeling shame, guilt or like a failure
  • Feeling panicky or scared a lot of the time
  • Having severe mood swings

Changes in your everyday life:

  • Having little interest in things you normally like to do
  • Feeling tired all the time
  • Eating a lot more or a lot less than is normal for you
  • Gaining or losing weight
  • Having trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
  • Having trouble concentrating or making decisions

Changes in how you think about yourself or your baby:

  • Having trouble bonding with your baby
  • Thinking about hurting yourself or your baby
  • Thinking about ending your life

If you have any of the symptoms mentioned above or think you may have PPD, call your health care provider. There are things you and your provider can do to help you feel better. Reach out for help and support today. For more information about PPD, see our article.

 

Help to bring postpartum depression out of the shadows

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Contemplative womanDid you know that 1 in 7 mothers experience postpartum depression but only 15% receive care? The March of Dimes is working to urge Congress to pass a bill that will bring postpartum depression out of the shadows to ensure that mothers get the proper mental health care they need. This very important legislation will make it easier for women to get the screening and treatment they need for postpartum depression.

Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common health problem for new mothers. In fact, between 9-16% of moms experience PPD in the first year after the birth of their baby.

We’re not sure what causes PPD but it can happen to any woman after she’s given birth. It’s possible that PPD may be due to changing hormone levels after pregnancy. Also, PPD can happen any time after childbirth. But it most often starts within 1 to 3 weeks of having a baby.

While we don’t know the exact cause of PPD, we do know that there are some things that may make you more likely than other women to have PPD:

  • You’re younger than 20.
  • You’ve had PPD, major depression or other mood disorders in the past. You may have been treated for these conditions. Or you may have had signs of them, but never saw a health care provider for treatment.
  • You have a family history of depression. This means that one or more people in your family has had depression.
  • You’ve recently had stressful events in your life.

If you think you may have PPD, see a health care provider right away. PPD is a medical condition that needs treatment to get better. The vast majority (90%) of mothers with PPD can be treated successfully. But first, PPD needs to be diagnosed. Getting treatment early can help both you and your baby.

Please contact your members of Congress and ask them to support legislation to increase access to PPD screening and ensure all affected women get the treatment they need. Help us to help moms suffering in silence.

Postpartum depression: more common than you think

Friday, June 20th, 2014

depressionMost of us have heard about postpartum depression (PPD). But you may not know that PPD is the most common health problem for new mothers.

For most women, having a baby brings joy and happiness. However, the sudden change in hormones after childbirth leaves many women feeling sad or moody. This is common and is often referred to as the baby blues. But about 1 in 8 new moms have more than a mild case of baby blues. These women experience strong feelings of sadness that last for a long time and can make it difficult for them to take care of their baby. This is called postpartum depression (PPD).

PPD can happen any time after childbirth, although it usually starts during the first three months. It is a medical condition and it requires medical treatment.
We’re not sure what exactly causes PPD but it can happen to any woman after having a baby. We do know that certain risk factors increase your chances to have PPD:
• You’re younger than 20.
• You’ve had PPD, major depression or other mood disorders in the past.
• You have a family history of depression.
• You’ve recently had stressful events in your life.

You may have PPD if you have five or more of the signs below and they last longer than 2 weeks.

Changes in your feelings:
• Feeling depressed most of the day every day
• Feeling shame, guilt or like a failure
• Feeling panicky or scared a lot of the time
• Having severe mood swings

Changes in your everyday life:
• Having little interest in things you normally like to do
• Feeling tired all the time
• Eating a lot more or a lot less than is normal for you
• Gaining or losing weight
• Having trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
• Having trouble concentrating or making decisions

Changes in how you think about yourself or your baby:
• Having trouble bonding with your baby
• Thinking about hurting yourself or your baby
• Thinking about killing yourself

If you’re worried about hurting yourself or your baby, call emergency services at 911 right away.

If you think you may have PPD, call your health care provider. Your provider may suggest certain treatments such as counseling, support groups, and medicines. Medicines to treat PPD include antidepressants and estrogen. If you’re taking medicine for PPD don’t stop without your provider’s OK. It’s important that you take all your medicine for as long as your provider prescribes it.

PPD is not your fault. It is a medical condition that can get better with treatment so it is very important to tell your doctor or another health care provider if you have any signs. The earlier you get treatment, the sooner you can feel better and start to enjoy being a mom.

 

Updated October 2015.