Posts Tagged ‘prematurity awareness month’

We’re thankful for you

Friday, November 28th, 2014

ESBldg_2014newsdeskHere at News Moms Need, we’re grateful for so many things this year–especially all of you. Thanks so much to all of you who helped us make this year’s Prematurity Awareness Month such a success. Many of you shared your stories with us and others so that everyone could have a better understanding of how premature birth affects us all. We’re very grateful for your energy and support.

To all of you and your families, our thanks and best wishes. And make sure to check out our Facebook page to see images of how World Prematurity Day was celebrated around the globe.

Diabetes and premature birth: know the facts

Monday, November 10th, 2014

speak to your health care providerDid you know that having diabetes during pregnancy is a risk factor for preterm labor and premature birth? Diabetes is a serious health concern, especially when left untreated or undiagnosed. November is prematurity awareness month and we want to make sure you’re aware of the risks diabetes can have on your pregnancy.

About 9 out of 100 women in the U.S. have diabetes – a condition in which your body has too much sugar (called glucose) in the blood. You can develop diabetes at any time in your life.

Some women also develop diabetes during pregnancy, which is called gestational diabetes. Four out of every 100 pregnant women (4 percent) develop this type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after you give birth. But if you have it in one pregnancy, you’re more likely to have it in your next pregnancy. You’re also more likely to develop diabetes later in life.

Having diabetes or gestational diabetes can cause you to go into preterm labor, before 37 weeks gestation. Babies born this early can face serious health problems including long-term intellectual and developmental disabilities.

How can you find out if you have diabetes?

If you are not pregnant yet, speak with your health care provider about your concerns. He will ask you about your family health history, and evaluate your present health. He can give you a glucose tolerance test and measure your blood glucose levels to see if you have diabetes.

If you are pregnant already, you may get a glucose tolerance test at 24 to 28 weeks of pregnancy, or earlier if your provider thinks you’re likely to develop gestational diabetes. You may have heard of other pregnant women having to drink an 8oz cup of a thick syrupy drink – this is part of the glucose tolerance test, along with measuring your blood glucose levels.

Who is at risk for developing gestational diabetes?

You may be more likely than other women to develop gestational diabetes if:

• You’re 30 years old or older.
• You’re overweight or you gained a lot of weight during pregnancy.
• You have a family history of diabetes. This means that one or more of your family members has diabetes.
• You’re African-American, Native American, Asian, Hispanic or Pacific Islander. These ethnic groups are more likely to have gestational diabetes than other groups.
• You had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy.
• In your last pregnancy, you gave birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 1/2 pounds or was stillborn.

What else can you do?

It’s important for you to take care of yourself, but especially if you have diabetes or a risk factor for gestational diabetes. If you are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, talk to your health care provider about taking a glucose tolerance test. Getting diabetes under control could help prevent preterm labor and premature birth. Being active, eating healthy foods that are low in sugar and losing weight may help reduce your chances of developing diabetes later in life.

Learn more about managing pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes.  And, as always, visit your health care provider before and during pregnancy.

 

Prematurity awareness month: here’s what’s happening

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

prematurity awareness monthIt’s November, and everyone at March of Dimes is excited because it is Prematurity Awareness Month. We will be very busy getting the word out about the serious problems of preterm birth. There are ways that you can participate in helping us end prematurity.

Take a look at what we have in store:

November 17th is World Prematurity Day

Help raise awareness by wearing purple (the color of prematurity and the March of Dimes).

Twitter chats

Join in the conversation on one or all of the following chats:

November 5th – Chat on premature birth with Mom’s Rising. What is premature birth? Are you at risk? Is it ok to schedule your baby’s birth? What if you had a prior premature birth – will it happen again? What can you  do?  Ask questions and get answers on this chat at 2pm ET. Use #WellnessWed.

November 11th –  Have you or someone you know lost a baby due to prematurity or birth defects? The loss of a child is so unfair. Please join us as we share stories at 8pm ET. Use #losschat.

November 13th – Chat on Early Intervention (EI) services with the CDC, NCBDDD and CPIR. Many preemies are developmentally delayed or have disabilities. In fact, premature birth is the leading cause of lasting childhood disabilities. Early Intervention services can help your child improve. Learn how to access them and get your questions answered at 2pm ET. Use #ActEarlychat.

November 14th  – A 24 hour chat relay is happening all across the globe! The March of Dimes will be chatting about parenting in the NICU at 1pm ET. Join us at that time and tune in any other time during the day for the 24 hour chat relay. Use #worldprematurityday to watch or participate.

November 19th – Chat on Preemies with NICHD. One in 9 babies is born preterm. Learn who is at risk, what you can do to have a healthy baby, and what is being done to help end prematurity. Join us at 2pm ET and use #preemiechat.

November 20th – Chat on all things prematurity with Johnson & Johnson Global Health. Join us at 1pm ET and use #prematuritychat.

News Moms Need blog topics

We will be blogging throughout the month on topics related to prematurity including: NEC, diabetes, new research, “who’s who” in the NICU, and other important topics.

Facebook

“Like” and follow us on Facebook on the World Prematurity Day page and on the March of Dimes page.

These are just a few of the events we have on our calendar. Check back throughout the month for the most up-to-date prematurity news and information. We hope you join us and tell all your friends! With your help, we will get closer to achieving our mission of ending prematurity.

 

Holywood stars turn out to fight for preemies

Monday, November 9th, 2009

halle-berry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was this weekend’s hot ticket event and what the internet has been buzzing about.  Hollywood stars turned the red carpet to March of Dimes purple.

Moms, Halle Berry, Nicole Richie, Julie Bowen and other celebrities showed up in LA at the March of Dimes Celebration of Babies, November 7, at the Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills.

Show your support and join the fight for preemies. Create a virtual purple wristband for a baby you love and help give other babies a fighting chance.

Photos by Alex J. Berliner©Berliner Studio/BEImages

Fight for Preemies

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

It’s Prematurity Awareness Month, when everyone’s focused on premature birth and the families touched by it.

 

In our country alone, more than half a million babies are born too soon each year, some very sick. Maybe you had a premature baby yourself. Or you may know someone who did.

 

This November, do something special for a baby you love. Click over to marchofdimes.org/prematurity and create a virtual band in honor or memory of a baby in your life. Your gift funds research and programs that give premature babies a fighting chance.

 

If you have a blog, help us spread the word. Unite with thousands of bloggers around the world and post about premature birth  on November 17.

And if you are Twitter, use #fight4preemies.  Let’s try to get a trending topic going on November 17th.

Born Too Soon

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

One in eight babies is born too soon in America. But what about the rest of the world? The March of Dimes just published the results of the first-ever study into the global problem of premature birth. I’m sorry to tell you, the news is disturbing:

• Every year, 13 million babies worldwide are born prematurely, and more than one million die because they are born too soon.

• Rates of premature birth are increasing everywhere ― in our country alone, the rate has gone up by 36 percent in the last 25 years.

There are more shocking stats, you can read them here . But there’s also good news to come out of this. We’re meeting with world health leaders to create a plan for global action that will reduce the prematurity rate and give all babies a fighting chance.

Next month is Prematurity Awareness Month. Check back to find out what we’re doing. If you have a blog, unite with thousands of bloggers around the world and post about premature birth.

And visit our new site, marchofdimes.org/prematurity for more ways to get involved!