Posts Tagged ‘prematurity’

Helping your baby thrive in the NICU

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

This video clip contains great information on nurturing your baby in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In the video, real NICU parents describe different ways to bond with your baby while in the hospital, including skin-to-skin or kangaroo care.

 

 

For more helpful information about caring for your baby in the NICU, please visit our website. Learn about resources and support that can help you and your family while your baby’s in the NICU. Also, you can go to Share Your Story, the March of Dimes online community for families to share experiences with prematurity, birth defects or loss.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Sometimes, love comes early – Pampers is offering a touch of love for those who do

Monday, November 14th, 2016

Kangaroo care Skin-to-Skin-223x300Today we welcome guest blogger Amy Tally, Senior Scientist, Pampers Hospital Diaper Development, P&G.

At Pampers, we believe every touch of love matters to the health and development of babies, especially the most vulnerable ones. That is why we’ve joined forces with the March of Dimes under the Pampers Touches of Love campaign this fall to celebrate all babies, especially those in the NICU, and those who care for them.

As part of this campaign, through World Prematurity Day on November 17, we’re asking everyone to show us all the ways that you give babies touches of love (from a hand hold or kiss on the forehead to wrapping your baby in a blanket chosen especially for her or him). For every #touchesoflove moment shared with @Pampers on Twitter & Facebook and @PampersUS on Instagram, we’ll make a $1 donation to the March of Dimes.*

One of the main reasons for our Touches of Love campaign was to underscore the importance of another major development from Pampers. We’ve worked closely with hospitals, pediatricians and nurses for 40 years, and as my colleagues and I met with hundreds of nurses over the past three years, they shared that current preemie diapers do not properly fit the smallest premature babies, and they were having to cut or fold the diaper or improvise ways to make it fit.

This is why we recently introduced our smallest diaper yet – the new Pampers Preemie Swaddlers Size P-3 diaper– because of all the challenges faced by babies who are born prematurely, a properly fitting diaper shouldn’t be one of them. Designed in partnership with NICU nurses, this diaper caters to the unique needs of babies weighing as little as one pound (500 grams) – to offer them a small touch of love. From the narrow core which offers Pampers excellent protection and allows their legs to lay comfortably and be optimally positioned, to the Absorb Away Liner™ that pulls away wetness and loose stools, a common side effect of antibiotics that premature babies are given, the new size P-3 diaper was created with the care and comfort of these tiny, premature babies at the forefront every step of the way. These size P-3 diapers are currently available in select hospitals in the United States, and will be available to hospitals across the U.S. and Canada before the end of 2016.

Being part of the development team, I can tell you that the creation of the new Pampers Preemie Swaddlers P-3 diapers was truly a labor of love. We wanted to make sure that our new diaper wrapped the tiniest babies in a gentle, loving touch because we understand that for premature babies, touch is not only a sign of love, but also a catalyst for survival and growth.

*Up to a maximum of $5,000. In addition, Pampers has made a donation of $100,000 in support of the Touches of Love campaign.

The March of Dimes does not endorse specific brands or products.

 

Recognizing families who care for preemies

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016

Preemie on oxygen_smIn addition to November being Prematurity Awareness Month, it’s National Family Caregivers Month. These two themes go together well. Caring for a premature baby can take a huge toll on parents and families. The focus is on the baby (naturally) which can be a round-the-clock roller coaster ride. But, who cares for the parents and other children?

Recently I attended a meeting for parents of special needs children. The common theme that day was coping. Parent after parent talked about the impact that one child can have on an entire family. When medical issues are present, as they are with a preemie, it is understood that everything else stops while you care for and make serious decisions related to your baby. If you have other children, they take a temporary back seat to your sick baby. Everyone pitches in to do what they must do to survive the crisis of a NICU stay.

Once the baby is home, the crisis may seem like it is over, but often it is only the start of a new journey – one with visits to more specialists than you knew existed, appointments for speech, physical,  occupational and/or respiratory therapy, a schedule of home exercises, and navigating the early intervention system. Thankfully, these interventions exist to help your baby, but it is clear that this new schedule can resemble a second full-time job.

If a parent is alone in this process (without a partner), it can be all the more daunting. Without a second set of eyes to read insurance forms, or a second set of hands to change a diaper when you are desperate for a shower, it can feel overwhelming.

What can you do?

This month is a good time to remember to reach out and ask for help. Friends often want to take a bit of the burden off of you, but simply don’t know how they can be helpful. Be specific with them. If you need grocery shopping done, send out a group text to your buddies and ask if anyone could swing by the grocery store to pick up a few items for you.

Try to set aside a couple of hours each week, on a regular basis, when you know you will have a respite. It could mean that your spouse takes care of the baby while you go take a walk or join a friend for coffee. Or, your parent or grandparent could take over for a bit so you and your spouse could watch a movie together. It doesn’t have to be a lot of time – but just knowing it is scheduled gives you something tangible to look forward to, which helps to keep you going and lift your spirits.

In other blog posts, I share ways parents can take the stress off. See this post for a list of survival tips, and this post for how to care for the brothers and sisters of your special needs child. They need special TLC!

Be sure to check out the Caregivers Action Network’s helpful tips for families as well as their useful caregiver toolkit.

If you are like me and have trouble relaxing, see “Stop. Rest. Relax…Repeat.” It may just inspire you to break the go-go-go-all-the-time pace and find ways to relax. Believe me – once you grab those precious moments to refuel, you will be glad you did. Your body and mind will thank you, and so will your family.

Do you have tips for coping? Please share.

View other posts in our Delays and Disabilities series, and send your questions to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

 

It’s Prematurity Awareness Month – Come chat with us!

Monday, October 31st, 2016

parents in the NICU

We have several Twitter chats scheduled in November, in honor of Prematurity Awareness Month.

Please join us:

Wednesday, November 2 at 1pm ET with neonatologist Dr. Suresh of Texas Children’s Hospital. Use #preemiechat

Topic:  Prematurity – causes, complications, and coping in the NICU

 

Wednesday, November 9 at 2pm ET with Mom’s Rising. Use #WellnessWed

Topic: Can your preconception health reduce your chances of giving birth early?

 

Tuesday, November 15th at 2pm ET with Genetic Alliance and Baby’s First Test. Use #preemiechat

Topic: Is prematurity caused by genetics? Can it run in families?

 

We hope to see you on Twitter!

For questions or more information about these chats, text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org

birth announcement

Infant loss affects the tiniest family members

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Loss affects entire families every day, in many different ways. In honor of Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day tomorrow, here is the heartfelt story of a family who lost their precious daughter Madeline, due to complications from prematurity.

We welcome guest blogger Heather as she shares the ripple effects of losing Maddie, as seen through the eyes of one of her children.

Maddie“Mom, we were counting our family members in school today.” The Kindergarteners have been doing a lot of exercises where they “find numbers” in the world, like counting steps, trees, etc.

“That’s fun. Do any of your classmates come from big families?”

“Yep! I didn’t know exactly how many to count. There’s four of us, but five if you count Rigby (our sweet dog). Six if Maddie hadn’t died.”

– – –

In our house, we don’t make a big deal about Madeline. We talk about her when she comes up naturally, which means sometimes we discuss her multiple times a day, and sometimes we’ll go several days without mentioning her.

I, however, say her name every day, even if it’s just to myself. I wonder what she’d be like, who her friends would be, which classroom she’d be in. I think about her without even thinking about it. Missing her has become one of my body’s automatic functions, like breathing.

Protecting myself has become automatic, too. I rarely bring her up with strangers anymore. I know many loss moms never hesitate to mention all of their children when given the chance, but I don’t. Basic questions like, “Oh, do you have other kids?” don’t hurt me the way they used to. I don’t feel like I am denying her when I don’t mention her. Instead, I am saving myself the agony of having to answer additional questions, having to relive it, having to watch a person I don’t know process this complicated answer to their simple question. I know about her, the people who love us know about her, and our future friends will one day know about her, too.

Of course, the people who surround Annabel at school every day aren’t strangers, not anymore. But this is her domain, so I follow her lead. Her drawings are of the four of us and Rigby. She said that one time she mentioned she had an older sister, but her friends were confused. I explained to her why they might be confused, and I reminded her that she only has to say what she is comfortable with – it’s okay to talk about her sister, and it’s okay not to.

“I told my teacher four or five or six, and I counted everyone for her.”

“…and what did she say?”

“She said all of my answers were right!”


Maddie’s story

After 28 weeks and 6 days of an extremely rocky gestation, Madeline Alice was born on November 11, 2007. She weighed three pounds one ounce, and was 15 3/4 inches long. Because she was over 11 weeks premature, she was rushed to a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. She spent 68 long days there until the wonderful January afternoon we brought her home.

Maddie’s prematurity left her lungs scarred, but her amazing happiness remained unscathed. She lit up the lives of everyone she met (and countless more she didn’t) with her bright eyes, infectious laugh, and gigantic grin.

On April 6th, Maddie came down with a severe respiratory infection. She left the world suddenly and unexpectedly April 7, 2009.

We miss her with every fiber of our being.

News Moms Need thanks Heather for giving us a glimpse into how deeply the effects of loss are felt, and how it affects every family member for a lifetime. You can read more about Heather and her family here.

Give them tomorrow

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

Give them tomorrowToday is an important one here at the March of Dimes.

Today we launch our new campaign, Give them tomorrow, to raise awareness and funds to fight birth defects and premature birth, the #1 killer of babies in the United States.

This campaign is different. You have the opportunity to help give a fighting chance for every baby by:

  • sending a message of hope to a family of a baby in the NICU (newborn intensive care unit), which the March of Dimes will hand-deliver.
  • sharing your baby’s first milestones at #babysfirst with our social community.
  • engaging with us on World Prematurity Day, November 17th to raise awareness and learn about the cutting edge prematurity research that saves babies’ lives.

We have set a goal to generate 380,000 actions to save babies’ lives, to symbolize the 380,000 babies born too soon each year in the U.S. That’s 1 in 10 babies born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy). This rate is higher than most other high-resource nations.

Even babies born just a few weeks too soon can face serious health challenges and are at risk for lifelong disabilities including breathing problems, vision loss, cerebral palsy, developmental delays and intellectual disabilities. The problem of prematurity involves babies being born too soon and often with birth defects and complications that affect them for life — that’s if they make it through the first critical days and weeks. There are so many challenges for these babies and their families from day one that tomorrow is a dream.

Give them tomorrow is supported by our corporate partners who are committed to saving babies’ lives. Partners in 2016 include Mud Pie, Philips Avent, Famous Footwear, ALEX AND ANI, ALDI, Bon-Ton, and Anthem Foundation.

Won’t you join us today as we make a difference in the lives of all babies?

Together we can give them tomorrow by doing something today.

 

We're in this together

 

The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. For more than 75 years, moms and babies have benefited from March of Dimes research, education, vaccines, and breakthroughs. For the latest resources and health information, visit marchofdimes.org and nacersano.org. You can also find us on Facebook or follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Preemies need vaccines, too

Wednesday, August 31st, 2016

Special thanks to the CDC for sharing this post with us in honor of National Immunization Awareness Month.

NICU babyHaving a premature baby can be stressful, and as a parent of a preemie, you may have many questions about keeping your baby healthy. One of those questions may be about whether or not you should follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) recommended immunization schedule for your baby, or if you need to adjust vaccine timing based on your baby’s early arrival.

The CDC and pediatricians agree that preterm babies, regardless of their birth weight and size, receive most vaccines according to their chronological age (the time since delivery). In fact, vaccinating as early as possible is important, because according to The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, preterm babies don’t get as many maternal antibodies through the placenta as full term babies do. This means they are more vulnerable to diseases during their first months of life. The recommended immunization schedule protects against 14 of these diseases, which can be very serious for babies.

Vaccines are safe for preemies, but like any medication, vaccines can cause side effects. The most common side effects are mild (such as redness where the shot was given) and go away within a few days. The side effects associated with vaccines are similar in preterm and full term babies.

There is one exception to following the recommended schedule — the hepatitis B vaccine, which is typically given at birth. This vaccine might not work as well in preterm babies weighing less than 70.5 ounces (2,000 grams). If a baby weighs less than 70.5 ounces and the mother is not infected with hepatitis B, the baby should receive the first hepatitis B dose one month after birth. If the mother is infected or her status is unknown, the baby should receive the vaccine at birth, but it should not be counted as part of the three-dose hepatitis B vaccine series. Then one month after birth, the baby should begin the full three-dose series.

The rotavirus vaccine may also be given differently to preterm babies. Babies usually get the first dose of the vaccine at 8 weeks, although vaccine is licensed for use as early as 6 weeks of age. CDC recommends that if a baby 6 weeks or older has been in the hospital since birth, the rotavirus vaccine should not be given until discharge.

Preemies are vulnerable to diseases and serious infections. Vaccinating according to the recommended schedule is one of the best ways to keep them healthy. For more information, talk to your child’s doctor or visit CDC’s vaccine website for parents.

Have questions? Send them to our health education specialists at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Pragmatics – helping your child learn the rules of social language

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

kids-playing-with-a-ballIf you have a child with a developmental or speech delay, you may have heard the term “pragmatics.” It refers to the use of language in a social setting – with friends, at school, and at home. Often, it is not enough that a child learns grammar and vocabulary in order to communicate. He also needs to understand how these words come together in social language.

A child struggling with pragmatics may use few words to express himself or seem disorganized in the way he speaks. He may have a hard time taking turns in conversation, or make inappropriate comments. As he gets older, he may be able to learn to read (sound out and pronounce words), but may not understand what he is reading. Usually a difficulty with pragmatics is not diagnosed until a child is at least four or five years old, and sometimes it is not identified until years later.

The following information is from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association:

Pragmatics involve three major communication skills

Using language for different purposes, such as

  • greeting (e.g., hello, goodbye)
  • informing (e.g., I’m going to get a cookie)
  • demanding (e.g., Give me a cookie)
  • promising (e.g., I’m going to get you a cookie)
  • requesting (e.g., I would like a cookie, please)

Changing language according to the needs of a listener or situation, such as

  • talking differently to a baby than to an adult
  • giving background information to an unfamiliar listener
  • speaking differently in a classroom than on a playground

Following rules for conversations and storytelling, such as

  • taking turns in conversation
  • introducing topics of conversation
  • staying on topic
  • rephrasing when misunderstood
  • how to use verbal and nonverbal signals
  • how close to stand to someone when speaking
  • how to use facial expressions and eye contact

If you are concerned about your child’s use of language, speak with his health care provider. It may be beneficial to have a specialist, such as a speech and language pathologist, test your child and provide appropriate therapy. If your child is three years old or older, he may qualify for services through your local school district. See this post to learn how to ask for a free evaluation.

To help your child use language appropriately in social settings, see the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s Pragmatic Language Tips.

To learn more about social communication disorders, see this article by Understood.

Have questions?  Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org

 

Light and sound in the NICU

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

nicu-baby2We all know that a mother’s womb is the best environment for a developing baby. But when a baby is born prematurely, this environment shifts from the quiet protected womb of mom to that of a bright and often noisy hospital setting. “Developmental care” is known as the effort to provide a preemie with an experience as similar to that of the womb as possible. This is done by making the effort to create a peaceful, stress-reduced environment. It seems to make perfect sense.

Experts agree that sounds should be kept to a minimum, as premature and sick babies are very sensitive to sound. According to the Preemies book, while in the NICU, you should:

• speak calmly in an even tone of voice
• avoid playing loud music
• close isolette cabinets and portholes gently
• avoid tapping fingers or placing bottles on an isolette
• use an isolette cover, which will help dampen noise.

However, not all experts agree on what to do regarding light. Some brain specialists offer the following suggestions:

• dim lights in the NICU
• cover your baby’s isolette with blankets to further shut out light
• use a low bedside light for when your baby needs care
• shield your baby’s eyes from direct light when you pick her up, and
• reduce noise as much as possible.

Yet, other specialists believe that the benefits of shielding your baby from light may depend on your baby’s age – the younger the baby, the more darkness he needs. And some specialists believe that light (as long as it is not glaring) may have positive developmental benefits.

To help figure out what is best for your baby, and to understand more about developmental care, talk to your baby’s neonatologist. You can also read more about it in this book Preemies: The Essential Guide for Parents of Premature Babies, 2nd Edition (2010), which provided the background for this blog post.

Questions? Send them to AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Life-long effects of preeclampsia for mom and baby

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

Pregnant couple with doctorPreeclampsia is serious; it affects 2 to 8 percent of pregnancies worldwide. And it’s the cause of 15% of premature births in the U.S.

Preeclampsia is a condition that can happen after the 20th week of pregnancy or right after you give birth. It’s when a pregnant woman has high blood pressure and signs that some of her organs, like her kidneys and liver, may not be working properly. Some of these signs include having protein in the urine, changes in vision and severe headache.

What does this mean for moms?

If a woman had preeclampsia during a pregnancy, she has 3 to 4 times the risk of high blood pressure and double the risk for heart disease and stroke later in life. She may also have an increased risk of developing diabetes. And for those women who have had preeclampsia and delivered preterm, had low-birthweight babies, or had severe preeclampsia more than once, the risk of heart disease can be higher.

These facts are scary, especially since heart disease is the leading cause of death for women. But having preeclampsia does not mean you will definitely develop heart problems, it just means that this may be a sign to pay extra attention to your health.

What about babies?

Women with preeclampsia are more likely than women who don’t have preeclampsia to have preterm labor and delivery. Even with treatment, a pregnant woman with preeclampsia may need to give birth early to avoid serious problems for her and her baby.

Premature babies and low birthweight babies may have more health problems and need to stay in the NICU longer. And some of these babies will face long-term health effects that include intellectual and developmental disabilities and other health problems.

If you had preeclampsia in the past, there are things you can do now to reduce your future risk:

  • Talk to your health care provider. She can help you monitor your health now to reduce your risk for heart disease later.
  • Get a yearly exam to check your blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, and blood sugar levels.
  • Add activity into your daily routine. No need to run laps around the track, though. Here are some tips to help you get moving, whether you are pregnant or not.
  • Stick to the good stuff. Eat from these five food groups at every meal: grains, vegetables, fruits, milk products and protein. Check out our sample menu for creative ideas.
  • Ask your provider if taking low-dose aspirin daily may be right for you.
  • If you are a smoker, quit. Try to avoid second-hand smoke as well. Tobacco can raise blood pressure and damage blood vessels.

Have questions? Text or email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.