Posts Tagged ‘problem’

FDA concerned about BPA, chemical used in plastics

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

plastic-baby-bottleThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expressed concerns about BPA, a chemical used in plastics. BPA is used to make plastics clear, strong and hard to break. Some baby bottles, dishes and toys contain this chemical. BPA stands for bisphenol A.

Some studies have linked BPA to developmental problems in the brain, behavior and prostate gland in fetuses, infants and young children.

The FDA and other organizations are conducting in-depth studies about BPA. Until we have more answers, the FDA has several recommendations for parents, including:

* If plastic baby bottles and infant cups contain BPA, discard them if they have scratches.

* Do not put boiling or very hot liquids, such as formula, into plastic bottles or containers that contain BPA.

* Read the label to see if a plastic container is dishwasher safe. Don’t put it in the dishwasher unless it is.

Plastic products for babies are now available that do not contain BPA.

Prematurity Awareness Day and MomsLikeMe.com

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009

preemie1Prematurity Awareness Day was a big success! On Facebook, Twitter and all over the blogosphere, people were talking about premature birth to help raise awareness of this serious and common problem.

The March of Dimes worked with MomsLikeMe.com, a Web site created for moms by moms, to ask their users if they considered premature birth a serious issue in the United States. At 54 percent, just over half of those polled thought the issue was “extremely serious,” and 46 percent felt it was only “somewhat serious” or “not serious at all.”

As Prematurity Awareness Month draws to a close, our work to raise awareness of premature birth as an extremely serious condition is not over. And we need to continue the fight for the half a million babies born too soon each year. You can join in the conversation and share your experices with other moms at MomsLikeMe.com.

Recall: Face paints from Oriental Trading

Tuesday, May 12th, 2009

face-paintingFun Express, a subsidiary of Oriental Trading Company of Omaha, Nebraska, has voluntarily recalled some water-based face paints, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Some children have had skin reactions where the paint was applied. Examples: swelling, itching, rashes, burning.

The FDA has found microorganisms in paint samples that were tested.

For a list of the recalled products, go to the FDA news release.

Photo credit: Princess Shari, Flickr

The risks of teen pregnancy

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009

teenage-girl-2For so many women, pregnancy is a wonderful time: full of hope and excitement about a new baby. But for teens, pregnancy brings some  challenges.

Teen mothers and their babies face special health risks. Compared to other pregnant women, the teen mom is more likely to face complications. Examples:  premature labor, anemia and high blood pressure.

Babies born to teen moms are at increased risk of premature birth, low weight at birth, breathing problems, bleeding in the brain,  and vision problems.

Teen pregnancy also affects a young woman’s educational and job opportunities. Teen moms are less likely to graduate from high school than other teenagers. They are also more likely to live in poverty than women who wait to have a baby.

Today is the National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Teen birth rates in the United States are on the rise again after a steady decline between 1991 and 2005.

If you are a teen, please think carefully about getting pregnant. If you know a teen, help her understand why it’s usually best to delay pregnancy.

For more information, read the March of Dimes fact sheet.

A promising treatment for peanut allergy? Maybe

Monday, March 16th, 2009

peanuts-sm1The media has been buzzing about a possible new treatment for peanut allergy. Here’s what we know.

Scientists from Duke University presented new research at a national medical meeting on Sunday. This sparked headlines and conversation.

One pilot study involved 33 children who were severely allergic to peanuts. Symptoms of this allergy include stomach upset, skin reactions and, in the most serious cases, breathing problems that can be deadly.

Researchers gave each child a dose of peanuts every day using a powder sprinkled on food. At the beginning, the dose was very small. Over time, it increased, amounting to 15 peanuts per day. 

Most children in the study did not have allergic reactions. But four dropped out of the research because they did. After 2 1/2 years, five children in the study stopped the treatment. They can now eat peanuts just like their friends who aren’t allergic.  

Are these five children “cured” of peanut allergy? It’s too early to say. Doctors will watch them carefully for several years to know for sure.

So what does this mean for people who have peanut allergies? Too early to say. More research is needed to confirm the pilot study.

Most important: Don’t try this on yourself or on your children. All the children in the study received their doses under the supervision of medical professionals. They were watched closely for allergic reactions.

To learn more about food allergies, read the March of Dimes article on our Web site.