Posts Tagged ‘premature birth’

Do you know the signs of preterm labor?

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

If you’re pregnant, it’s important to know the signs of preterm labor and what to do if you experience any symptoms. Watch our video with Dr. Siobhan Dolan to learn more:

You can get more information about preterm labor and premature birth on our website.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Health disparities in premature birth

Friday, April 14th, 2017

In the United States, rates of preterm birth, low birthweight, and infant mortality are higher for black, non-Hispanic infants than for white, non-Hispanic infants. These differences, or disparities, Baby w pacifierbetween races and/or ethnicities have a great impact on the health and well-being of families.

What we know

  • Premature birth is when a baby is born too soon, before 37 weeks of pregnancy.
  • While the overall preterm birth rate in 2013 was 11.4%, the rate was higher among non-Hispanic black infants (16.3%) compared to non-Hispanic white infants (10.2%). This means that the preterm birth rate for black infants was 60% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white infants.
  • 11.3% of Hispanic infants were born prematurely. Hispanic women account for about 1 out of every 4 premature births in the US (23.2%). The preterm birth rate among Hispanic women is falling more slowly than the rate in the non-Hispanic white population and the non-Hispanic black population.
  • The number of black infants born at a low birthweight (a baby is born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces) was almost twice that of white infants and Hispanic infants.
  • The death of a baby before his or her first birthday is called infant mortality. The rates of infant mortality are higher for babies born before 37 weeks and at a low birthweight.
  • A recent study published by the CDC, showed that from 2005 to 2014, infant mortality rates declined for all races, except American Indian or Alaska Natives. But babies born to non-Hispanic black women continue to have an infant mortality rate more than double that of non-Hispanic white women.

We don’t know why race plays a role in premature birth.

Even when researchers compare women of different races and ethnicities and remove any known risk factors in their analysis (such as smoking, obesity, and high blood pressure), the disparities in the rate of premature births still exist.

Researchers at the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center Ohio Collaborative are trying to better understand health disparities. Dr. Irina Buhimschi has found that there is a population of Somali women in the US with a low rate of premature birth—as low as or lower than white women. Dr. Buhumschi and her team are trying to determine what makes this population different. “We believe a variety of genetic, environmental and social factors are involved in preterm birth. From stress and resilience, to diet and lifestyle, to vaginal and gut bacteria, we will comprehensively study why Somali-American women have lower rates of preterm birth.” Dr. Buhimschi then hopes to develop a plan that can help all populations reduce their chances of premature birth.

You can read more about Dr. Buhimschi’s research here.

The March of Dimes supports research, community programs, and advocacy policies that try to reduce health disparities and make sure that all babies have a healthy start in life.

Where does all the weight gain go during pregnancy?

Friday, March 24th, 2017

Now that you’re pregnant, your body is changing to get ready for your baby. Gaining weight is an important part of pregnancy.

If you gain too little or too much weight during pregnancy, you’re more likely than other women to have certain complications such as a premature birth (before 37 weeks of pregnancy).

You may be wondering – where does all the weight go? If you’re at a healthy weight before pregnancy and gain 30 pounds during pregnancy, here’s where you carry the weight:

pregnant woman on scale

  • Baby = 7.5 pounds
  • Amniotic fluid = 2 pounds. Amniotic fluid surrounds the baby in the womb.
  • Blood = 4 pounds
  • Body fluids = 4 pounds
  • Breasts = 2 pounds
  • Fat, protein and other nutrients = 7 pounds
  • Placenta = 1.5 pounds. The placenta grows in your uterus (also called womb) and supplies the baby with food and oxygen through the umbilical cord.
  • Uterus = 2 pounds. The uterus is the place inside you where your baby grows

Gaining weight slowly and steadily is best. You may not gain any weight in the first trimester, or you may gain a little more or a little less than you think you should in any week. Try not to worry about it.

Gaining weight is necessary for your pregnancy, but gaining the right amount is also important. Talk to your prenatal care provider about the weight gain that is best for you and your body.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

U.S. study shows fewer babies are dying in their first year of life

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

The death of a baby before his or her first birthday is called infant mortality. A new report released by the CDC shows that the infant mortality rate in the U.S. dropped 15% from 2005 to 2014. In kangaroo-care-242005 the rate was 6.86 infant deaths per 1,000 live births. In 2014, the rate dropped to 5.82 deaths per 1,000 live births.

While the study did not look at the underlying causes of the decline, it did report valuable information:

  • Infant mortality rates declined in 33 states and the District of Columbia. The other 17 states saw no significant changes.
  • Declines were seen in some of the leading causes of infant death including birth defects (11% decline), preterm birth and low birthweight (8% decline), and maternal complications (7% decline).
  • The rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) declined by 29%.
  • Infant mortality rates declined for all races, except American Indian or Alaska Natives.
  • Infants born to non-Hispanic black women continue to have an infant mortality rate more than double that of non-Hispanic white women.

“On the surface, this seems like good news. But it is far from time to celebrate,” said Dr. Paul Jarris, chief medical officer for the March of Dimes. “What is concerning, though, is that the inequities between non-Hispanic blacks and American Indians and the Caucasian population have persisted.” Dr. Jarris adds, “This report highlights the need to strengthen programs that serve low income and at-risk communities, especially those with the highest infant mortality rates.”

The infant mortality rate is one of the indicators that is often used to measure the health and well-being of a nation, because factors affecting the health of entire populations can also impact the mortality rate of infants.

What can you do?

Having a healthy pregnancy may increase the chance of having a healthy baby. Here are some things you can do before and during pregnancy:

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

New research links premature birth to mom’s risk of heart disease later in life

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

preemie and momThis headline has raised concerns among women who have had a premature baby (birth before 37 weeks) – and for good reason.

In a published study, researchers analyzed data from more than 70,000 women to look at the association between premature delivery and future cardiovascular disease (CVD). They found that women who delivered a baby before 37 weeks gestation in their first pregnancy had a 40 percent greater risk of heart disease later in life, compared to women with term deliveries. This finding occurred even after accounting for pre-pregnancy sociodemographic, lifestyle, and CVD risk factors.

And there’s more.

Women who delivered before 32 weeks gestation had double the risk of CVD later in life compared to women with term deliveries.

So what does this mean for moms who gave birth early?

The results from the study are concerning, but researchers have stated that premature delivery may be an early warning sign of future heart problems, but not the cause of them. Factors such as pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes, both of which can cause preterm labor, are already considered risk factors for future CVD. More research is needed to determine exactly how premature delivery and CVD are linked.

The March of Dimes funds research to help discover the causes of preterm labor and premature birth. In about half of cases, the cause is unknown. We hope that with our groundbreaking research, we will be able to help prevent premature birth and improve the health of mothers and babies throughout their lifetimes.

If you have questions or concerns about your future risk of CVD, speak with your health care provider.

New study offers clues as to why some women give birth prematurely

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

research_birthdefectsresearch_rdax_50Why do some women give birth early and others don’t? March of Dimes researchers are trying to find the answer to this question. A new study has revealed important clues.

The type of bacteria found in a woman’s cervix and vagina during pregnancy may either increase the risk of premature birth or protect against it.

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Maryland collected cervicovaginal (CV) bacteria from 2,000 women at three different times during their pregnancies. They then analyzed the bacteria. They found that some of the bacteria actually lowered the risk of spontaneous preterm birth. But other types of bacteria increased the chance of preterm birth significantly. The bacteria associated with spontaneous preterm birth, either providing a protective effect or increasing risk, were different between African-American and non-African-American women.

If the study is confirmed, it could mean that targeting CV bacteria may be a new therapy to prevent premature birth. Edward R.B. McCabe, MD, PhD, senior vice president and chief medical officer of the March of Dimes, stated, “From these data, we may learn how to prevent preterm birth either by eliminating the CV bacteria that are associated with an increased risk and/or by enhancing the presence of protective bacteria. This is a promising new area that should become a research priority.”

Learn more about how March of Dimes researchers are working to better understand the causes of premature birth on our website.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Weight gain during pregnancy–how much is right for you?

Monday, December 26th, 2016

Holiday weight gain can be a problem for everyone. During pregnancy, it is especially important to gain a healthy amount of weight. Gaining too much or too little weight can cause problems for your baby including premature birth.

In this video, Dr. Siobhan Dolan talks about how much weight you should gain and what to do during pregnancy to maintain a healthy weight for you and your baby. Don’t forget to talk to your provider about what is best for you. And check out our post for some healthy holiday food guidelines.

 

 

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Smoking increases the chance of premature birth

Friday, November 18th, 2016

cigarette-buttsAlthough many people know that smoking during pregnancy can cause problems, 10% of pregnant women reported smoking during the last 3 months of pregnancy. When you smoke during pregnancy, your baby is exposed to dangerous chemicals like nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar. These chemicals can lessen the amount of oxygen that your baby gets. This can slow your baby’s growth before birth and can damage your baby’s heart, lungs and brain.

If you smoke during pregnancy, you’re more likely to have:

If you smoke during pregnancy, your baby is more likely to:

Secondhand and thirdhand smoke are also bad for your baby’s health. Being around secondhand smoke during pregnancy can cause your baby to be born with low birthweight.  Babies who are around secondhand smoke are more likely than babies who aren’t to have health problems, like pneumonia, ear infections and breathing problems, such as asthma, bronchitis and lung problems. There are also at an increased risk of SIDS.

If you quit smoking during pregnancy, you and your baby immediately benefit. According to the CDC, here’s how:

  • Your baby will get more oxygen, even after just one day of not smoking.
  • There is less risk that your baby will be born too early.
  • There is a better chance that your baby will come home from the hospital with you.
  • You will be less likely to develop heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, chronic lung disease, and other smoke-related diseases.
  • You will be more likely to live to know your grandchildren.
  • You will have more energy and breathe more easily.
  • Your clothes, hair, and home will smell better.
  • Your food will taste better.
  • You will have more money that you can spend on other things.
  • You will feel good about what you have done for yourself and your baby.

So make a plan to quit today. Need help? Check out these resources:

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Join in World Prematurity Day activities tomorrow

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

Light the world purple

The world will light up purple tomorrow to bring awareness to the problem of preterm birth.

Landmarks all over the world will be ablaze in purple to honor premature babies.

Tomorrow marks the 6th annual World Prematurity Day (WPD).

One in ten babies is born too soon. Premature birth is the leading cause of death in children under the age of five worldwide. Babies born too early may have more health issues than babies born on time, and may face long term health problems that affect the brain, lungs, hearing or vision. World Prematurity Day on November 17 raises awareness of this serious health crisis.

In New York City, the Empire State Building will be bathed in purple lights. State Capitol buildings in Alabama, Pennsylvania and Tennessee will light up purple, too.Here are just a few more places where World Prematurity Day will be glowing:

  • Birmingham Zoo, AL;
  • Union Plaza Building (downtown skyline), Little Rock, AR;
  • All 5 river bridges spanning the Arkansas River;
  • Hippodrome Theater, Gainesville, FL;
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH;
  • Howard Hughes Corporation Building, Honolulu, HI;
  • Power & Light Building, Kansas City, MO;
  • Biloxi Lighthouse, MS;
  • Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA;
  • The Auxilio Mutuo Hospital, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico.

What can you do?

Share your story and video about babies born too soon here on our blog, as well as on Facebook.

Get decked out in purple tomorrow, take a photo and post it to social media with #worldprematurityday and #givethemtomorrow.

Together, we can honor the 380,000 babies born too soon each year in the U.S.

Together, we can let people know that 15 million babies are born too soon around the world every year, and that 1 million of them won’t live to their first birthday.

Together, we can change the face of premature birth and give every baby a fighting chance.

Please join us tomorrow, to raise your voice.

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Three factors you can control to help prevent premature birth

Monday, November 7th, 2016

preemie and momAlthough there are certain risk factors for premature birth that a woman is not able to change, the good news is that there are three risk factors that most women can do something about.

Researchers at the March of Dimes Ohio Collaborative Prematurity Research Center are making big strides. According to their published study, up to one-quarter of preterm births (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) might be prevented if we focused on three risk factors – birth spacing, weight before pregnancy and weight gain during pregnancy.

What did the research show?

The study looked at the records of 400,000 single births and found that more than 90% of the women had one of these three risk factors. The women in the study who had less than a year between pregnancies, were underweight before pregnancy and gained too little weight during pregnancy had the highest rates of preterm births – 25.2%, according to the researchers. The good news is that women may have more control over these risk factors than other factors, which can influence preterm births.

Birth spacing

Birth spacing is the period of time between giving birth and getting pregnant again. It’s also called pregnancy spacing or interpregnancy interval (also called IPI). Getting pregnant too soon can increase your next baby’s chances of being born prematurely, as well as being born at a low birthweight or small for gestational age (SGA). It’s best to wait at least 18 months after having a baby before getting pregnant again. If you’re older than 35 or have had a miscarriage or stillbirth, talk to your provider about how long to wait.

Weight before pregnancy

Getting to a healthy weight before pregnancy is important. Women who are overweight or underweight are more likely to have serious pregnancy complications, including giving birth prematurely. How do you know if you’re at a healthy weight? Schedule a preconception checkup with your health care provider. This is the best time to discuss your weight and make sure you’re healthy when you get pregnant.

Weight gain during pregnancy

Gaining too much or too little weight can be harmful to you and your baby. It’s important to gain the right amount of weight for your body. Your provider can help you determine how much weight you need to gain during pregnancy.

Bottom line

There is still much we do not know about the causes of premature birth. But, knowing some things that a woman can do to decrease her chance of giving birth early, is good news.

Check out the cutting edge research our Ohio Collaborative is working on.