Posts Tagged ‘snow’

Snowy days and pregnancy – what you need to know

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

shovel in snow If you’re pregnant, you need to be extra careful about walking on the snow and ice. Here’s why:

During pregnancy, your ligaments become looser to allow your body to accommodate your growing baby. The hormone relaxin helps to prepare your body for labor and delivery, but it can also affect your joints making you feel unsteady. This change can put you at risk for injury, especially on slippery pavements.

If you are in your third trimester of pregnancy, your center of gravity may be off balance, which could make you prone to slips and falls. Your center of gravity refers to the place in your body that helps anchor you to the earth, so that you don’t tip over. A natural point of balance is below the navel and halfway between the abdomen and lower back. Having a strong center of gravity helps you have good balance.

During pregnancy, as your baby grows, your center of gravity moves forward and upward. Therefore, feeling off-balance is likely to worsen later on in your pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. Slipping and falling is much easier when your center of gravity has shifted.

Be prepared

Try to get help from family or friends with shoveling snow. Keep a bag of calcium chloride handy and sprinkle it on slippery walks to melt the snow and ice.

With a little thought and planning, you can remain safe during the cold, winter months. Then, when your baby is born, your center of gravity and ligaments will slowly return to normal again, and you can resume your usual activities.

Have questions? Text or email AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

 

Keeping you and your baby warm in winter

Monday, December 1st, 2014

Staying warmDecember is here and the temperatures in many parts of the country have turned from cold to freezing. Sipping hot chocolate under a blanket and ice skating at the local rink are some of my favorite activities during this month. But, staying warm and healthy this season is my top priority. Here are some tips to help keep you and your little one safe and warm.

Brrrrrrrr, it’s cold outside! Dress for the weather.

Listen to weather forecasts –

Before you or your child gets dressed to go outside, especially for outdoor activities, it is important to know the weather conditions. Dressing for 20 degree weather is different than dressing for 40 degree weather.

Layer it on –

Dress your little one in several thin layers, such as a T-shirt, long sleeved shirt, sweater or sweatshirt and a winter jacket, preferably waterproof and wind resistant. Your child should also have warm socks and waterproof boots, gloves or mittens and a hat. For older babies and young children, dress them in one more layer of clothing than you would wear in the same conditions.

Limit time outside-

Snow is fun and great to play in, but your little one should come inside frequently to warm up and change out of wet clothes, if needed. Wet clothing chills a body rapidly. If your child starts sweating while playing outside, remove an extra layer of clothing. Excess perspiration can increase your child’s heat loss. And remember, if you see your child shivering, that is a sure sign to go indoors and warm up.

Stay healthy through the cold weather-

The low temperatures outside can cause your home to become colder and dryer. You may find your skin feels much more dry than usual. Many pediatricians feel that bathing an infant 2 or 3 times a week is enough for the first year. Bathing more frequently may dry out your baby’s skin, especially during this cold season.

As the temperatures drop at night, you may be tempted to put a warm blanket over your infant, but keep all blankets, bumpers, sheepskins and other loose bedding out of your infant’s crib. Instead dress your baby in a warm onesie sleeper.

Keeping hands clean is also important to avoid getting sick and spreading germs. Make sure your family frequently washes their hands to keep viruses like colds and flu from spreading.

December is a great time to take your children out for fun winter activities, but make sure they are dressed appropriately and take precautions to keep your whole family healthy this winter. With a few extra steps, everyone in your family will be warm and healthy despite frigid temperatures.

These and other tips may be found on the CDC website.